Volume 20, Number 3(2000)

By | July 19, 2014

Titles of research papers/articles alongwith their abstracts.
For full text, please contact to Editor-in-chief at :
md@cropresearh.org


1. HARBIR SINGH AND KEITH T. INGRAM [Sensitivity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) to water deficit at three growth stages]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 355-359 (2000). Agronomy, Plant Physiology and Agro-ecology, The International Rice Research Institute, P. O. Box 933, Manila, Philippines

ABSTRACT

Rice (Oryza sativa L.) cvs. IR 20, IR 46 and IR 76, grown in black PVC pots in naturally illuminated greenhouse at the International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Philippines, were subjected to four water deficit treatments : (i) watering to maintain saturated soil moisture conditions throughout the experiment, (ii) no watering during vegetative stage (16 to 48 days after seeding_DAS), (iii) no watering during reproductive (panicle initiation) stage (35 to 65 DAS), and (iv) no watering during boot to grain fill stage (70 to 86 DAS). Different durations of water deficit for three growth stages resulted from our criterion to end the stress when leaf-rolling score was five for most sensitive cultivar. IR 72 produced higher biomass plant-1, better yield components (panicle plant-1, filled spikelets plant-1, panicle weight and 100-grain weight) and higher yield plant-1 than IR 46 and IR 20 under well-watered control and vegetative and reproductive (panicle initiation) stresses. Sensitivity to water deficit during boot to grain fill stage in term of grain yield (s) of three rice varieties was almost identical. Although water deficit during boot to grain fill stage caused greatest yield reduction (77%), water stress during three growth stages all reduced values for grain yield components, grain yield, seasonal evapotranspiration and water use efficiency

2. R. B. SINGANDHUPE, P. S. B. ANAND AND K. KANNAN [Effect of rainfall pattern on rice productivity in state of Orissa]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 360-366 (2000). Water Technology Centre for Eastern Region, Bhubaneswar-751 023 (Orissa), India

ABSTRACT

Rice is major cereal crop of Orissa. This crop grows well under varying soil water environment i. e. hygric, mesoxeric and xeric; however, due to excess rain water and poor drainage facility in lowland area and sometimes prolonged dry spell, rice crop is severely affected due to natural calamities and reduces overall productivity. To evaluate the impact of rainfall distribution on rice productivity of Orissa, the districts were broadly classified into eastern ghat zone, coastal tract, central table land and northern plateau and the rice productivity of 1997-98 was regressed with rainfall received during kharif (June-November) and summer (January-May) seasons. In eastern ghat zone, Malakangiri district had the lowest productivity of 726 and 650 kg/ha rice yield during kharif and summer season, respectively, but the lowest rainfall of 917.3 and 169.5 mm was recorded in Rayagarh district. The highest productivity of rice (1379.9 and 1699 kg/ha) and rainfall (1417.7 and 241 mm) in corresponding season were recorded in Phulbani district. In this zone, the rice productivity during summer season was 7.2% higher than kharif season. Similarly, the relationship (r) between rainfall and productivity was 0.60, 0.41 and 0.41 in annual, kharif and summer, respectively. In coastal districts, the rainfall was quite excess during kharif and due to easy availability of ground water during summer season, rice productivity was 28.8% higher than kharif season. Due to waterlogged condition in some district, the impact of rainfall on productivity was in negative trend with r value of -0.315, -0.345 and -0.401 in annual, kharif and summer, respectively. In central table land, the contribution of 83.7 to 94.7% rainfall during kharif season in different districts resulted in higher productivity of rice and the correlation coefficient was 0.74 but during summer season, though the productivity was 32% higher than kharif season, the correlation coefficient was in negative trend (-0.33). Hence, higher productivity during summer season in this zone could be of irrigation water available with the farmers from minor tank, tube well, open wells, etc. In northern plateau, the productivity of rice during kharif was 1226 kg/ha as against 1745 kg/ha during summer season as the distribution of the rainfall was 81-87.7% during kharif and 13.3-16.0% during summer. The relationship between rice productivity and rainfall during kharif and summer seasons was 0.69 and -0.0927, respectively.

3. R. L. DHURANDHER, P. KHANNA AND R. S. TRIPATHI [Response of early rice cultivar to method of seeding and N levels under agro-ecological situation of eastern Madhya Pradesh]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 367-371 (2000). Department of Agronomy, Indira Gandhi Agricultural University, Raipur-492 012 (M. P.) India

ABSTRACT

An experiment on early rice under medium land condition was conducted during the wet seasons of 1996 and 1997 at the Instructional Farm, Indira Gandhi Agricultural University, Raipur (Madhya Pradesh) to see the effect of method of seeding and N levels on yield components, yield, economics and N uptake by rice. Results revealed that both the methods of rice seeding i. e. line sowing and broadcast biasi produced similar effect on productivity, net profit and N uptake by rice. Use of nitrogen at 120 kg/ha brought about a significant increase in grain yield over 40 and 80 kg N/ha. This was due to a significantly higher growth, yield components and N uptake by rice at that level. Higher net return (Rs. 12743/ha) and benefit : cost ratio (1.68) were also obtained with 120 kg N/ha.

