Volume 6, Number 2 (August 2005)

By | July 26, 2014

Titles of research papers/articles alongwith their abstracts.
For full text, please contact to Editor-in-chief at :
info@cropresearch.org


1. R. K. MAITI*, P. VIDYASAGAR**, SAMBHULING C. SHAHAPUR AND V. P. SINGH1 [Research trends on food value and chemical composition of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. ) seeds–A review]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 179-189 (2005). Vibha Agrotech Ltd. 501, Sirisampada, Rajbhavan Road, Samajiguda, Hyderabad-500 082( A. P.), India *(E-mail : rkmaiti@yahoo.com; **pvsagar@sify.com).


ABSTRACT

Sunflower being an important edible oil of high commercial value in India and other countries, sufficient research activities have been directed on food value, seed quality and chemical composition of sunflower seeds. Besides its human consumption, sunflower seeds are utilised as feed grains of different animals, lactating cows, heifers, rabbits, lambs, chickens, etc. with desirable results. It is used in an attempt to reduce cardiovascular diseases. Some sunflower seeds are rich with oleic acid. Besides, the levels of anti-oxidant (tocopherols) and phytosterols are naturally high in the traditional sunflower oils. Sufficient researches are directed also on the extraction methods, purification and chemical composition of sunflower seeds. Among these may be mentioned the estimation of phenolic compounds such as caffeic and chlorogenic acids and their derivatives, different lipid and fatty acids, triacylglycerol, stearic acid, cDNA cloning and also antimicrobial and fungal activities.

2. N. B. ZENDE, H. N. SETHI, A. P. KARUNAKAR AND D. J. JIOTODE [Effect of sowing time and fertility levels on growth and yield of durum wheat genotypes]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 190-191 (2005). Department of Agronomy Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.), India.


ABSTRACT

An experiment was carried out in rabi season of 2002-03 at the Farm of Wheat Research Unit, Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.). The treatments consisted of two varieties (AKDW-4146 and MACS-2846), three sowing dates (15 November, 1 December and 15 December) and three fertility levels (90 : 45 : 45, 120 : 60 : 60 and 150 : 75 : 75). The experiment was laid out in a split plot design with three replications. The growth, yield attributes except length of spike and yield showed significant increase when durum wheat crop was sown on 15 November over 1 December and 15 December. The growth, yield attributes except number of grains per spike and yield showed significant increase when durum wheat crop was given 150 : 75 : 75 fertilizer dose.

3. N. B. ZENDE, H. N. SETHI, A. P. KARUNAKAR AND D. J. JIOTODE [Effect of sowing time and fertility levels on yield and quality of durum wheat genotypes]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 192-193 (2005). Department of Agronomy Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

An experiment was carried out in rabi season of 2002-03 at the Farm of Wheat Research Unit, Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.). The treatments consisted of two varieties (AKDW-4146 and MACS-2846), three sowing dates (15 November, 1 December and 15 December) and three fertility levels (90 : 45 : 45, 120 : 60 : 60 and 150 : 75 : 75). The experiment was laid out in a split plot design with three replications. The yield and protein content were signficantly higher with MACS-2846 over AKDW-4146 variety. The yield decreased with delay in sowing and protein content was increased with delay in sowing. The yield and protein content in grain were increased with increase in fertilizer levels.

4. SATISH KUMAR, V. S. KADIAN, SHASHI MADAN AND S. K. SHARMA [Effect of organic and inorganic nutrition on wheat genotypes]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 194-196 (2005). Department of Agronomy CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted on sandy loam soils during winter seasons of 2002-03 and 2003-04 at research farm of CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar to study the relative performance of wheat genotypes in organic and inorganic nutrition. Inorganic nutrition increased the grain yield significantly during both the years of study as compared to organic nutrition. Among genotypes, DI 717 produced the highest grain yield. Wheat grain quality parameters viz, protein content, sedimentation value and grain appearance score were found superior in inorganic nutrition.

5. N. B. ZENDE, H. N. SETHI, A. P. KARUNAKAR AND D. J. JIOTODE [Effect of sowing time and fertility levels on yield and economics of durum wheat genotypes]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 197-198 (2005). Department of Agronomy Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.), India. 

