Volume 44, Number 1& 2 (July & September 2012)

By | July 14, 2014

1. Md. Latheef Pasha, D. Bhadru, L. Krishna And R. B. M. Naik [Comparative performance of different rice planting methods under Nagarjuna Sagar Project Left Canal Command Area (Sri Lal Bahadur Shastri Canal) of Nalgonda district]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 1-4 (2012). Agricultural Research Station, Kampasagar, Nalgonda-508 207 (Andhra Pradesh), India

ABSTRACT

A field study was conducted at Agricultural Research Station, Kampasagar, Nalgonda district of Andhra Pradesh during the kharif season of 2008-09 to evaluate the different planting methods of rice under Nagarjuna Sagar Project Left Canal Command Area (Sri Lal Bahadur Shastri Canal) of Nalgonda district. The experiment was laid out in large plots with seven methods of establishment (Yangi eight row transplanter, semi-dry rice cultivation (sowing of dry seed behind small plough, sowing of dry seed with gorru and sowing of dry seed with national seed drill), system of rice intensification, puddled direct seeded rice and random transplanting (farmer practice). Out of which, sowing of dry seed behind the small plough recorded highest grain yield (6475 kg/ha) than other methods. Sowing of dry seed with national seed drill produced almost equal grain yield to that of  sowing of dry seed behind small plough (6416 kg/ha). Transplanting with Yangi eight row transplanter recorded grain yield of 5600 kg/ha when compared to random transplanting (5250 kg/ha). The water productivity was higher in semi-dry rice sown behind small plough (5.39 kg/ha-mm) followed by semi-dry rice sown with national seed drill (5.03 kg/ha-mm). Highest gross and net returns were obtained in semi-dry rice sown behind small plough (Rs. 84175 and 62900) followed by semi-dry rice sowing with national seed drill (Rs. 83408 and 62058). Though higher investment for cultivation in Yangi eight row transplanter (Rs. 36950), higher gross returns were obtained (Rs. 72800) as compared to random transplanting (Rs. 68250).

2. MD. MOKIDUL ISLAM AND D. C. KALITA [Agro-input management for economic performance of wetland rice cultivation]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 5-10 (2012). Krishi Vigyan Kendra ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Tura Sangsanggre, Dobasipara, West Garo Hills, Meghalaya-794 005, India

ABSTRACT

A study was undertaken during the cropping season of 2010-11 in West Garo Hills district of Meghalaya to evaluate the agro-input management for economic performance of wetland rice cultivation. Data for the study were collected from 120 wetland rice farmers through simple random sampling procedure from six different Community Development Blocks. The study revealed that the agriculture particularly wetland rice cultivation was considered as the primary and secondary occupation of the sample population in the study area. Cultivation of wetland rice was relatively more important for lower size groups of farmers, while plantation and fishery was relatively more important in higher size groups of farmers, in the sample population in the study area. The results showed that the highest overall share of utilization of agro-inputs was accounted for by human labour (40.61%) followed by tractor/power tiller (24.29%). Other agro-inputs like seeds, FYM/vermicompost, fertilizers and bullock labour accounted for 6.12, 4.12, 4.29 and 2.11% of total expenditure, respectively. The total variable cost in cultivation of wetland rice accounted for Rs. 13,793.57, 19, 882.16, 17, 545.17 and Rs. 17,073.63/ha resulting in a total per hectare return of Rs. 24,289.13, Rs. 24, 497.27, Rs. 33,366.67 and Rs. 29,051.02 with benefit : cost ratio of 1.76, 1.48, 1.90 and 1.70 in various size groups of I, II, III and overall, respectively. Hence, the proper management of agro-inputs like seeds, fertilizers, irrigation and marketing might lead to economic viability of wetland rice cultivation.

3. B. S. SOWMYALATHA, C. RAMACHANDRA, N. SHIVAKUMAR, M. N. THIMMEGOWDA AND K. P. SURESH NAIK [Influence of methods of cultivation and fertility levels on productivity and profitability of rice hybrids]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 11-13 (2012). Zonal Agricultural Research Station V. C. Farm, Mandya (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rainy season of 2010 at ZARS, V. C. Farm, Mandya, coming under the jurisdiction of University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka to study the economic analysis of rice hybrids grown under different methods of cultivation and fertility levels in Cauvery command area. The experimental soil was red sandy loam in texture, having soil pH of 6.05 and low in organic carbon content (0.42%). The experiment consisted of 18 treatment combinations of two methods of cultivation, three rice hybrids and three fertility levels were laid out in split-split plot design with three replications. The study of the investigation revealed that significantly higher grain yield was obtained under SRI method of planting (7669 kg/ha) with rice hybrid Arize (7778 kg/ha) at 150% RDF (7793 kg/ha) than conventional method of cultivation. The SRI method of planting with rice hybrid Arize (6444) at 150% RDF recorded significantly higher net income and B : C ratio (Rs. 50,886/ha and 1.62, respectively) compared to conventional method of cultivation.

4. S. S. DHAYAL, D. L. BAGDI, B. L. KAKRALYA, Y. S. SAHARAWAT AND M. L. JAT [Brassinolide induced modulation of physiology, growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under water stress condition]. Crop Res.44(1&2): 14-19 (2012). Department of Plant Physiology S. K. N. College of Agriculture, Jobner-303 329 (Rajasthan), India

ABSTRACT

A pot experiment was conducted to study the modulation effect of brassinolide under water stress and non-water stress condition on physiology, growth and yield of wheat cultivars, namely, Raj-3777 (water stress tolerant) and HD-2329 (water stress sensitive), grown in ceramic pots under normal condition till anthesis stage, then plants were sprayed with brassinolide (0.0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 ppm) concentration. The half of the plants were subjected to water stress by withholding irrigation for a period of 10 days. The non-stress plants were irrigated as frequently as needed and observations were recorded at 10 and 20 days after anthesis. Water stress was found to decrease significantly in the data of photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, relative water content, chlorophyll stability index, leaf area, leaf dry weight, plant height, number of spikes per plant, number of grains per ear, test weight and grain yield along with a significant difference between them. The effect of Brassinolide was found to increase in the value of these parameters significantly at all the stages in both the cultivars of wheat up to 1.5 ppm concentration of it. These variables are positively correlated with grain yield.

5. B. K. Medhi, D. S. Ruhal, C. P. Singh, D. K. Grover and A. Sarma [Effect of levels of phosphate and organic manures on phosphate supplying capacity and P-kinetics in wheat grown in a Typic Haplustept soil]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 20-25 (2012). Department of Soil Science CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India

ABSTRACT

A pot experiment with wheat (WH 542) as test crop was conducted in screen house on a Typic Haplustept surface (0-15 cm) soil of Haryana Agricultural University Farm, Hisar. Initial laboratory studies showed that around 30.4 to 63.2% of added P was found to retain by the soil and phosphate sorption (x/m) increased progressively with increase in solution P concentrations. Phosphate supplying capacity (PSC) based on quantity-intensity relationship over the days of wheat growth was found to increase significantly with increase in levels of added P. The decrease of PSC upto 30 days and variations thereafter, towards higher values upto 90 days at P50 and P100 levels of P application all throughout the growing periods of wheat growth was observed. FYM always showed significantly highest PSC over that of green manuring treatment. First order kinetic equations showed higher values of P content at 0 day (intercept) of crop growth and found to increase progressively with increasing levels of P along with organic manures. However, reverse trend was observed in second order kinetic constants. Strong and significant positive correlation between cumulative P desorbed and t1/2 reflected that rate of release of P was synchronizing with time or rather a good state of equilibrium was achieved in relation to crop condition. Significantly highest dry matter yield and P uptake in the treatment receiving P @ 100 mg/kg soil was observed and indicated that phosphate utilization by the crop was solely governed by the process of diffusion. FYM towards dry matter yield and P uptake was significantly higher over that of green manures suggested that green manures could not be an alternate source of FYM towards better P uptake and dry matter yield in wheat crop.