4. I. K. MARIGA, M. JONGA AND O. A. CHIVINGE [The effect of timing of application of basal and topdressing fertilizers on maize (Zea mays L.) yield at two rates of basal fertilizer]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 372-380 (2000). Department of Crop Science, University of Zimbabwe, P. O. Box MP 167, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe

ABSTRACT

The experiment which focussed on the management of both basal and topdressing fertilizers was conducted at Domboshava Training Centre in the 1994-95 and 1995-96 rainy seasons. The experiment had two basal fertilizer rates (150 and 300 kg ha-1 of compound D), three application times [at planting, 2 and 4 weeks after crop emergence (WACE)] and three ammonium nitrate (AN) topdressing times [5 WACE, initiation of tasselling (IT) and splitting_half at 5 WACE plus half at IT]. The rate of AN applied was 250 kg ha-1. In the drier 1994-95 season, there were no significant (P<0.05) treatment effects on maize yield. This was attributed to the lower and poorly distributed rainfall. In the wetter 1995-96 season, the basal fertilizer applied at planting or at 2 WACE gave similar maize yields (6931 and 6761 kg ha-1, respectively), and both outyielded that applied at 4 WACE (6213 kg ha-1). There were significant (P<0.05) interaction effects between the basal fertilizer rate and AN application time. Application of 300 kg ha-1 of compound D resulted in higher grain yield when AN was applied at IT. An economic analysis indicated that the lower rate of compound D was economically viable and that split application of AN was uneconomic because of the higher labour costs. These results were attributed to the higher inherent soil fertility of the site compared to most of the smallholder (SH) sector soils.

5. K. SRINIVASULU, R. P. SINGH AND K. MADHAVI [Economics of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) based intercropping systems under varied planting patterns in dry lands of eastern U. P.]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 381-386 (2000). Department of Agronomy, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005, India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Dryland Research Farm, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India during the rainy seasons of 1996-97 and 1997-98. Pigeonpea based intercropping systems involving three intercrops (blackgram, sesame and okra) and three planting patterns of pigeonpea (60 cm normal planting, 30+90 cm paired row planting and 40+80 cm paired row planting) were studied for their system, productivity and economics. The performance of pigeonpea was not markedly affected, when it was intercropped with either blackgram or sesame. However, okra grown as intercrop with pigeonpea reduced the pigeonpea grain yields significantly. Despite reduced pigeonpea grain yield, the pigeonpea (60 cm) +okra intercropping system recorded the highest pigeonpea equivalent yield. The pigeonpea equivalent yield, gross returns as well as net returns observed with all the intercropping systems were higher than their respective sole crops. The highest gross returns were obtained when pigeonpea (60 cm) was grown with okra as intercrop. However, the higher net returns, benefit : cost ratio, value : cost ratio and monetary advantage index values were observed with pigeonpea+sesame intercropping systems, irrespective of the planting pattern of the pigeonpea.

6. S. K. KARIKARI AND M. N. KANI [The effects of mulching on growth and yield of Bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc] in Botswana]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 387-396 (2000). Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana College of Agriculture, P. Bag 0027, Gaborone, Botswana

ABSTRACT

Mulching effects on the environment of the seed zone and growth and yield of Bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc] were studied in the field at Sebele, Botswana, during the 1996-97 and 1997-98 cropping seasons. The randomised complete block experiment had six treatments, namely, three Bambara groundnut landraces, grown with or without mulch. Provision of mulch significantly hastened seedling emergence and increased growth and yield. This improvement in overall performance due to increased soil moisture and decreased maximum soil temperatures provided a more stable environment for seedling emergence, growth and yield than unmulched soil.

7. S. K. KARIKARI, C. BAGAI AND A. SEGWAGWE [Allelopathic activity of five Botswana weed species on Bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc] and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 397-406 (2000). Department of Crop Science and Production, Botswana College of Agriculture, P. Bag 0027, Gaborone, Botswana

ABSTRACT

Laboratory, greenhouse and field experiments were conducted to investigate the allelopathic activity of five common Botswana weed species, namely, Cynodon dactylon, Datura ferox, Argemone mexicana, Bidens pilosa and Cyperus rotundus on Bambara groundnut [Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc] and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]. All the weed species exhibited allelopathic effects on the two crops to varying degrees. Seed germination, radicle and plumule lengths, seedling survival and seedling dry weights were affected by the weed leached extracts under laboratory conditions. Plant height, leaf area and shoot dry weight were reduced by non-leached residues of the weeds under greenhouse and field conditions. The results of this study suggest that the weed residues may affect Bambara groundnut and sorghum growth and development because of the inhibitory effects of allelochemicals present in them. The results may also explain the poor crop growth and yield observed in Bambara groundnut and sorghum cropping systems in Botswana. Further investigations are needed to identify the inhibitory substances present in these weeds.

8. M. K. KAUSHIK AND A. K. CHAUBEY [Response of rainy season bunch groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) to row spacing and seed rate]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 407-410 (2000). G. B. P. U. A. & T. Research Station, Ujhani-243 639 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field study was conducted at Research Station, Ujhani during kharif 1996 and 1997 on a soil loamy sand in texture with groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cv. Kaushal (G 201) to ascertain the effect of row spacing and seed rate on the production potential. the results revealed that potential production from bunch groundnut could be secured by keeping inter-row spacing of 30 cm with the seed rate of 100 kg kernel/ha under the agro-climatic condition of mid-western plains of U. P. Row spacing and seed rate did not affect shelling per cent and oil content in groundnut significantly.