ABSTRACT

An experiment was carried out in rabi season of 2002-03 at the Farm of Wheat Research Unit, Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.). The treatments consisted of two varieties (AKDW-4146 and MACS-2846), three sowing dates (15 November, 1 December and 15 December) and three fertility levels (90 : 45 : 45, 120 : 60 : 60 and 150 : 75 : 75). The experiment was laid out in a split plot design with three replications. The yield and net monetary returns were significantly higher with MACS-2846 over AKDW-4146 variety. The yield was significantly higher with 15 November sowing and it was found to be the most economical sowing time. The yield and net monetary returns were significantly superior with 150 : 75 : 75 fertilizer level.

6. ANUREET KAUR AND V. P. SINGH [Moisture extraction pattern, consumptive use of water and water use efficiency of hybrid pearl millet as influenced by planting methods, mulching and weed control under rainfed conditions]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 199-201 (2005). Department of Agronomy CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.


ABSTRACT

Field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2001 to study the effect of planting methods, mulching and weed control on water use efficiency in rainfed hybrid pearl millet. The increased consumptive use of water was observed in paired row planting compared to normal sowing. Use of organic mulch treatments viz., 40 q/ha and 20 q/ha air-dried bajra seedlings and weed control treatments i. e. hand weeding (15 DAS) and atrazine @ 0.5 kg a. i./ha reduced the consumptive use of water over control treatments. Water use efficiency decreased under paired row treatment compated to regular planting. Twenty q/ha treatment of mulch increased the WUE. However, further increase in amount of organic mulch (40 q/ha) slightly decreased the WUE. The WUE increased under both the weed control treatments compared to weedy check. Water utilization from upper most soil layer (0-30 cm) and lower soil layer (90-120 cm) was slightly higher under paired row planting. In contrary, the soil depths (30-60 and 60-90 cm) there was slight decrease in water utilization under paired row than regular planting. The moisture extraction by crop from 30-60 and 60-90 cm soil depths increased slightly under the influence of organic mulch. Whereas it decreased under hand weeding and atrazine application treatments of weed control compared to weedy check at all the soil depths.

7. PERMENDRA SINGH, S. PRASAD AND P. TRIPATHI [Productivity of rice as influenced by genotypes and different crop growing environments]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 202-204 (2005). Department of Agronomy Narendra Deva University of Agriculture & Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad-224 229 (U. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out during kharif season of 1998-99 at Instructional Farm of Narendra Deva University of Agriculture & Technology, Kumarganj, Faizabad to evaluate the productivity of rice in response to different genotypes and crop growing environments. The genotypes and various crop growing environments differed significantly in respect to productivity of rice. The genotypes NDR 359 recorded significantly higher leaf area index, dry matter accumulation, fertile tillers, grains per panicle and grain and straw yields of crop over rest of the genotypes. Planting of rice under 20 x 10 cm row spacing produced significantly higher grain yield over 25 x 10 cm row spacing and statistically at par with 15 x 10 cm crop growing environments.


8. H. N. TRIPATHI, SUBASH CHAND AND A. K. TRIPATHI [Growth and yield of bengal gram (Cicer arietinum) as influenced by mustard raised as intercrop and varying levels of phosphorus]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 205-208 2005). Department of Agronomy C. S. Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India.


ABSTRACT

A study was undertaken at Kanpur by introducing mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss.] as intercrop with two row proportions in bengal gram (Cicer arietinum L.) fertilized with 0, 30, 60 and 90 kg P2O5/ha during winter seasons of 1998-99 and 1999-2000, to study the growth and yield behaviour of bengal gram in association with mustard. Inclusion of mustard as intercrop reduced the growth parameters of bengal gram in intercropping systems. The yield attributes viz., pods/plant, pod weight/plant, seeds/pod and seed weight/plant of all types of branches were also decreased by intercropping of mustard. Further among the intercropping systems, bengal gram+mustard grown in 8 : 2 row ratio resulted in significantly higher growth and yield attributes over 6 : 2 row planting system. Respective means of bengal gram seed yield were 404, 309 and 370 g per row when gram was grown as pure and intercropped with mustard in 6 : 2 and 8 : 2 row planting pattern, respectively. Bengal gram responded to P application upto 60 kg/ha.