6. Gajendra Singh, G. L. Sharma, Shankar Lal Golada and Ramniwas Choudhary [Effect of integrated nutrient management on quality protein maize (Zea mays L.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 26-29 (2012). Department of Agronomy, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture & Technology, Udaipur-313 001 (Rajasthan), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2010 at Instructional Farm of Agronomy, Rajasthan College of Agriculture, Udaipur to study the integrated nutrient management on quality protein maize (Zea mays L.) cv. HQPM-1. Sixteen treatment combinations comprising four levels of enriched FYM with fertilizers viz., conventional (FYM @ 10 t/ha+100% RDF), enriched FYM+50% RDF, enriched FYM+100% RDF and enriched FYM+150% RDF and four biofertilizer levels viz., control, Azotobacter, PSB and Azotobacter+PSB were laid out factorial concept in  randomized block design with three replications. The application of FYM @ 10 t/ha enriched with 150% RDF recorded significantly increased grain yield (4449.52 kg/ha), stover yield (8026.52 kg/ha), Sharvest index (35.64% ) and protein content in grain (11.84%) over rest of the treatments. Similar trend was also observed in N and P content and uptake in grain and stover and available N and P in soil. Seed inoculation with Azotobacter+PSB culture maximized grain yield (4368.35 kg/ha), stover yield (873.6 kg/ha), harvest index (35.26%) and protein content in grain (12.16%) over another treatment. Similar trend was also observed in N and P content and uptake in grain and stover and available N and P in soil.

7. MD. LATHEEF PASHA, L. KRISHNA, D. BHADRU AND R. B. M. NAIK [Response of zero tillage maize after kharif rice under different methods of establishment and N levels in Nagarjuna Sagar Project Left Canal Command Area (Sri Lal Bahadur Shastri Canal) of Nalgonda district]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 30-32 (2012). Agricultural Research Station, Kampasagar, Nalgonda-508 207 (Andhra Pradesh), India

ABSTRACT

A field study was conducted at Agricultural Research Station, Kampasagar, Nalgonda district of Andhra Pradesh during the rabi season of 2008-09 to evaluate the performance of zero tillage maize under different methods of establishment and N levels after kharif rice. The experiment was laid out in split plot design with five methods of establishment (Zero till drill sowing, hand dibbling, farmers’ practice, sowing behind the small plough and sowing with dibbling machine) as main plots and five nitrogen levels (0, 60, 120, 180 and 240 kg N/ha) as sub-plots. The grain yield was significantly higher with hand dibbling (6244 kg/ha) than sowing with zero till drill machine (5166 kg/ha), behind the small plough (4472 kg/ha) and sowing with dibbling machine (4472 kg/ha). Cob length, diameter and 100-grain weight were significantly higher with hand dibbling.  Increase in N level from 0 to 240 kg N/ha significantly increased the grain yield (7130 kg/ha). Grain number per cob was significantly higher at 240 kg N/ha than 0 and 60 kg N/ha. Cob length and diameter were increased significantly with increase in N level from 0 to 240 kg N/ha. The cob length observed at 180 and 240 kg N/ha and cob diameter at 60 and 120 kg N/ha were on par.

8. SUSHIL KUMAR*, M. YAKADRI AND S. S. RAO [Effect of nitrogen levels and planting geometry on sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) growth, stalk and grain yields1]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 33-36 (2012). Department of Agronomy Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India *(e-mail : sushilangrau@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rabi 2008-09 season at Hyderabad to investigate the effect of nitrogen levels and planting geometry on sweet sorghum growth, stalk and grain yields. Application of nitrogen @ 90 kg/ha gave 49 and 13% higher biomass, respectively, over 30 and 60 kg N levels. Stalk yield increased by 13.4 % at 90 kg N/ha (25.9 t/ha) over 30 kg (22.88 t/ha), but it was on par with 60 kg N (24.83 t/ha). Planting geometry of 30 x 15 cm (high plant density) recorded 106% more grain yield (3600 kg/ha) than 60 x 15 cm (1750 kg/ha), but it was on par with 45 x 15 cm. Application of 90 kg N produced 17.0% more grain yield than 30 kg N, but it was on par with 60 kg N. Inter-row spacing of 30 x 15 cm along with 90 kg N/ha produced 31.0% higher grain yield than at 30 x 15 cm with 60 kg N. Higher net returns (Rs. 34,068/ha) and B : C ratio (3.38) were recorded with 30 x 15 cm spacing and 90 kg N/ha.

9. S. GANGWAR* AND M. DUBEY** [Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) root nodulation and yield as affected by micronutrients application and Rhizobium inoculation]. Crop Res. 44 (1&2) : 37-41 (2012). Department of Agronomy Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Jabalpur-482 004 (M. P.), India *(e-mail : singh.suchi40@gmail.com; **meghadubey33@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

Chickpea is the seed of the annual plant (Cicer arietinum L.). It belongs to the Leguminosae family widely grown for its nutritious seeds. Chickpea is a deep rooted, self-pollinated, annual legume crop. Chickpea is used for diabetes and high cholesterol. In the present text, the study on effect of application of micronutrients and inoculation of Rhizobium on root nodulation in chickpea was studied. The increase in the number of branches, number of nodules, dry weight of nodules per plant, pods per plant, seed yield, straw yield, net monetary return and B : C ratio was studied and its comparative increase on the economics was calculated. Ultimately the result was that the application of recommended dose of fertilizer in chickpea along with Rhizobium inoculation and application of PSB as well as seed treatment with ammonium molybdate 2 g/kg could be used and it was found to be the best treatment among all the other treatments. Hence, this was the ultimate result of the experiment.

10. A. K. PAL AND B. KEORAH [Pre-sowing seed treatment and foliar spray of nitrate salts on yield of summer greengram [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] in alluvial soil of West Bengal]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 42-44 (2012). Department of Agronomy Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur-741 235 (W. B.), India

ABSTRACT

Field experiment conducted at BCKV Farm, West Bengal with greengram during pre-kharif (February to May) in split plot design with four levels of pre-sowing seed treatment (no treatment, with 1% concentration of potassium chloride, with 0.1% concentration of ammonium molybdate and with Rhizobium inoculation) allotted on the main plots and three levels of foliar spray of nitrate salts (no spray, spray with 0.5% concentration of potassium nitrate salt and with 0.4% concentration of calcium nitrate salt) allotted on the sub-plots under each main plot revealed that application of pre-sowing seed treatments and spraying of nitrate salts significantly influenced the number of pods/plant, length of pod, number of seeds/pod, test weight and ultimately seed yield, stalk yield and harvest index of greengram. The seed yield for inoculation was 8.21 q/ha, being significantly better than other seed treatments, with an increase by 22.90% over untreated control. Maximum seed yield (8.11 q/ha) was obtained for the spray with 0.4% concentration calcium nitrate salt being significantly better over the spray with 0.5% concentration potassium nitrate salt. The increase in seed yield for the sprays of potassium nitrate and calcium nitrate salts over no spray was 15.99 and 25.93%, respectively. For maximum seed yield of 9.35 q/ha, the best combination was for the foliar spray of 0.4% concentration calcium nitrate salt with seed inoculation.