9. H. R. KHAFI, B. B. RAMANI, ASHA C. MEHTA and K. V. PETHANI [Effects of different levels of nitrogen, phosphorus and spacing on yield and economics of hybrid bajra]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 411-414 (2000). Millet Research Station, Gujarat Agricultural University, Jamnagar-361 006, India

ABSTRACT

The results of an experiment conducted on medium black soil of Jamnagar during kharif seasons of 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996 revealed that the highest grain yield (2104, 2266 and 2085 kg ha-1), fodder yield (3183, 3494 and 3213 kg ha-1) and net return (Rs. 12322, 12380 and 11540 ha-1) were obtained when the crop was sown at 60 cm apart with 120 kg N and 40 kg P2O5 ha-1 fertilization, respectively, though the grain and fodder yield recorded at application of 80 and 120 kg N ha-1 remained statistically at par as well as application of 80 kg N ha-1 recorded the maximum ICBR (1 : 7.39).

10. V. SURYANARAYANA REDDY, V. SHANKARANARAYANA, N. JANAKIRAMAN, T. N. V. GOWDA, P. VENKATARAMANA AND SIVAPPA [Effect of wind breaks for improving productivity of crops in arable lands in eastern dry zone of Karnataka] Crop Res. 20 (3) : 415-419 (2000). Agricultural Research Station, Chintamani, Kolar District (Karnataka) India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted in the eastern dry zone of Karnataka at Agricultural Research Station, Chintamani, Kolar District comprising four forest tree species as wind breaks with three planting methods to evaluate for their growth and development in association with mango for improving the crop production in arable lands. Growth parameters viz., tree height, stem girth, canopy spread and wind velocity of forest tree species and mango and the effect of wind breaks on mango crop were also studied over eight years (1990-97). Casuarina was the best wind break followed by Acacia auriculiformis and Silver oak. Three rows of wind breaks were found to increase the growth and yield of mango crop.

11. AVTAR SINGH [Nitrogen response of some promising and newly released varieties of sugarcane in Punjab]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 420-425 (2000). PAU Regional Research Station, Kheri, Sangrur-148 001 (Punjab), India

ABSTRACT

Field studies were carried out to see the performance of new sugarcane varieties and also to find out the optimum dose of nitrogen to get the higher productivity of sugarcane at Regional Research Station, Kheri (Sangrur), Punjab during 1997-98 and 1998-99. The results revealed that the new varieties such as CoJ-86, CoJ-85 and CoJ-87 produced the significantly higher commercial cane sugar and cane yield than those obtained from the check CoJ-64 variety. The nitrogen application of 150 kg ha-1 gave the significantly higher commercial cane sugar and cane yield over the application of 100 kg N ha-1 but the further increase in nitrogen from 150 to 200 kg ha-1 decreased the commercial cane sugar and yield during both the years.

12. K. S. GREWAL, DEVENDER SINGH, S. C. MEHTA, Y. P. SINGH AND M. S. KUHAD [Effect of long-term fertilizer application on crop yields, nutrient uptake and available soil nutrients under different cropping sequences]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 426-436 (2000). Department of Soil Science, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

ABSTRACT

The study was conducted on a long-term fertilizer experiment in progress at CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar since 1979 with three crop rotations i. e. pearlmillet-wheat, guar-wheat and jowar-wheat. Since its inception the experiment has been given four levels of potassium (i. e. 0, 30, 60 and 90 kg K2O ha-1) and two levels of phosphorus (i. e. 0 and 60 kg P2O5 ha-1). Addition of phosphorus @ 60 kg P2O5 ha-1 significantly increased the grain and straw yields of pearlmillet, guar and jowar (fodder) crops over their respective controls. The application of potassium both in presence and absence of phosphorus also significantly increased the yields of all the three crops upto 60 kg K2O ha-1 application. Wheat grown after pearlmillet, guar and jowar also produced more grain and straw yields with the application of both 60 kg P2O5 and 60 kg K2O ha-1. However, the responses with respect to K application were statistically non-significant. The total annual removals of N, P and K were higher by pearlmillet-wheat rotation than guar-wheat and jowar-wheat rotations. After 18 years of continuous cropping the available K status of the soil decreased from an initial level of 754 kg ha-1 to around 268 kg ha-1 in control. Even the addition of 90 kg K2O ha-1 in every crop could not sustain the K status of the soil. The available P status of the soil reduced by 50% of its initial level (24 kg ha-1) in plots where no phosphorus was added. Application of 60 kg P2O5 ha-1 per crop helped in maintaining the available P status of the soil to its original level.