9. MULI DEVI PARIHAR, HARBIR SINGH, R. S. HOODA, V. P. SINGH AND K. P. SINGH [Grain yield, water use and water-use efficiency of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) hybrids under varying nitrogen applications]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 209-210 (2005). Department of Agronomy CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during the rainy (kharif) season of 2004 on a sandy loam soil at Research Farm, Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar to study the effect of varying nitrogen levels on grain yield, water use and water-use efficiency of some pearl millet hybrids under limited water supply. Pearl millet hybrid HHB 67-2/HHB 67 improved gave significantly higher grain yield (3683 kg/ha) and higher seasonal water use (248.2 mm) than rest of the hybrids. Hybrid HHB 68 being at par with HHB 67-2/HHB 67 improved recorded markedly higher water-use efficiency. Application of 100 kg N/ha, being at par with 80 kg N/ha, resulted in higher grain yield and water use than rest of the nitrogen levels.


10. R. GALLANI, J. M. DIGHE, R. A. SHARMA* AND P. K. SHARMA [Relative performance of different chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes grown on vertisols]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 211-213 (2005). J. N. K. V. V. College of Agriculture, Indore-452 001 (M. P.), India *(E-mail : sharmara2001@yahoo.com).


ABSTRACT

Twenty chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes were grown on rainfed black clay soils (vertisols) for evaluating their relative performance with respect to nodulation, yield attributes and yield. The genotypes were of different maturity periods viz., extra early, early, medium and medium late maturity groups. The study on relative performance of genotypes revealed a significant variation with respect to nodulation, yield and yield attributes. Results indicated that chickpea genotype IG 378-9 showed its superiority over other genotypes in almost all the parameters.


11. S. S. TOMAR AND R. J. TIWARI [Response of mustard varieties to fertility levels under normal sown condition]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 214-216 (2005). J. N. K. V. V. Zonal Agricultural Research Station, Morena-476 001 (Madhya Pradesh), India.

ABSTRACT

Field experiment was conducted on mustard varieties (CS-614-4-1-4, SAL-7, Kranti, SAL-9 and CS-52) and four fertility levels of N : P : K (60 : 30 : 15, 80 : 40 : 20, 100 : 50 : 25 and 120 : 60 : 30 kg ha-1) on Vertic Ustochrepts during rabi season of 2003-04. Results revealed that variety SAL-9 was the yielder and nutrient uptaker significantly over CS-614-4-1-4 and CS-52. Highest available nutrient status and balance sheet of nutrient were also recorded in SAL-9. Application of N : P : K resulted significantly in increase in yield, nutrient uptake, available nutrient status and balance sheet of nutrients, but the significant response was observed upto 100 : 50 : 25 kg ha-1 N : P : K, respectively..


12. S. SRIDHARA [SFGROWS : A simulation model to predict growth and yield of sunflower. I. Model development]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 217-220 (2005). Agricultural Research Station, Babbur Farm Post, Hiriyur-572 143, India.

ABSTRACT

Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is one of the important oil seed crops grown quite often in dry lands. Crop simulation models assist to assess the production risks associated with variable climate in dry lands. This paper describes the development of a SunFlower GROWth Simulator (SFGROWS) : a simulation model of sunflower to predict the growth and yield of sunflower. The model uses a few conservative relationships to define leaf area development as a function of leaf number and in turn leaf number as a function of accumulated thermal units. Biomass accumulation was simulated as a function of fraction of photosynthetically active radiation interception and radiation use efficiency. Seed growth is simulated from a linear increase in harvest index with time. The model performed satisfactorily in predicting the aerial biomass, leaf area and final yield of sunflower.

13. S. SRIDHARA [SFGROWS : A simulation model to predict growth and yield of sunflower. II. Simulating the effects of irrigation and moisture stress]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 221-224 (2005). Agricultural Research Station, Babbur Farm Post, Hiriyur-572 143, India.

ABSTRACT

A sunflower simulation model SFGROWS developed int he earlier paper of this series is calibrated to predict the growth and yield of sunflower as influenced by irrigation and moisture stress experienced by the crop at different crop growth stages. Crop sensitivity factors were developed to account the effects of deficit irrigation or moisture stress. The model was tested for its ability to predict the growth and yield of sunflower exposed to various degrees of moisture stress. The results indicated that the model predictions were almost in line with the observed values indicating the ability of the model to predict the growth and yield of sunflower very well.