11. GOGRAJ JAT, D. L. BAGDI, B. L. KAKRALYA, M. L. JAT AND P. S. SHEKHAWAT [Mitigation of salinity induced effects using brassinolide in clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.)]. Crop Res.44(1&2): 45-50 (2012). Department of Plant Physiology S. K. N. College of Agriculture, Jobner-303 329 (Rajasthan), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted to study the harmful effect of salinity and their amelioration by the application of brassinolide on physiological, biochemical traits, growth and yield of clusterbean cultivars, namely, RGC-1038 (salinity tolerant) and RGC-936 (salinity susceptible), grown in cemented pots under different levels of salinity (0, 8 and 12 dS/m) at vegetative and flowering stages. Plants were sprayed with brassinolide (0, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 ppm). Control plants were provided normal water. Salinity was found to decrease significantly the photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate (at flowering stage), stomatal conductance, relative water content, chlorophyll stability index, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod, plant height, pod length, leaf area index, test weight, grain yield, biological yield, harvest index and K+ and Na+ content in grain. The use of brassinolide up to 1.0 ppm was observed to increase significantly in above mentioned variables. Genotype RGC-1018 recorded the higher values of these parameters than RGC-936.

12. M. S. Puneeth Raj*, P. J. Devaraju, K. R. Rame Gowda, H. S. Sreeramulu, Yogeesha and B. V. Pavitra [Effect of seed size and threshing methods on seed quality parameters of French bean [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) cv. Arka suvidha]]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 51-54 (2012). Department of Seed Science & Technology University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India *(e-mail : rajpuneeth@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The field experiment was carried out at UAS, GKVK, Bangalore to study the effect of seed size and threshing methods on seed quality parameters of French bean [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) cv. Arka suvidha]. The experiment consisted treatment combinations of seed size and threshing methods and its interaction effects. The results revealed that the bold seeds recorded increased seed quality parameters. The size group of S2 (5.00 mm) and S3 (4.75 mm) recorded increased seed quality parameters. Whereas 5.00 mm showed significantly increased seed quality parameters as compared to that of bulk seeds.

13. D. C. HANUMANTHAPPA, MUDALAGIRIYAPPA, RUDRASWAMY, G. N. VEERA KUMAR AND K. PADMANABHA [Effect of weed management practices on growth and yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) under rainfed conditions]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 55-58 (2012). Zonal Agricultural Research Station, G. K. V. K., Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out during kharif 2010 at Zonal Agricultural Research Station, G. K. V. K., Bangalore to know the effect of weed management practices on growth and yield of the cowpea. In this study, different weed control methods (chemical, mechanical and hand weeding) were compared for their efficiency to control various weed species under rainfed conditions. Among different weed control methods, application of pendimethalin @ 0.75 kg a. i./ha as pre-emergence spray or use of pendimethalin @ 0.75 kg a. i./ha as pre-emergence+one hoeing at 20-25 DAS gave broad spectrum of weed control and resulted in higher cowpea seed yield and B : C ratio similar to weed free up to 40 DAS  and two hoeings @ 20-25 and 30-40 DAS. Similarly, the above treatments outyielded other treatments in terms of number of branches per plant, number of pods per pod and grain yield. Lowest cowpea seed yield and B : C ratio were recorded in weedy check. Maximum reduction in biomass of the weeds was observed by application of pendimethalin @ 0.75 kg a. i./ha as pre-emergence spray or use of pendimethalin @ 0.75 kg a. i./ha as pre-emergence+one hoeing at 20-25 DAS.

14. Mahaveer Prasad*, Joy Dawson and R. S. Yadav [Effect of different nitrogen sources and phosphate solubilizing bacteria on growth and yield of grain cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.]]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 59-62 (2012). Department of Agronomy Allahabad Agricultural Institute-Deemed University, Allahabad-211 007 (U. P.), India *(e-mail : balodamp.agro@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field  experiment was conducted at the Crop Research Farm, Department of Agronomy, Allahabad Agricultural Institute, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh during rainy (kharif) season of 2008 to study the effect of different nitrogen sources and PSB on growth and yield of grain cowpea [Vigna ungiculata (L.) Walp.] Inoculation of Rhizobium+PSB along with 20 kg N/ha through vermicompost significantly increased the growth i. e. plant height, number of root nodules/plant, plant dry weight, crop growth rate and yield attributing characters i. e. pods/plant, grains/pod, seed index and consequently grain and haulm yield. Dual inoculation of Rhizobium+PSB along with 20 kg N/ha through vermicompost significantly increased the harvest index, net returns and had higher B : C ratio also.

15. ANJUM AHMAD, NIDHI VERMA AND G. S. TOMAR [Effect of different doses of phosphorus on quality of fodder cowpea [Vigna unguiculata  (L.) Walp.]]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 63-67 (2012). Department of Agronomy College of Agricultue, Raipur-492 006 (C. G.), India

ABSTRACT

A field study was conducted at the Instructional Farm of I. G. K. V., Raipur during kharif season of 2008 to assess the quality of different varieties of cowpea {Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] under varying levels of phosphorus. Treatments consisted of six varieties viz., UPC-9202, UPC-4200, UPC-626, UPC-628, UPC-629 and Bundel lobia-1 and three levels of phosphorus viz. 40, 60 and 80 kg P2O5/ha. Variety UPC-626 produced significantly wider leaf : stem ratio compared with all other varieties. On the other hand, Bundel lobia-1 resulted in narrower L : S ratio among different varieties. Phosphorus at 80 kg P2O5/ha gave wider L : S ratio (0.78) being significantly higher than the lower dose of phosphorus application. Variety UPC-626 was found to contain maximum nitrogen (2.28%) and drew maximum amount of nitrogen (98.02 kg/ha) being significantly higher than those found in other varieties. Highest protein content of 14.25% and protein yield of 612.64 kg/ha were recorded with UPC-626. Bundel lobia-1 was found to be inferior in protein content and its yield. Maximum protein content of 13.07% and protein yield of 504.91 kg/ha were obtained when crop received highest dose of phosphorus.

16. MANGLESHWAR PRASAD PATEL, G. P. RICHHARIYA, R. D. SHARMA AND K. N. NAMDEO [Effect of fertility levels on growth, yield and quality of soybean  (Glycine max) genotypes]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 68-70 (2012). Department of Botany Government P. G. College, Satna-485 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rainy seasons of 2009 and 2010 to study the effect of fertility levels  on growth, yield and quality of soybean genotypes. Among the early genotypes of soybean, JS 81-1504  proved the most suitable which yielded 11.75 q/ha with net income upto Rs.14291/ha having 40.71%  protein and 20.71% oil in grain. The most balanced and economical fertility level for the early soybean genotypes was N30P60S40Zn10 which gave the highest grain yield (12.86 q/ha) and net return (Rs. 15572/ha), grain protein (42.32%) and grain oil (22.08%). The genotype JS 81-1504 grown with the highest fertility level (N30P60S40Zn10) further augmented these parameters.

17. MANGLESHWAR PRASAD PATEL, G. P. RICHHARIYA, R. D. SHARMA AND K. N. NAMDEO [Effect of fertility levels on nutrient contents and uptake of  soybean (Glycine max) genotypes]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 71-74 (2012). Department of Botany Government P. G. College, Satna-485 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rainy seasons of 2009 and 2010 to study the effect of fertility levels on nutrient contents and uptake of soybean genotypes. The nutrient contents in grain and straw viz., N, P, K, S and Zn did not deviate significantly due to different genotypes and fertility levels as well as their interactions. Amongst the genotypes, nutrients uptake of N, P, K, S, Zn was non-significantly higher in grain and straw of JS 81-1504 except P uptake. The nutrients uptake in grain and straw was significatly higher due to applied fertility levels over control. The highest nutrients uptake by soybean producing a total biomass upto 27.50 q/ha with  highest fertility level (N30P60S40Zn10) was 106.15 kg N, 14.84 kg P, 47.50 kg K, 7.11 kg S and 2.97 kg Zn/ha.   The findings suggest that due to heavy withdrawal of nutrients by soybean genotypes, the succeeding crop must be nourished properly based on soil test values.