13. S. K. RANA, DAYA RAM AND V. N. GARLAPURI [Soils in semi-arid zone of Haryana]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 437-443 (2000). Department of Soil Science, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

ABSTRACT

By using remote sensing technique (aerial photographs and satellite imageries), different macro- and micro-landforms in northern part of Bhiwani district (Haryana) were identified and delineated. The eight landform units identified were : (i) level alluvial plain, (ii) eroded alluvial plain, (iii) undulating alluvial plain, (iv) aggraded fluvio-aeolian plain, (v) levelled alluvial plain, (vi) old alluvial plain with eolian cover, (vii) aeolian plain with occasional dunes and (viii) dunal plains. In each landform, one representative soil profile was studied for the morphological, physical and chemical characteristics. A perusal of different weathering parameters showed that most of these soils were of recent nature. Clay weathering (IW) and clay/silt ratio showed better relation with soil development and weathering intensities. Microscopic examination of soil mineral grains as light and heavy minerals confirmed the heterogeneity of soil and initial parent material with mild weathering. The light and heavy minerals identified were as under :

Light minerals : Quartz<muscovite<orthoclase feldspars<plagioclase feldspars.

Heavy minerals : Hornblende<chlorite<biotite<epidote<tourmaline<zircan

<actinolite tremolite<garnet<apatite<sphene.

The soils were classified according to Soil Survey Staff (1975) and the major soils were : Coarse loamy, Typic Camborthids, Coarse loamy, Typic Calciorthids, Typic Torripsamments, Typic Ustipsamments and Coarse loamy, Typic Ustorthents.

14. D. BASAVARAJAIAH, M. BYRE GOWDA, H. C. LOHITHASWA AND R. S. KULKARNI [Assessment of pigeonpea germplasm and isolation of elite genotypes for Karnataka]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 444-448 (2000). All India Co-ordinated Pulse Improvement Project, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065, India


ABSTRACT

Genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance for 16 characters in 81 genotypes of pigeonpea were studied. High amounts of phenotypic and genotypic coefficient of variations were observed for days to 50% flowering, straw weight, pods per plant, yield per plant and length of pod bearing branches. High heritability coupled with high genetic advance was observed for days to 50% flowering, straw weight, yield per plant, length of pod bearing branches and 100-seed weight indicating that additive gene effects were operating for these characters. Based on the mean performance of the genotypes, Japan Super, C-11, KE-71, TTB-7, ICPL-87091, ES-90 and BDN-69 could be chosen for further improvement of grain yield, sicne they exhibited superiority for most of the characters.

15. S. R. DASH AND P. C. KOLE [Association analysis of seed yield and its components in fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.)]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 449-452 (2000). Department of Crop Improvement, Horticulture and Agricultural Botany, Palli Siksha Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Sriniketan-731 236 (W. B.), India

ABSTRACT

Correlation and path analysis were studied in a population of 15 genotypes of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.). Pods per plant, grains per pod, straw yield, biological yield and harvest index showed significantly positive correlations with grain yield per plant at both genotypic and phenotypic levels. Path coefficient analysis indicated direct positive effect of straw yield, test weight, grains per pod and pods per plant on grain yield per plant.

16. S. ASHOK, N. MOHAMED SHERIFF AND S. LAKSHMI NARAYANAN [Character association and path coefficient analysis in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 453-456 (2000). Department of Agricultural Botany, T. N. A. U. Agricultural college & Research Institute, Madurai-625 104, India

ABSTRACT

The studies on correlation and path coefficient analysis in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) showed that yield per plant was positively and significantly correlated with plant height, diameter of the stem, diameter of the capitulum and days to maturity. These characters also recorded maximum direct effect on yield per plant indicating that yield was a function of both growth and yield components. The narrow differences between values at genotypic and phenotypic level suggested for low environmental effects.

17. S. ASHOK, N. MOHAMED SHERIFF AND S. LAKSHMI NARAYANAN [Combining ability studies in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 457-462 (2000). Department of Agricultural Botany, T. N. A. U. Agricultural college & Research Institute, Madurai-625 104, India

ABSTRACT

Combining ability studies through Line x Tester analysis in sunflower revealed the predominance of additive gene action governing the inheritance in all the characters except for 100-seed weight and oil content. Based on the per se performance and gca, the parents 338 A, 62 A, RHA 855, RHA 273 and RHA 299 were found to be good general combiners. Based on the per se performance, sca and standard heterosis, the crosses 338 A x RHA 296 and 338 A x RHA 855 were found to be the best specific combiners.

18. K. K. SARMA, S. K. DUTTA AND B. K. BORAH [Economic injury level of Aphis craccivora Koch. in kharif greengram var. AAU 34]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 463-468 (2000). Department of Entomology, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-13 (Assam), India

ABSTRACT

Economic injury level of Aphis craccivora Koch. in kharif greengram crop was estimated in Assam during 1994 and 1995. Graded levels of aphid infestation were created by application of phosphamidon 0.025%. The increase in exposure period to aphid attack brought about corresponding decrease in yield. Yield infestation relationship revealed that every unit increase in aphid attack resulted in a yield loss of 3.54-4.68 kg/ha. EIL on A. craccivora on greengram (var. AAU 34) was found to be 10-16 aphids/plant and such a population level may be attained even one week after their appearance.