14. G. N. SHIRPURKAR, N. V. KASHID, M. S. KAMBLE AND V. N. GAVHANE [Effect of application of different micronutrients on growth attributing characters of soybean (Glycine max. (L.) Merrill)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 225-228 (2005). Agricultural Research Station, Niphad, District Nashik-422 303 (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

Due to high protein content (40-42%) of soybean, it is known as “poor man’s meat”. The productivity of soybean is very low in India i. e. upto 1000 kg/ha. The use of micronutrients in soybean is one of the ways to boost up the productivity. The growth attributing characters are directly related to the productivity. On the other hand, FYM is the organic source of different macro and micronutrients. Hence, in the present investigation, it was evaluated that whether we could boost up the soybean production with only micronutrients or FYM or with combination of both. From present investigation, it was concluded that application of recommended dose of NPK (30 : 60 : 0 kg/ha)+zinc @ 10 kg/ha+FYM 10 t/ha significantly contributed to the growth attributing characters, hence ultimately increased the productivity of soybean.


15. N. D. PARLAWAR, D. G. GIRI, R. M. ADPAWAR AND S. U. KAKDE [Effect of seed rate, row spacing and phosphorus on seed production of dhaincha (Sesbania aculeata)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 229-233 (2005). Department of Agronomy Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.), India.


ABSTRACT

Two independent sets of field experiment were conducted for two consecutive kharif seasons during 1999-2000 and 2000-01 at Department of Agronomy Farm, Dr. P. D. K. V., Akola to determine the optimum seed rate, plant density and influence of phosphorus fertilisation on seed production of dhaincha (Sesbania aculeata) green manure crop. From this study, it was concluded that growing of S. aculeata during kharif season with a spacing of 60 cm row to row, 25 kg seed rate ha-1 and phosphorus level of 50 kg ha-1 can be considered as optimum management techniques for increased quality seed yield.


16. G. MURUGAN AND R. M. KATHIRESAN [Income and economic efficiency under low land integrated farming systems]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 234-236 (2005). Department of Agronomy Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

Low land integrated farming system research studies comprising enterprises like rice, fish, poultry and rabbit were undertaken at Annamalai University Experimental Farm, Annamalainagar to evolve a suitable integrated farming system for rice-based wetland cropping tracts and to study the impact of integrated farming systems on the income and economics. Among the above mentioned enterprises, rice integrated with fish and poultry produced the highest per day returns of Rs.2137 and 3544 and net returns to the tune of Rs.1,55,920 and 2,28,090 in the Samba and Navarai crops, respectively, when compared to the rice and rabbit in the first and rice alone in the second cropping season.


17. B. P. SINGH, M. C. MUNDRA AND S. C. GUPTA [Productivity, stability, economics and nutrient balance of various cropping systems in semi-arid tropics] Res. on crops 6 (2) : 237-241 (2005). Department of Agronomy CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar for three consecutive years (2000-01 to 2002-03) in balanced incomplete block design with four replications with a view to find out efficient cropping system for irrigated conditions of south-west Haryana. Among the cropping systems evaluated, pearlmillet-potato-greengram was identified as the most efficient system, showing the highest total equivalent yield (14344 kg ha-1), gross return (Rs. 93910 ha-1), net return (Rs. 47965 ha-1), energy equivalent (50585 K calories x 1000 ha-1) and system productivity (55.17). The highest land use efficiency (93.15) and risk factor (Rs. 7898 ha-1) were found in soybean-wheat-cowpea (F) cropping system. In sorghum (F)-wheat, maximum B : C ratio (2.48) and system index (0.85) were recorded. Positive nutrient balance of 607.7 kg ha-1 was only recorded in pearlmillet-potato-greengram cropping system, and it was negative in all other systems though it was minimum in cotton-wheat and pearlmillet-wheat. There had been no change in pH, EC and OC content in soil , though available N content inserted in soybean-wheat-cowpea (F) and pearlmillet-fieldpea-maize (F), phosphorus depleted in pearlmillet-fieldpea-maize (F) and pearlmillet-potato-greengram. The potassium depleted was relatively higher in pearlmilet-wheat, soybean-wheat-cowpea (F) and cotton-wheat cropping systems as compared to initial soil fertility status.