18. Chandra Kumar Verma, Kedar Prasad and D. D. Yadav [Studies on response of sulphur, zinc and boron levels on yield, economics and nutrients uptake of mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss.]]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 75-78 (2012). Department of Agronomy Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rabi season of 2008-09 and 2009-10 at the Students’ Instructional Farm, Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur to evaluate the effect of sulphur (0, 20, 40 and 60 kg S/ha), zinc (0, 5 and 10 kg Zn/ha) and boron (0, 0.5 and 1.0 kg B/ha) levels on quality, economics and uptake of nutrients in mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss]. Results revealed that application of 60 kg S/ha gave significantly higher seed yield, economics, oil yield, protein yield and nutrients uptake (kg/ha) than control, 20 and 40 kg S/ha during experimental years. The application of 10 kg Zn/ha produced maximum seed yield, net return, B : C ratio, oil yield, protein yield and nutrients uptake of mustard. The application of 1.0 kg B/ha significantly increased seed yield, economics, oil yield, protein yield and nutrients uptake (kg/ha) of mustard over control and 0.5 kg B/ha. On economic basis, the highest profit was recorded with carbined use of 60 kg S/ha+5 kg Zn/ha and 1.0 kg B/ha.

19. Y. S. PARAMESWARI*, A. SRINIVAS and MADHU MOGULOJU [Effect of nitrogen and boron on growth and yield attributes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 79-81 (2012). Department of Agronomy Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India *(e-mail : samata.param@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted on response of summer sunflower to nitrogen and foliar application of boron at Students’ Farm, College of Agriculture, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad during summer season of 2009 with an objective to work out the optimum and economic level of nitrogen in relation to boron nutrition to summer sunflower. The treatments consisted of three levels of nitrogen (60, 90 and 120 kg/ha) and each level with the combination of boron spraying at 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% along with one additional treatment i. e. 90 kg N+hand pollination. In total, there were 10 treatments laid out in randomized block design replicated thrice. The results of the experiment indicated significant influence of treatments on plant growth, yield attributes and seed yield. Maximum growth was manifested at 120 kg N/ha+0.2% boron spray. Similarly, the yield attributes and seed yield of sunflower were also significantly improved due to application of nitrogen at higher levels in combination of boron spray indicating maximum values of yield attributes and the highest seed yield with 120 kg N/ha+0.2% boron spray. The highest yield of 1534.6 kg/ha was realized with 120 kg N/ha+0.2% boron spray which was more by 318.3 kg/ha over the lowest level of nitrogen i. e. 60 kg N/ha+0.1% boron spray. There was marginal increase in the yield attributes and yield due to increase in level of boron spray from 0.1 to 0.2% when compared at a given level of nitrogen. The advantage of hand pollination was not seen over boron spray treatment.

20. S. S. Mahal, J. S. Brar, A. S. Brar and K. K. Vashist [Water productivity of spring sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) under varying planting methods and irrigation schedules]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 82-84 (2012). Department of Agronomy Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141 004 (Punjab), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Research Farm, Department of Agronomy, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana to work out the water productivity of spring sunflower under varying planting methods and irrigation schedules during 2010. The experiment was laid out in split plot design keeping five methods of planting [Flat sowing (Flat), sowing at the top of ridge laid down in east-west direction (TR), sowing on the southern slope of ridge laid down in east-west direction (SR), sowing at the centre of raised bed laid down in east-west direction (CB) and sowing on the southern slope of raised bed laid down in east-west direction (SB)] in main plots and three irrigation schedules ( IW/CPE  0.8, 1.0 and 1.2) in sub-plots with four replications. The results revealed that different planting methods and irrigation schedules significantly influenced the seed yield of sunflower. Maximum seed yield (21.6 q/ha) recorded with SR method was 1.4, 11.6, 12.5 and 21.8% higher than SB, TR, CB and Flat methods, respectively. Among the irrigation schedules, maximum seed yield was obtained when crop was raised with irrigation scheduling at 1.2 IW/CPE (20.7 q/ha) which was statistically at par with 1.0 IW/CPE (20.2 q/ha) but significantly higher than 0.8 IW/CPE (17.8 q/ha). Water use in flat method was 2.5, 3.3, 4.4 and 5.1% higher than SR, TR, SB and TB, respectively.

21. A. GEETHA*, P. SAIDAIAH, A. SIVASANKAR, J. SURESH, LAKSHMI PRAYAGA AND G. ANURADHA [Moisture stress induced physiological and biochemical changes associated with biomass production in sunflower genotypes]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 85-93 (2012). Department of Plant Physiology Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Rajendranagar-500 030, Hyderabad (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at College Farm, College of Agriculture, ANGRAU, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad during rabi 2009-10 to study physiological and biochemical changes associated with biomass production in 12 sunflower genotypes under moisture stress. Moisture stress treatment was imposed at flower bud initiation stage (irrigation withheld from 40 to 60 DAS), whereas control plots were irrigated at 10 days intervals throughout the crop growth period. The data recorded on plant height, total leaf area, gas exchange parameters (photosynthetic rate, intracellular carbon dioxide concentration, transpiration rate and canopy temperature), total dry weight and seed yield per plant in selected inbred lines of sunflower. The results revealed that moisture stress at flower bud initiation stage reduced plant height, total leaf area, plant biomass photosynthetic rate and seed yield, whereas intracellular carbon dioxide concentration, transpiration rate and canopy temperature increased under moisture stress. Promising lines identified were SH-491 followed by DSF-111, RSF-107 and SH-177 for biomass, seed yield, lower intracellular CO2 concentration, ability to maintain transpiration rate even during stress and moderate photosynthetic performance.

22. SWAPANA SEPEHYA* AND S. K. SUBEHIA [Nitrogen dynamics as influenced by long-term fertilization and amendments under rice-wheat system in a north-western Himalayan soil]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 94-101 (2012). Department of Soil Science CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India *(e-mail : swapanasep@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The effect of long-term addition of chemical fertilizers along with organics was studied on different forms of nitrogen, after 17 years of continuous cropping of rice-wheat in an acid Alfisol. Continuous application of 50% N through green manure (Dhaincha)in kharif followed by 100% NPK in rabi (T10) recorded highest value of all the fractions of nitrogen which was significantly superior over control. Surface layer recorded higher content than sub-surface layer; however, the treatment wise effect was comparable. Different organic and inorganic fractions of nitrogen were positively and significantly correlated with organic carbon, CEC and available nitrogen status except unidentified-N. The highest degree of correlation in respect of organic carbon, CEC and available nitrogen was observed with hydrolysable ammonical-N followed by amino acid-N. Grain and straw yield of rice exhibited positive and significant correlation with all the fractions of nitrogen except unidentified-N indicating that this fraction is not contributing much towards yield. Similarly, nitrogen uptake in grain and straw of rice and total N uptake was also positively and significantly correlated with all the nitrogen fractions except unidentified-N indicating that this fraction is not contributing much towards the yield and uptake. The degree of correlation in respect of rice grain and straw yield and nitrogen uptake was highest with hydrolysable ammonical-N indicating maximum contribution of this fraction towards grain and straw yield. All the organic and inorganic fractions of nitrogen except unidentified-N were positively and significantly correlated among themselves showing interdependency of various chemical pools at both the depths. As regard the relationship of unidentified-N with other fractions, non significant relationship was observed with any of these fractions, indicating that this fraction is not contributing much towards these pools.