19. L. O. ADEBAJO [Fungal infection and aflatoxin production in kola nuts]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 469-475 (2000). Department of Biological Sciences, Ogun State University, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria

ABSTRACT

A survey of the fungal infection on kola nuts, Cola acuminata and C. nitida obtained from 11 farms and 14 wholesale depots in Nigeria has been conducted. The proportion of diseased nuts varied from 2.6 to 12.9% and from 6.2 to 17.2% in the farm and depot samples, respectively. The fungi isolated were mainly Aspergillus niger from the black/deep brown discoloured nuts, A. flavus and A. tamarii from the yellow, Cunninghamella and Fusarium from the white and Penicillium from the green. Aspergillus species were the most infective and the inner surfaces of the cotyledons were infected more rapidly than the outer surfaces. All the fungi inoculated grew on and induced loss in weight of the milled nut, though to varying extents. A. niger brought about the greatest weight loss, followed by A. flavus and Penicillium funiculosum. Milled nuts of the two Cola species were found to be suitable for aflatoxin production by A. flavus. Appreciable quantities of aflatoxin B1 were produced as from the 10th day of incubation at 300C when 45 ppb was recorded. The levels increased progressively until the study was terminated on the 30th day when 600 and 790 ppb were estimated in the C. acuminata and C. nitida substrates, respectively. Throughout the investigation period, low levels of aflatoxin B2 were recorded, the maximum level was 55 ppb estimated in both the substrates on the 30th day.

20. B. F. OWOLADE, B. FAWOLE AND Y. O. K. OSIKANLU [Fungi associated with maize seed abnormalities in south-western Nigeria]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 476-481 (2000). Institute of Agricultural Research and Training, Ibadan, Nigeria

ABSTRACT

Three seed samples of maize showing different forms of discolouration and abnormalities were screened for associated fungi. Results showed that Fusarium moniliforme and Aspergillus flavus were isolated from all the categories of seed tested. The percentage incidence of F. moniliforme was significantly higher on seeds which showed white streaks, purple/pink discolouration, discoloured germ end and wrinkled seeds than any other fungus on all the three seed samples. Cephalosporium acremonium and Nigrospora aryzae were also associated with seeds that showed white streaks. Fusarium graminearum was associated wth purple/pink discolouration, while Drechslera maydis, Fusarium semitectum, Curvularia lunata and Colletotrichum graminicola were observed on seeds with brown spots. Botryodiplodia theobromae was more predominant on blackened seeds. Seeds with discoloured germ ends were mainly associated with C. acremonium, B. theobromae and D. maydis apart from F. moniliforme, while wrinkled seeds were observed to harbour F. moniliforme, D. maydis and C. graminicola.

21. P. OUDHIA AND R. S. TRIPATHI [Medicinal weed flora of brinjal (Solanum melongena L.) fields in Chhattisgarh (India) region]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 482-488 (2000). Department of Agronomy, Indira Gandhi Agricultural University, Raipur-492 001, India

ABSTRACT

Due to non-availability of any information regarding medicinal weed flora of brinjal fields in Chhattisgarh (India) region, a detailed survey was conducted. The survey was done in selected districts, namely, Raipur, Bilaspur, Durg, Bastar, Rajnandgaon and Sarguja. The survey was conducted in kharif and rabi seasons. The survey revealed that in kharif more than 40 weeds infested the brinjal fields and created problem for crops. Out of these 42 weeds, more than 37 weeds were identified as useful weeds. In rabi season, out of 21 problematic weeds, 18 weeds were identified as useful weeds. The survey revealed that there was a tremendous scope of utilizing the useful weeds in brinjal fields for providing additional income to farmers besides the recovery of the cost of handweeding.

22. S. SALVIN, K. BARUAH AND S. K. BORDOLOI [Drip irrigation studies in banana cv. Barjahaji (Musa AAA group, Cavendish sub-group)]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 489-493 (2000). Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785 013 (Assam), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at the Experimental Field, Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat to compare the growth, yield and water use of banana cv. Barjahaji under drip and basin method of irrigation with rainfed plants taken as control. There were six treatments in total. Four treatments were on drip irrigation at different levels of evaporation replenishment viz., 50, 75, 100 and 125% of USWB class A pan evaporation. The fifth treatment was basin irrigation at fortnightly intervals on the basis of available soil moisture depletion. The rainfed plants were used as control. The studies indicated that there was improved growth, early shooting, higher productivity and increased water use efficiency under drip irrigation as compared to basin irrigation. The yield and yield attributing characters were found to be significantly influenced by the different treatments and was found to be superior in plants under drip irrigation than those under basin irrigation. The highest bunch weight (14.26 kg) and highest yield (44.0 t/ha) were found under drip irrigation at 75% evaporation replenishment, while the lowest bunch weight (8.46 kg) and lowest yield (26.12 t/ha) were found in the rainfed plants. The water use efficiency (WUE) was considerably higher under drip irrigation than under basin irrigation. Drip irrigation at 75% evaporation replenishment recorded the highest WUE (300.01 kg/ha-cm), while it was lowest (146.09 kg/ha-cm) under basin irrigation.