18.DAYA RAM, B. S. PANWAR, R. L. AHUJA, M. S. KUHAD, JAGAN NATH AND S. S. DAHIYA [Soil-physiographic relationship of Sirsa district (Haryana) using remote sensing technique]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 242-245 (2005). Department of Soil Science CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

A reconnaissance soil survey of Sirsa district (Haryana) covering total area of 4276 sq. km was carried out using satellite imageries of 1 : 50000 scale to study the soil-physiographic relationship. A detailed physiographic legend was prepared and boundaries were confirmed in relation to soil. Three major physiographic units were identified in the area viz., (1) Aeolian plain, (2) Aeo-fluvial plain and (3) Ghaggar flood plain. Each of the major units was sub-divided on the basis of photo elements, tone, texture, erosion, parcelling, etc. The soil of (i) sand dunes were classified as Typic Torripsamments, (ii) very gently undulating plain of sand dunal areas as Typic Torripsamments in association with coarse loamy, Aridic Haplustepts, (iii) nearly level plain as coarse loamy/fine loamy, Aridic Haplustepts, (iv) level plain as fine loamy, Aridic Haplustepts, (v) low lying plain as fine silty, Typic Haplustepts, (vi) paleochannels and lakes as coarse loamy, Typic Fluvaquents and (vii) levees, active and recent flood plains as fine loamy/coarse loamy, Typic Ustifluvents.


19. B. C. THAKUR AND R. S. SPEHIA [Effect of drip lateral spacing and crop geometry on yield and quality of tomato under drip irrigation]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 246-249 (2005). Department of Soil Science & Water Management Dr. Y. S. Parmar University of Horticulture & Forestry, Nauni, Solan-173 230 (H. P), India.


ABSTRACT

Tomato is the main cash crop of farmers of Solan district and adjoining areas, which produces tomato during off-season and feeds whole India during June-August. But the crop is largely rainfed and production suffers heavily due to erratic weather conditions especially due to lack of rain. So, to increase and maintain good tomato production, drip irrigation is seen as good alternative and source of water supply to the plant during harsh months of April-June by applying crop geometry so as to reduce the cost of installation of drip irrigation system, which runs very high in the vegetables. This experiment was conducted during May 1998-August 2000 (three seasons) by applying eight treatments keeping drip lateral distance at 1.80, 2.20, 2.60 and 3.00 m and varying plant to plant and row to row spacing. Highest yield (417.92 q/ha) of tomato fruit was obtained under the treatment with drip lateral spacing of 2.60 m with four rows of planting along each lateral and paired row planting with interpair spacing of 40 cm and plant spacing of 20 x 41 cm within rows. Highest number of fruits per plant (31.00), diameter of fruit (48.83 mm), weight of fruit (69.27 g) and best cost economics (5.13) were observed under the same treatment.

20. MANGE RAM SUTHAR, G. P. SINGH, M. K. RANA, NARENDRA SINGH AND OM PARKASH KAMBOJ [Effect of planting dates and fertility levels on yield and quality of brinjal seed]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 250-252 (2005). Department of Vegetable Crops CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

A field trial was conducted at Research Farm of Vegetable Science Department, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar to find out the effect of planting dates and fertility levels on seed yield and seed quality attributes of brinjal cv. BR-112 during kharif season of 1999-2000. The seed yield, seed recovery percentage, test weight, seed vigour index-I and standard germination percentage were recorded statistically higher when the crop was transplanted on 10 June and supplied with nitrogen 125 kg, phosphorus 62.5 kg, potassium 62.5 kg and zinc sulfate 25 kg/ha.


21. A. SASI, D. DHANAVEL AND P. PAVADAI [Effect of chemical mutagenesis on bhendi [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench] var. MDU-1]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 253-255 (2005). Division of Genetics & Plant Breeding Department of Botany Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

The experiments were carried out to evaluate the cumulative effects of ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS) and diethylsulphate (DES) seed treatment on growth, morphological and seed yield of bhendi [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench] var. MDU-1 grown under five different concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0% both EMS and DES). EMS were found to be more effective than DES in producing increased vigour in various morphological, growth parameters and seed yield of bhendi. The breeding behaviour and economic macromutants were also studied in M2 generation. All the plant type mutants registered lower yield, when compared to their parents. Among the plant mutants studied, maximum plant height has been identified at 0.8% EMS (86.7 cm). Another type of mutant identified at 0.4% EMS had more number of fruits and maximum fruit weight (8.17 and 14.17 g). The maximum number of leaves was observed at 1.0% EMS and 0.8% DES (25.6 and 25.2). Maximum fruit length and fruit breadth were observed in 0.8% EMS (16.16 and 1.72 cm) and maximum yield was observed at 0.6% DES (174.60 g). The results revealed that the EMS seed treatment was more beneficial in the increased vigour in various morphological, growth parameters and seed yield of bhendi.


22. A. K. SAHA, P. S. NATH AND B. K. DE [Field reaction of some chilli hybrid cultivars/lines against leaf curl virus in West Bengal]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 256-258 (2005). Department of Plant Pathology Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, P. O. Mohanpur-741 252, Nadia (West Bengal), India.