23. C. N. BYANNA AND I. N. DOREYAPPA GOWDA [Studies on standardization of RTS beverage production from sweet orange (Citrus sinensis var. sathgudi) and storage]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 102-108 (2012). Department of Horticulture University of Agricultural Sciences, G. K. V. K., Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out to standardize the recipe of sweet orange RTS beverage at processing laboratory in the Division of Post Harvest Technology, Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bangaluru from November 2008 to June 2009. The treatments included ready-to-serve sweet orange (var. sathgudi) beverages comprising varying amount of juice (10, 12, 15 and 18%) with fixed TSS and acidity of 15o Brix and 0.3%, respectively, with three replications. The RTS beverage was stored up to six months. The prepared juices were analysed for chemical composition and sensory quality attributes at 0, 3 and 6 months of storage at ambient conditions. During storage period, the TSS, acidity, reducing sugars and non-enzymatic browning were increased, while pH, total sugars, non-reducing sugars, ascorbic acid and antioxidant activity decreased considerably. In sensory evaluation, the RTS beverage comprising 18% juice, 15o Brix and 0.3% acidity was judged better than other recipes in terms of colour, taste and overall acceptability.

24. C. N. BYANNA AND I. N. DOREYAPPA GOWDA [Standardization of sweet orange and pomegranate blended RTS beverage preparation and its storage]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 109-115 (2012). Department of Horticulture University of Agricultural Sciences, G. K. V. K., Bangaluru-560 065 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted in processing laboratory in the Division of Post-Harvest Technology, Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bangaluru from November, 2008 to June, 2009 to standardize recipe for sweet orange and pomegranate blended RTS beverage production. Blended RTS beverage was prepared with 15% juice content of sweet orange and pomagranate at varying level of juice ratios of 90 : 10, 80 : 20, 70 : 30, 60 : 40 and 50 : 50 with fixed level TSS of 150 Brix and acidity of 0.3% and stored up to six months in ambient conditions. Blended beverages were evaluated for quality parameters and storage stability at different intervals of 0, 3 and 6 months after storage. Sweet orange and pomegranate were mixed at the ratio of 50 : 50 with 15% juice, TSS of 150 Brix and 0.3% acidity was found to be the best in taste and overall acceptability. During storage, the TSS, titratable acidity, reducing sugars and non-enzymatic browning increased, while pH, total sugars, non-reducing sugars, ascorbic acid and antioxidant activity decreased. The RTS beverage had storage stability up to six months.

25. H. Mani*, J. G. Ikeorgu,  S. G. Ado, I. U. Abubakar, A. A. Mukhtar and J. M. Jaliya [Performance of two water yam clones as influenced by different NPK fertilizer rates at Samaru, Nigeria]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 116-120 (2012). Department of Agronomy Institute for Agricultural Research Farm (IAR) Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria *(e-mail : kadawah@yahoo.co.uk.)

ABSTRACT

Two field trials were carried out at the Institute for Agricultural Research Farm, Samaru in the northern Guinea Savanna ecology during 2008 and 2009 wet seasons to evaluate the performance of two water yam hybrid clones (TDa-92-2 and TDa 00/00104) and five NPK fertilizer rates (0-0-0, 40-20-20, 80-40-40, 120-60-60 and 180-90-90 kg NPK/ha). The treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design and replicated three times. Results obtained showed that there was no significant difference between the two hybrid yam clones tested in all the growth and yield parameters assessed except establishment count at two months after planting (MAP) in 2009 when TDa-92-2 had high establishment count than TDa 00/00104 and total fresh tuber yield when TDa 00/00104 outyielded TDa-92-2, respectively. The effect of NPK fertilizer on the parameters assessed was not significant on establishment count in 2009, crop vigour in 2009, vine length in both the years, number of branches/plant, number of tubers/plot in both the years, number of seed yam in 2008, number of ware yam in 2008 and total fresh tuber yield in 2009 were not significant. However, increase in NPK fertilizer rates from 0-0-0 to 120-60-60 significantly enhanced seed yam in 2009, establishment count in 2008 at 2 MAP. Crop vigour in 2008, though was statistically at par with 80-40-40 kg NPK/ha. From the results obtained in this study it could be suggested that planting any of the water yam cultivars can be used to get good growth and yield of the crop using 80-40-40 kg NPK/ha.

26. Vaibhav K. Singh* and V. S. Pundhir [Expansion of late blight lesions in relation to fungicidal spray on different potato cultivars]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 121-124 (2012). Centre of Advance Studies in Plant Pathology G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : dr.singhvaibhav@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The observations on expansion of late blight lesions revealed that fastest lesion expansion was recorded on K. Bahar (average growth 2.67 cm2/day) followed by K. Ashoka (2.32 cm2 growth/day), while minimum lesion expansion on K. Jyoti (2.05 cm2 growth/day). Maximum lesion expansion was recorded in control plot of K. Bahar, K. Sutlej, K. Pukhraj and K. Jawahar, while mancozeb @ 0.2% sprayed plots showed minimum lesion expansion in all four potato cultivars. Fungicidal action was the most effective in slowing down the late blight lesion expansion.

27. Rajeev Kumar Narolia* and R. V. S. K. Reddy [Genetic divergence studies in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 125-128 (2012). College of Horticulture Andhra Pradesh Horticultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India *(e-mail : naroliarajeevkumar@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Fifty-five genotypes of tomato were studied for their genetic divergence using Mahalanobis D2 statistics at Hyderabad. Based on D2 values of 13 characters, genotypes were grouped into 12 highly divergent clusters. Some of genotypes were so divergent in all the characters; hence, each single genotype formed a separate cluster. Thus, eight clusters viz., III, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI and XII were solitary with one genotype in each cluster. The remaining four clusters were having maximum number of genotypes. Cluster II was biggest with 20 genotypes followed by cluster I (14 genotypes), while the other two clusters IV and V comprised six and seven genotypes, respectively. The maximum genetic divergence was observed between clusters IX and XII followed by between clusters V and IX. The maximum intra-cluster distance was shown by cluster V. Hence, the crosses of genotypes from clusters IX with cluster XII will result in the development of high acidity and early maturity variety. The characters viz., acidity content followed by shelf life, plant height, TSS, ascorbic acid content, average fruit weight and number of fruits per plant contributed greatly towards diversity.

28. S. Srividhya and V. Ponnuswamy [Correlation analysis in hybrid population of paprika (Capsicum annuum var. longum)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 129-134 (2012). Horticulture College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

In a correlation analysis with four sets of crosses and their parents, all the characters under study except per cent disease index were positively associated with dry fruit yield per plant. This suggests that least incidence of anthracnose would result in more dry fruit yield per plant. Total phenol content was found to possess a strong negative association with disease incidence in the crosses suggesting that total phenol plays a significant role in reducing disease incidence. Ascorbic acid, total extractable colour content and oleoresin were positively associated with total phenol content which imparts resistance thus paving way for simultaneous selection for yield, quality and resistance.

29. A. K. SRIVASTAVA*, H. K. JAISWAL and R. K. AGRAWAL [Genetics of grain quality traits in indigenous aromatic rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 135-140 (2012). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding Institute of Agricultural Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (U. P.), India *(e-mail : bhu.avinash@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The nature of gene action was analysed through generation mean analysis for grain quality traits in P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1 and BC2 generations of five crosses involving indigenous aromatic rice cultivars. The additive and dominance gene effects as well as epistatic interactions were present for most of the grain quality traits indicating their complex inheritance. Focus should be on improving individual characters separately based on the nature of gene action. Kernel length showed a preponderance of additive gene effect and additive x additive gene interaction, hence, pedigree method of selection would be useful in improving it. Kernel breadth could be improved through recurrent selection for few generations followed by pedigree breeding as both additive and dominance gene effect and i, and l type of interactions were important. For kernel length after cooking preponderance of dominance gene effect and epistatic interactions were observed. Biparental mating in F2 can be followed to improve the trait. Dominance gene effect and additive x additive and dominance x dominance gene interactions were important for alkali spread value and amylose content. Selection has to be postponed to later generation for improving these traits.