23. A. S. THAKUR, S. M. VAISHAMPAYAN AND A. SHUKLA [Effect of varieties, nutrients and direction on the incidence of floral and vegetative malformation in grafted mango]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 494-499 (2000). Department of Entomology, J. N. Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Jabalpur, India

ABSTRACT

Out of the seven varieties, observed for the incidence of mango malformation, varies Hemsagar and Fazali proved to be the least susceptible, with 18.42 and 21.89% floral malformation and 4.67 and 5.0% vegetative malformation, respectively. In another set of experiment, different nutrients and insecticides were tested against mango malformation on var. Langra (grafted trees). Lowest incidence of malformation (20%) was observed in trees treated with rogor+multiplex+urea (2 ml+3 ml+40 g/l, respectively). Incidence of both vegetative and floral malformation was lowest in the south direction of the trees.

24. I. HANUMANTHARAJU, CHIKKALINGAIAH, S. SHRIDHARA AND E. GANGAPPA [Mutagenic effects on seed germination and seedling survival in mulberry (Morus indica L.)]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 500-503 (2000). Regional Research Station, V. C. Farm, Mandya-571 405 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

Open pollinated seeds of M-5 cultivar were treated with 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 KR of gamma rays and 0.15, 0.30, 0.45, 0.60, 0.75 and 0.90% of EMS to work out the LD50 doses for seed germination and seedling survival and their influence on the occurrence of chlorophyll deviants. The results revealed that the LD50 dose for seedling survival was about 28 KR of gamma rays. Occurrence of chlorophyll deviants was directly proportional to the increase in dosage. High doses of gamma rays especially 40 KR and above produced maximum chlorophyll mutants, whereas EMS produced mutants proportional to the concentration.

25. P. S. FATHIMA, P. K. DAS AND R. S. KATIYAR [Effect of different levels and sources of phosphorus on VA-mycorrhizal root colonization and spore load in mulberry (Morus alba L.)]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 504-508 (2000). Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute, Srirampura, Mysore-570 008, India

ABSTRACT

A study was conducted at Central Sericultural Research and Training Institute, Mysore during 1993-94 and 1994-95 to know the effect of different levels and sources of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal root colonization and spore load in mulberry. The study revealed a decreasing trend in mulberry root colonization by VA-mycorrhizal fungi and their sporulation in mulberry rhizosphere due to the application of higher doses of phosphorus. The mycorrhizal association was significantly enhanced at lower doses of phosphorus @ 30 kg/ha/year especially when less or sparingly soluble phosphatic fertilizers like diammonium phosphate and Mussorie rock phosphate are used.

26. G. K. SAIKIA, D. SARMA, A. DEKA AND S. C. BARUA [Foliar application of methanol on nursery tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] plants]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 509-512 (2000). Department of Tea Husbandry & Technology, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785 013, India

ABSTRACT

Young nursery tea plants were sprayed with 20 and 10% (v/v) of methanol alone and in combination with 1% (w/v) young tea dose (YTD) mixture. Application of methanol improved overall growth of the plants. Plant height, girth, leaf area, number of leaves, number of laterals and fresh and dry weight of shoots and roots were significantly increased in all methanol treated plants. The increase was more conspicuous when methanol (20%) was applied in combination with YTD (1%) mixture. An increase in the soluble sugar content of shoots and starch content of roots were also recorded.

27. V. S. KORIKANTHIMATH, V. KIRESUR, G. M. HIREMATH, RAJENDRA HEGDE, RAVINDRA MULGE AND M. M. HOSMANI [Economics of mixed cropping of Robusta coffee with cardamom]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 513-519 (2000). Indian Institute of Spices Research, Cardamom Research Centre, Appangala, Madikeri-571 201, Kodagu (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

The study carried out for nine years (1985-86 to 1993-94) on mixed cropping of Robusta coffee with cardamom v/s mono (sole) crop of Robusta coffee revealed that the cost of cultivation was highest Rs. 40234.67/ha in mixed cropping as against Rs. 26726.80/ha under monocropping. The net returns of Rs. 142689/ha realised in mixed cropping were 4.06 times more than monocropping. The incremental net gain in mixed cropping was Rs. 107584/ha (306.46%) over the monocrop. The financial feasibility measures such as NPW and BCR were also found to be higher by 2.57 and 1.74 times, respectively, in mixed cropping. The mixed cropping of cardamom with Robusta coffee generated income to the farmer over a period of nine months (July-March) and gainful employment both to onfarm labourers and hired agricultural workers in the high ranges of western ghats, round the year.

28. V. S. KORIKANTHIMATH, G. M. HIREMATH AND M. M. HOSMANI [Requirement of labour in the mixed cropping system of coconut and cardamom and its relationship with productivity levels]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 520-524 (2000). Indian Institute of Spices Research, Cardamom Research Centre, Appangala, Madikeri-571 201, Kodagu (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

Field experiment was conducted at Sirsi, Uttar Kannada district to study the yield potentiality and comparative labour requirement in the mixed cropping coconut with cardamom and monocropping of coconut. The study revealed that the mixed cropping system was able to generate gainful employment four times more than the monocropping system. The correlation analysis indicated the significant relation between yield levels and labour requirement of coconut in both the systems which signified the importance of human labour. Further, the spread of harvesting period of cardamom and coconut almost round the year helped the farmer to get continuous income.