30. P. K. SINGH*, B. K. DHAKAD, H. B. SINGH and A. K. SINGH [Genetic variability and association analysis in rice (Oryza sativa L.) treated with Trichoderma harzianum]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 141-145 (2012). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding Institute of Agricultural Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (U. P.), India *(e-mail : pksbhu@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out to analyze the extant of genetic variability, heritability, genetic advance and character association for grain yield with yield attributing traits in treated rice with Trichoderma harzianum. Analysis of variance revealed considerable variability among the germplasms for all traits under study. Coefficients of genotypic and phenotypic variability were observed for most of the traits both in treated and their control plot. High heritability along with high genetic advance as per cent of mean was found in the trait number of grains per panicle. High heritability but low value of genetic advance for days to maturity, days to 50% flowering and panicle length in treated and their control plot. Results indicated that test weight, panicle length and number of tillers per plant had strong positive and significant association at genotypic as well as phenotypic level with grain yield per plot in treated and untreated both plots. Thus, selection based on these traits will be effective in improving the grain yield in rice along with seed treated with Trichoderma harzianum.

31. D. Adilakshmi* and M. Girija Rani [Variability, character association and path analysis in rice varieties under submergence]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 146-151 (2012). Andhra Pradesh Rice Research Institute and Regional Agricultural Research Station Maruteru-534 122, West Godavari District (Andhra Pradesh), India *(e-mail : adilakshmi 87@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Variability and heritability studies among the 64 genotypes revealed the existence of significant differences for all the characteristics indicating wide variability among the genotypes. Variability was found high in relative shoot elongation, while it was low in  days to 50% flowering among the genotypes under study. The characters viz., total shoot elongation, relative shoot elongation, plant survival per cent and grain yield per plant registered high heritability coupled with high genetic advance giving scope for phenotypic selection as additive gene action under submergence. Ear bearing tillers recorded low genetic advance along with heritability indicated that this character was highly influenced by environment. The association analysis indicated negative association of plant survival per cent  with total shoot elongation and relative shoot elongation, whereas positive association with yield per plant indicated its importance. Path analysis revealed that the traits viz., total shoot elongation, plant survival per cent, plant height at maturity, kernel length and test weight exhibited positive direct effects on grain yield per plant. The direct effects of  plant survival and test weight were more and hence these traits could be considered for getting good yield under submergence conditions.

32. P. VENKATA RAMANA RAO, V. GOURI SHANKAR*, J. V. P. PAVANI, V. RAJESH AND A. VISHNUVARDHAN REDDY [Genetic diversity analysis for drought tolerance in castor using EST SSR markers]. Crop Res. 44 (1&2) : 152-155 (2012). Regional Agricultural Research Station Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Palem-509 215 (A. P.), India *(e-mail: gouri_gene@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Study of genetic diversity of parents is important as the crossing of diverse parents likely to produce more heterotic hybrids and desirable combinations in segregating generations. In the present study genetically distinct 14 genotypes of castor (drought tolerant and susceptible) were screened using 10 EST SSR markers. Twenty-three alleles were detected and all were polymorphic. The number of alleles detected on a single locus ranged from 2 to 3 with an average of 2.3 alleles per locus. The allele size varied from 145 (REC SSR 44) to 273 bp (REC SSR 98). The PIC of EST SSR primers tested ranged from 0.43 to 0.59 with a mean of 0.51. UPGMA analysis showed that the 14 drought tolerant and susceptible castor genotypes were grouped into seven clusters with correlation coefficient ranged from 0.26 to 1.0.

33. K. JHANSI RANI AND S. S. RAO [Genetic diversity in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) for panicle components and morpho-physiological traits important for rabi adaptation]. Crop Res. 44 (1&2) : 156-160 (2012). Directorate of Sorghum Research (ICAR) Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Genetic divergence was analysed for 16 characters among 41 sorghum genotypes (mostly rabi) by using Mahalanobis D2 statistic. High genetic divergence was observed among the genotypes, which formed seven clusters. Clustering pattern revealed homogeneity of material within the cluster, to a large extent. The maximum inter-cluster distance was observed between clusters II and VII followed by II and VI. Contribution of morpho-physiological traits which are important for rabiadaptation, to the total diversity was much less compared to the contribution of panicle components.  Based on cluster mean values for important panicle components and morpho-physiological parameters and inter-cluster distance, diverse parents were suggested for crossing programme.

34. Tamoghna Saha, R. K. Patil and Nithya Chandran [Incidence of Apion amplum (Faust) (Apionidae : Coleoptera) on greengram with its biopesticidal management]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 161-167 (2012). Department of Agricultural Entomology University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580 005 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharifseason of 2008-09 at Main Research Station, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad. Seed weevil, Apion amplum (Faust) (Apionidae : Coleoptera) has gained a major pest status on greengram and blackgram in recent years. The incidence studies revealed that A. amplum (Faust) was in peak activity on the crop sown in first fortnight of July and recorded the highest mean numbers of weevils (4.57 and 4.70/plant) followed by second fortnight of July. Evaluation of different biopesticides revealed that the application of Bacillus thuringiensis (Sandiego)@ 1 ml/l recorded cent per cent mortality compared to other biopesticides after 11 days of observation under laboratory condition. In field also, B. thuringiensis was found superior in reducing mean weevil numbers, pod and seed damage to greengram and recorded highest yield over other biopesticides.

35. Vaibhav K. Singh* and V. S. Pundhir [Occurrence of physiological races of Phytophthora infestans around local areas of Pantnagar]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 168-170 (2012). Centre of Advance Studies in Plant Pathology G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : dr.singhvaibhav@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The Phytophthora infestans isolates collected around local areas of Pantnagar during 2005-07 cropping season were analyzed for identification of physiological races by using 20 host differential sets, established the occurrence of seven different high spectrum physiologic races among the 16 isolates of P. infestans tested. These races were, namely, 1.2.4.6.7.11, 1.2.3.4.8.10.11, 1.2.3.7.8.10.11, 1.2.3.4.5.7.8.10, 1.2.3.4.7.8.10.11, 1.2.3.4.6.7.8.9.10 and 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10 with six gene, seven gene, eight gene, nine gene and 10 gene complex. All the physiologic races around local areas of Pantnagar belonged to A1 mating type of P. infestans.

36. Vaibhav K. Singh* and V. S. Pundhir [Detection of metalaxyl resistance in Phytophthora infestans isolates at Pantnagar]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 171-173 (2012). Centre of Advance Studies in Plant Pathology G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : dr.singhvaibhav@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Results of the studies revealed that resistance to metalaxyl gave positive results as they exhibited met-resistance up to both 5 and 100 ppm having ³40% growth as compared to 0 ppm (control) in all P. infestans isolates of potato cultivars. Among the four P. infestans isolates, potato cultivar K. Bahar showed the race 1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9 with 10 gene complex, while other three potato cultivars (K. Badshah, K. Jawahar and K. Sutlej) showed race 1.2.3.4.5.7.8.10 with 8 gene complex. No oospores were formed in pairings of any of the P. infestans isolates of four potato cultivars for identification of mating type, indicating that all the isolates belonged to A1 mating type and at Pantnagar, A2 mating type was not encountered till 2007.