29. S. B. DEVEVARANAVADGI, A. K. GUGGARI, S. B. KALAGHATAGI, S. Y. WALI AND M. B. PATIL [Performance of different tree species and their effect on physical and chemical properties of soil in northern dry zone of Karnataka]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 525-533 (2000). Regional Research Station, Bijapur-586 101 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted to study the performance of 24 tree species and their influence on physical and chemical properties of soil on shallow vertisols at Regional Research Station, Bijapur from 1990-1998. The results revealed that Eucalyptus citridora and Leucaena leucocephala recorded higher plant height and MAI in plant height followed by Eucalyptus hybrid and Acacia auriculiformis, while Azadirachta indica, Samanea saman, Albizia lebbeck, Eucalyptus citridora and Leucaena leucocephala were superior in producing higher diameter and MAI in DBH compared to other tree species. Soil physical properties viz., infiltration rate, pore space and available water holding capacity of soil improved with tree plantation. Similarly, soil chemical properties viz., organic carbon and available nutrients increased, while pH of the soil decreased with tree planting and which was lowest with Acacia nilotica and Acacia auriculiformis as compared with other tree species.

30. S. C. NEGI AND GULSHAN MAHAJAN [Effect of FYM, planting methods and fertilizer levels on rainfed wheat]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 534-536 (2000). Department of Agronomy, Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Field experiment was conducted at the experimental farm of Department of Agronomy and Agrometeorology, HPKV, Palampur during rabi season of 1994-95 with 16 treatment combinations with three replications in randomised block design. The treatments comprised two levels of FYM (No FYM and FYM @ 10 t/ha), two planting methods (line sowing and broadcast sowing) and four fertilizer levels (25 kg N/ha, N40P20K10, N80P40K20 and N120P60K40). Application of FYM @ 10 t/ha resulted in significant increase in grain and straw yield of wheat. Also, line sowing proved significantly superior over broadcast method of sowing. In case of fertilizer doses, the response was observed only upto N80P40K20 level of fertilizer denoting 80 kg N, 40 kg P2O5 and 20 kg K2O/ha.

31. S. K. THAKRAL, P. BHATNAGAR AND S. N. NANDAL [Performance of Asha variety of moong at farmers’ field under front line demonstration]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 537-538 (2000). CCSHAU Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Sadalpur-125 052 (Hisar), India

ABSTRACT

Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Sadalpur conducted the front line demonstrations (FLDs) on moong crop of variety Asha at farmers’ field of adopted villages during kharif 1996, 1997 and 1998. It was found that 34.8 to 41.6% increase in yield was observed in demonstration plots over local check. This increase was mainly due to improved agronomical practices which were followed while conducting the demonstration.

32. A. K. SINGH AND A. SINGH [Performance of tomato hybrids under sub-montane and low hills sub-tropical condition of H. P.]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 539-540 (2000). HPKV Regional Research Station, Dhaulakuan, Distt. Sirmour-173 001 (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out at HPKV Regional Research Station, Dhaulakuan during spring season of 1995 on tomato hybrids. Highest fruit yield alongwith resistance to fusarium wilt was recorded in hybrid Rupali (430.49 q/ha) followed by Rajani (339.88 q/ha) and Naveen (330.00 q/ha).

33. KEDAR PRASAD AND LAWLESH SINGH [Effect of fertility levels and incorporation of potato haulms on yield and profit of sunflower]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 541-543 (2000). Department of Agronomy, C. S. Azad University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur-208 002, India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out at C. S. Azad University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur during spring season of 1998. Six levels of nitrogen and fertility were tested with and without incorporation of potato haulms. Application of 80 kg N+60 kg P2O5+40 kg K2O/ha produced significantly higher seed yield by 4.17 q/ha (21.76%), number of filled seeds by 270 (30.6%), seed yield/head by 10.30 g (21.3%) than untreated plot. The highest net profit of Rs. 10334/ha was also obtained with the application of 80 kg N+60 kg P2O5+40 kg K2O/ha which was higher by Rs. 2777/ha (36.7%) over control. Incorporation of potato haulms increased seed yield by a tune of 1.17 q/ha (6.63%), seed weight/head by 1.61 g (3.10%) and net profit by Rs. 579/ha (6.63%) over without use of potato haulms.

34. AKHILESH SINGH AND A. K. SINGH [Effect of temperature and pH on growth of Streptomyces aureofaciens causing common scab of potato]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 544-545 (2000). HPKV Regional Research Station, Dhaulakuan, Sirmour-173 001 (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The common scab caused by Streptomyces aureofaciens is a serious disease of potato. In the present study, effect of temperature and pH was observed on growth of the bacterium. The pathogen, S. aureofaciens isolated from scabby potato showed its best growth at temperature of 280C and 7.0 pH.

35. S. V. GHOLAP, V. N. DOD, S. A. BHUYAR AND S. G. BHARAD [Effect of plant growth regulators on seed germination and seedling growth in aonla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) under climatic condition of Akola]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 546-548 (2000). Commercial Fruit Nursery Unit, Central Research Station, Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola-444 104, India

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of growth regulators on the germination and seedling growth of aonla (Phyllanthus emblica L.). Amongst the three growth regulators, GA3 200 ppm was observed significantly superior over all other treatments with respect to early initial germination, germination per cent, height and stem girth of seedling and number of roots per seedling under climatic conditions of Akola. Significant effect on various characters was also observed with thiourea 200 ppm.