37. Manisha Srivastava, U. P. Gupta and Asha Sinha [Influence of bean common mosaic virus infection on chlorophyll content and primary productivity in hyacinth bean (Dolichos lablab L.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 174-181 (2012). Department of Botany, Harish Chandra P. G. College, Varanasi-221 001 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Dolichos lablab L. crop is infected by bean common mosaic virus. This included crinkling and rolling of leaves. Leaves usually have an irregular mosaic pattern of light yellow and green areas were observed. Experiment was conducted to find out the influence of bean common mosaic virus on the chlorophyll content and primary productivity in healthy and diseasedhyacinth bean plant at different intervals 15th, 30th, 45th, 60th and 75th days. The chlorophyll ‘a’, chlorophyll ‘b’ and total chlorophyll contents were always lesser in the leaves of infected plants as compared to healthy ones. The chlorophyll content estimated on per gram basis increased with age of the plants irrespective of infection. Primary productivity of diseased plants was reduced with corresponding decrease in the net production. Respiration rate in Hyacinth bean leaves infected with the virus was always more than their comparable healthy samples.

38. M. Sree Rekha* and T. Pradeep [Performance of Bt cotton hybrid (RCH-2) at different plant densities and scheduling of nitrogen under rainfed conditions]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 182-185 (2012). A. N. G. R. A. U. Agricultural Research Station, Adilabad-504 002 (A. P.), India *(e-mail : msreerekha@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted to find out suitable plant density and scheduling of nitrogen to Bt cotton hybrid, RCH-2 under rainfed conditions of Northern Telangana Region of Andhra Pradesh during 2006-07 and 2007-08 at Agricultural Research Station, Adilabad in soils where available nitrogen was low. Results indicated that higher plant density of 27,777 plants/ha gave maximum seed cotton yield of 2278 kg/ha than lower plant densities of 18518 and 13888 plants/ha. Similarly, scheduling of nitrogen in five equal splits starting from 15 days after sowing (DAS)  at 15 days interval gave higher seed cotton yield of 2386 kg/ha over recommended nitrogen application at 30, 60 and 90 DAS with 1825 kg/ha.

39. B. SRINIVAS, M. V. BRAHMESWARA RAO AND M. GOPINATH [Combining ability studies for yield and yield component traits in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 186-189 (2012). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding College of Agriculture, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Combining ability analysis for seed cotton yield and yield components was studied in a L x T fashion using seven lines and eight testers of upland cotton. Non-additive gene action was found to be important in the inheritance of all the traits studied. Parents CPD 420, Galama and  LK 861 were identified as good general combiners for yield and one or more yield contributing characters, whereas the crosses NA 1325 x L 604, AKH 9331 x HAG 1055, CPD 420 x JK 344 and NA 1325 x 4084 recorded high specific combining ability effects for yield and yield contributing characters. Aforementioned parents and crosses could be utilized for further selection of high yield.

40. URMIMALA HAZARIKA, S. K. BARTHAKUR AND R. CHAKRAVARTY [Performance of certain medicinal and aromatic plants as intercrops in som (Persea bombycina Kost.) plantations]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 190-193 (2012). Central Muga Eri Research & Training Institute, Lahdoigarh, Jorhat (Assam), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during 2007-10 at Lahdoigarh, Jorhat, Assam to study the performance of Stevia [Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) Hemsl.], Brahmi [Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wetts.] and Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin Benth.) as intercrops with Som (Persea bombycina Kost.),a host plant of muga silkworm (Antheraea assamensis Helfer).  The growth and yield of these plants as intercrops under shade of Persea bombycina Kost. were compared to those grown as sole crops under open condition. All three crops showed relatively higher values in case of survival percentage under shade of Persea bombycina Kost. than open condition. Plant height, plant spread, leaf area index (LAI), fresh and dry herb yield, net return and benefit : cost ratio (BCR) of P. cablin Benth. and B. monnieri (L.) Wetts. were also higher in shade condition than open condition which indicated that P. cablin Benth. and B. monnieri (L.) Wetts. preferred partial shade for better growth and yield which indicated possibility of growing these plants as intercrops in existing matured P. bombycina Kost. plantations. In case of S. rebaudiana (Bertoni) Hemsl., there was significant reduction in growth, yield, net return and BCR in shade compared to open condition. The highest BCR of 1.91 was recorded with P. cablin Benth.under shadeagainst 1.61 in open condition. However,  BCR of B. monnieri (L.) Wetts. (1.51 as intercrop) and S. rebaudiana (Bertoni) Hemsl. (1.62 as intercrop) envisaged the possibility of growing these two plants also in the interspaces of P. bombycina Kost. plantations as an additional source of income to the muga farmers.

41. M. PALANIKUMAR and K. RAJAMANI [Evaluation of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.)  genotypes for fresh, dry biomass yield and oil content under different seasons]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 194-202 (2012). Department of Vegetable Crops Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Periyakulam-625 604 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

The present study was carried out at Department of Spices and Plantation Crops, Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore during three seasons viz., season I (June 2008-August 2008), season II (October 2008-December 2008) and season III (June 2009-August 2009). From the study on mean performance of genotypes, based on various growth, yield and quality attributing traits of genotypes viz., CS 101 (20.50, 23.25 and 13.35 g, respectively), UD 685 (15.18, 19.51 and 10.45 g, respectively) and CS 136 (13.53, 10.89 and 9.46 g, respectively) were identified as high yielding leafy types during three seasons. Whereas CS 101 (4.10, 4.65 and 2.67 g, respectively) and CS 685 (3.04, 3.90 and 2.09 g, respectively) recorded the maximum dry herbage yield during all three seasons. During the first, second and third season, CS 101 recorded the maximum content of oil (0.54, 0.54 and 0.54%, respectively), followed by UD 685 (0.47, 0.48 and 0.47%, respectively) and CS 136 (0.44, 0.43 and 0.43%, respectively). These genotypes can be used successfully for further breeding programmes.

42. A. S. TETARWAL, ASHOK SHARMA AND V. K. AGARWAL [Effect of different nitrogen doses on the incidence of Hyadaphis coriandri (Das)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 203-204 (2012). Department of Agricultural Entomology and Zoology, S. K. N. College of agriculture, Jobner-303 329 (Rajasthan), India

ABSTRACT

Effect of five different doses of nitrogen was observed on the incidence of aphid, Hyadaphis coriandri (Das) on coriander. The data revealed that peak population was recorded in the eight standard meteorological weeks. The maximum incidence was observed on 150% of RDN, while minimum was recorded in untreated check. The maximum yield was obtained in the treatment of 100% of RDN, minimum in untreated check. A positive correlation was found between different doses of nitrogen and aphid population and seed yield.

43. A. S. TETARWAL, ASHOK SHARMA AND V. K. AGARWAL [Varietal screening of coriander for resistance against, Hyadaphis coriandri (Das)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 205-207 (2012). Department of Agricultural Entomology and Zoology, S. K. N. College of agriculture, Jobner-303 329 (Rajasthan), India.

ABSTRACT

Eight varieties/entries of coriander were screened for their relative susceptibility to aphid, Hyadaphis coriandri (Das) and none was found immune to the aphid attack. Based on the statistical categorization, the varieties/entries RCr-436 and RCr-684 were categorized as less susceptible. The varieties/entries UD-728 and RCr-41 were highly susceptible.

44. M. PALANIKUMAR and K. RAJAMANI [Physiological and biochemical analysis of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) genotypes under different seasons]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 208-216 (2012). Department of Vegetable Crops Horticultural College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Periyakulam-625 604 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out at Department of Spices and Plantation Crops, Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore during three seasons viz., season I (June 2008-August 2008), season II (October 2008-December 2008) and season III (June 2009-August 2009). From the study on mean performance of different genotypes, CS 101 recorded highest chlorophyll ‘a’ (0.669, 0.359 and 0.424 mg), ascorbic acid content (195.14, 156.45 and 149.08 mg), leaf calcium content (195.03, 205.30 and 197.52 mg) and leaf iron content (1.97, 1.93 and 1.84 mg) under three seasons. However, CS 88 recorded highest chlorophyll ‘b’ under three seasons (0.859, 0.857 and 0.706 mg). CS 18 recorded maximum leaf protein content (4.36, 4.49 and 4.11 g) under all the three seasons. These genotypes can be used successfully in breeding programmes to improve the quality of coriander genotypes.

45. M. PALANIKUMAR, K. RAJAMANI and A. R. MUTHIAH [Correlation studies in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.)  genotypes for fresh biomass yield and oil content under different seasons]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 217-221 (2012). Department of Vegetable Crops Horticultural College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Periyakulam-625 604 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation to study the fresh yield, dry bimass yield and quality traits was carried out at Department of Spices and Plantation Crops, Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore during three seasons viz., season I (June 2008-August 2008), season II (October 2008-December 2008) and season III (June 2009-August 2009). From the study on mean performance of genotypes, the biomass yield showed positive significant association with plant height, number of branches, number of leaves, weight of leaves, weight of stem and weight of root during all the three seasons. Significant correlation of the biomass yield suggests the scope of direct effective selections for further improvement. These characters emerged as the most important associates of biomass yield in coriander.

46. M. PALANIKUMAR, K. RAJAMANI and A. R. MUTHIAH [Path coefficient analysis in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) genotypes for fresh biomass yield under different seasons]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 222-226 (2012). Department of Vegetable Crops Horticultural College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Periyakulam-625 604 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out at Department of Spices and Plantation Crops, Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore during three seasons viz., season I (June 2008-August 2008), season II (October 2008-December 2008) and season III (June 2009-August 2009). From the results of the path coefficient analysis, plant height, number of branches, number of leaves, fresh weight of leaves, weight of stem and weight of root exerted the maximum positive direct effect on yield of biomass.

47. M. PALANIKUMAR, K. RAJAMANI and A. R. MUTHIAH [Intra- and inter-cluster distance analysis in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) genotypes under different seasons]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 227-231 (2012). Department of Vegetable Crops Horticultural College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Periyakulam-625 604 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out at Department of Spices and Plantation Crops, Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore during three seasons viz., season I (June 2008-August 2008), season II (October 2008-December 2008) and season III (June 2009-August 2009). From the results of intra- and inter-cluster distance analysis, during first season, cluster I comprising 61 genotypes had the highest intra-cluster distance followed by cluster III with five genotypes. In the second season, cluster I comprising 68 genotypes had the highest intra-cluster distance followed by cluster II with three genotypes. During the third season also, cluster I comprising 64 genotypes had the highest intra-cluster distance followed by clusters II and IV with three genotypes. Considering the inter-cluster distances, it was the highest between clusters II and X during the first season. In the second season, inter-cluster distance was the highest between clusters II and V. In the third season, inter-cluster distance was the highest between clusters V and VIII.  Also, the mean performance of green yield and other important contributing characters such as plant height, number of branches, number of leaves, weight of leaves, weight of stem, weight of root and biomass yield was the highest for clusters X, V and VIII in first, second and third seasons. Keeping this in view, it appears that clusters X (CS 101), V (CS 101, UD 685) and VIII (CS 101) during first, second and third seasons, would exhibit high heterosis as well as high level of production, involved in the hybridization programme.

48. M. PALANIKUMAR, K. RAJAMANI and D. UMA [Molecular marker studies in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 232-237 (2012). Department of Vegetable Crops Horticultural College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Periyakulam-625 604 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out at Department of Spices and Plantation Crops, Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore during the period from 2008-09. From the study, mean performance of genotypes, the polymorphism shown by 10 primers varied from 38 to 71%. A total of 106 bands were obtained with 10 primers and were used for the analysis of genetic diversity. Among the 75 genotypes of coriander, all the genotypes of coriander exhibited a characteristic amplification profile, which can be used for documentation of genotypes. The genotypes CS 70, CS 101 and UD 685 were found to be highly diverse. A dendrogram representing the genetic relationship among the 75 genotypes based on RAPDs was developed. From the results of D2 analysis and RAPD profiles, it was observed that genotypes CS 101 and UD 685 were more genetic diverse and the results inferred that these two genotypes would be useful in further breeding programme for developing new variety with high biomass yield.

49. M. PALANIKUMAR, K. RAJAMANI AND A. R. MUTHIAH [Genetic divergence (D2) and relative contribution analysis in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) genotypes under different seasons]. Crop Res. 44 (1&2) : 238-242 (2012). Department of Vegetable Crops Horticultural College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Periyakulam-625 604 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out at Department of Spices and Plantation Crops, Horticultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore during three seasons viz., season I (June 2008-August 2008), season II (October 2008-December 2008) and season III (June 2009-August 2009). From the results of the genetic divergence analysis, during first season, cluster I comprising 61 genotypes had the highest intra-cluster distance followed by cluster III with five genotypes. In the second season, cluster I comprising 68 genotypes had the highest intra-cluster distance followed by cluster II with three genotypes. During the third season also, cluster I comprising 64 genotypes had the highest intra-cluster distance followed by clusters II and IV with three genotypes. During the first season, maximum contribution to genetic divergence was made by fresh weight of root (36.47%). In the second season, maximum contribution to genetic divergence was made by dry weight of stem (23.35%). During the third season, maximum contribution to genetic divergence was made by fresh weight of leaves (47.75%).

50. GAURA PANDEY, RAJSHREE PANDEY, KAMLESH AHIRWAR AND K. N. NAMDEO [Effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on nutrient contents and uptake of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 243-245 (2012). Department of Botany Government Girls P. G. College, Rewa-486 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rainy-cum-winter seasons of 2009-10 and 2010-11 to study the effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on nutrient contents and uptake of turmeric var. PCT-8. Poultry manure @ 5 t/ha recorded highest N, P and K contents in turmeric rhizomes equally followed by vermicompost and then pig manure each @ 5 t/ha. Vermicompost producing 101.78 q/ha fresh rhizomes took up the maximum nutrients (161.65 kg N, 54.16 kg P and 110.53 kg K/ha). In case of inorganic sources, 100% RDF (N180P60K120) producing maximum 101.82 q rhizomes/ha resulted in highest percentage of NPK contents as well as their uptake per hectare. The combined input (organic x inorganic sources) further augmented the uptake of these nutrients. In case of rhizome yield, the treatment interactions were non-significant. The findings suggest that due to heavy withdrawal of nutrients by turmeric crop as a result of improved production technology, the succeeding crops must be nourished properly based on soil test values.

51. GAURA PANDEY, RAJSHREE PANDEY, KAMLESH AHIRWAR AND K. N. NAMDEO [Effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on growth and yield of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.)]. Crop Res. 44(1&2): 246-249 (2012). Department of Botany Government Girls P. G. College, Rewa-486 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rainy-cum-winter seasons of 2009-10 and 2010-11 to study the effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on growth and yield of turmeric var. PCT-8. Amongst the applied organic sources of nutrients, farm yard manure (FYM) @ 10 t/ha resulted in maximum growth, yield attributes, yield and net income. The maximum fresh yield of rhizomes was 103.81 q/ha with additional net income (Rs. 23600/ha) over control. Application of 100% recommended inorganic sources of nutrients (N180P60K120) yielded 101.82 q/ha with additional net income (Rs.10300/ha) over control. Thus, FYM was found most remunerative under  the existing agro-climatic conditions of Vindhya region of Madhya Pradesh.

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