36. D.P. PANDEY, V.K. RATHEE AND G.S..SETHI [Scrrening of barley germplasm for multiple disease resistance].Crop Res. 20 (3): 549-550 (2000). HPKV Regional Research Station, Bajaura (Kullu)-175 125 (H.P.), India.

ABSTRACT

A total of 398 barley genotypes were screened against five major diseases (yellow rust ,brown rust, barley blight, loose and covered smuts) of barley. out of these, 167 genotypes were found free from all diseases.

37. R.K. KHULBE, D.P. PANT AND NAVEEN SAXENA [Variability,heritability and genetic advance in Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L) Czern &Coss].Crop Res. 20 (3) :551-552 (2000). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263 145, India

ABSTRACT

Estimates of variability, heritability and genetic advance for yield and its components obtained using a 8 x 8 diallel in Indian mustard revealed maximum variability for seed yield. All the characters except oil content exhibited high heritability with high or moderate genetic advance, suggesting the role of additive gene action in conditioning the traits. Non-additive gene action appeared to influence the expression of days to maturity, while environment had a major influence on oil content. The use of pedigree selection or biparental mating in advanced generations was advocated to achieve substantial gains.

38. M. SELVARANI AND P. GOMATHINAYAGAM [Genetic variability in foxtailmillet [Setaria italica (L.) Beau]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 553-554 (2000). Department of Millets, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003, India

ABSTRACT

Variability, heritability and genetic advance were studied in 50 genotypes of foxtailmillet [Setaria italica (L.) Beau]. Higher level of GCV and PCV were observed for number of productive tillers and grain yield per plant. The highest account of heritability was observed for plant height followed by grain yield per plant, days to maturity, number of productive tillers and days to 50% flowering. the genetic advance as per cent of mean was high for number of productive tillers followed by grain yield per plant and plant height.

39. MANOJ K. SRIVASTAV AND R. P. SINGH [Genetic divergence analysis in Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 555-557 (2000). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, CSA University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Genetic divergence using D2 statistics of 26 Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) cultivars was grouped into six different clusters. The cluster I was the biggest with 18 cultivars followed by clusters III and II with three and two cultivars, respectively. Clusters IV, V and VI were unique since they had only one cultivar. The diversity among the cultivars measured by inter- cluster distance (D-values) was adequate for improvement of Indian mustard by hybridization and selection. The cultivars included in the diverse clusters can be used as promising parents for hybridization programme for obtaining high heterotic response and thus better segregants in Indian mustard.

40. P. OUDHIA [Evaluation of some botanicals against orange banded blister beetle (Zonabris pustulata Thunb.)]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 558-559 (2000). Department of Agronomy, Indira Gandhi Agricultural University, Raipur-492 001, India

ABSTRACT

Due to non-availability of any information regarding use of botanicals for the management of orange banded blister beetle, a study was conducted. Toxic effects of total 20 plant species on zonabris were studied. Aqueous leaf extracts (1 : 10 w/v) of these plant species were used for the study. Different extracts produced significant effects. Maximum mortality (45.0%) was noted in case of Euphorbia leaf extract, whereas Calotropis, Datura, Sida, Tephrosia, Achyranthes, Calliandra and Guajava leaf extracts failed to produce any detrimental effect on Zonabris.

41. P. OUDHIA [Positive (inhibitory) allelopathic effects of Parthenium leaves on germination and seedling vigour of sunflower]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 560-562 (2000). Department of Agronomy, Indira Gandhi Agricultural University, Raipur-492 001, India

ABSTRACT

Allelopathic effects of different quantities of Parthenium hysterophorus L. leaves on germination and seedling vigour of sunflower were studied. The experiment was conducted in earthen pots containing 2.5 kg sandy soil. Different quantities of Parthenium leaves were decomposed in earthen pots and sunflower seeds were sown. Different quantities of Parthenium leaves produced positive (inhibitory) allelopathic effects on germination and seedling vigour of sunflower.

42. P. OUDHIA [Allelopathic effects of Parthenium hysterophorus and Ageratum conyzoides on wheat var. Sujata]. Crop Res. 20 (3) : 563-566 (2000). Department of Agronomy, Indira Gandhi Agricultural University, Raipur-492 001, India.

ABSTRACT

Allelopathic effects of common weeds Parthenium hysterophorus and Ageratum conyzoides on germination and seedling vigour of wheat var. Sujata were investigated. Root, stem, leaf and stem+leaf of Parthenium and Ageratum were cut into fine pieces, immersed in water and decayed for 24 h in the ratio of 1 : 10 (w/v). Extracts were applied on wheat seeds. Different extracts produced significant allelopathic effects on germination and seedling vigour of wheat. In case of germination at 9 days after sowing (DAS), maximum percentage inhibition over control (-25.8) was noted under Ageratum stem+leaf extract. Ageratum stem extract and Parthenium leaf extract produced stimulatory effects on shoot and root elongation, respectively.