ABSTRACT

Chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) is one of the important cash crops in India. The production of this crop is getting serious setback due to leaf curl virus disease. The best way is to control the disease by growing resistant varieties against leaf curl virus. Field reaction of nine hybrid varieties/lines of chilli for resistance against chilli leaf curl virus disease clearly showed that none of the varieties was free from the disease. The disease incidence varied from 16.25 to 53.75%. The lowest disease incidence was recorded by the variety/line ARCH 226 (16.25 to 19.21%) and highest by the hybird variety/line HOE 818 (50.33 to 53.75%). Of the nine hybrid varieties/lines tested, two hybrid varieties/lines (ARCH 226 and ARCH-006) were found moderately resistant, two hybrid varieties/lines (INDAM-6 and ARCH-228) were moderately susceptible, one hybrid variety (PICADOR) was highly susceptible and rest four (ARCH-112, F1-86235, HOE-818 and HOE-888) were susceptible to the disease. These hybrid varieties/lines differed significantly with respect to coefficient of infection (C. I.) and these variations followed the similar trend to that of disease incidence. The C. I. ranged from 4.06 to 40.31. The hybrid variety/line ARCH 226 showed the least C. I. (4.06-4.80) and highest C. I. was observed on HOE 818 (37.75-40.31%). The hybrid variety/line ARCH 226 produced highest yield (175.60 to 176.67 q/ha) and lowest yield (91.88 to 92.56 q/ha) was recorded by the hybrid variety/line HOE 818.

23. A. K. SAHA, P. S. NATH AND B. K. DE [Assessment of yield loss in chilli due to chilli leaf curl virus (CLCV) disease]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 259-260 (2005). Department of Plant Pathology Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, P. O. Mohanpur-741 252, Nadia (West Bengal), India.


ABSTRACT

Study on yield losses due to chilli leaf curl virus (CLCV) disease on variety Suryamukhi at different stages during summer season 2001 and winter season 2001-02, showed that infection caused reduction in number and weight of chilli fruits per plant. During summer season, the loss of yield in comparison to healthy plants was found to be 81.30, 63.10 and 22.70% from plants infected at 30, 45 and 60 days after transplanting, respectively. Whereas in case of winter season, the loss of yield was found to be 74.60, 51.20 and 21.30% from the plants infected at 30, 45 and 60 days after transplanting, respectively. It was found that percentage of yield loss was more during summer months than winter and early stages of infection caused much reduction in yield in comparison to control plot where all the plants were free from CLCV infection irrespective of season.


24. G. S. HARI, P. V. RAO AND Y. N. REDDY [Evaluation of different germplasm on growth and yield in irrigated paprika (Capsicum annuum L.)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 261-265 (2005). A. N. G. R. A. U. Jannareddy Venkat Reddy Horticultural Research Station, Malyal (A. P.), India.


ABSTRACT

Germplasm evaluation study with 18 genotypes showed greater variability for growth and yield traits. The genotypes MCA 24, LCA 414 and MCA 32 were found to be better for growth attributes, KTPI-19 attained maturity very early. The lines MCA 32 in number of fruits per plant, MCA 30 in fruit length, MCA 29 in fruit diameter, MCA 24 in fruit weight and yield per plant and LCA 406 in number of seeds per fruit recorded the highest values among the yield attributes.


25. G. S. HARI, P. V. RAO AND Y. N. REDDY [Evaluation of paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) germplasm and its utility in breeding for higher yield and better quality grown under irrigated conditions]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 266-269 (2005). A .N. G. R. A. U. Jannareddy Venkat Reddy Horticultural Research Station, Malyal-506 101 (A. P.), India..


ABSTRACT

Eighteen genotypes of paprika germplasm maintained at Jannareddy Venkat Reddy Horticultural Research Station, Malyal, Warangal district, A. P. were evaluated for fruit yield and quality attributes, namely, oleoresin content, capsanthin content, capsaicin content and ascorbic acid content (AAC). The genotype MCA 24 recorded significantly higher values in respect of dry fruit yield (100.62 g) per plant and capsanthin content (112.85 ASTA units) than the other genotypes. The highest oleoresin content and AAC in dry fruit was recorded with MCA 32 (20.26%) and MCA 27 (99.08 mg 100-1 g), respectively. The genotypes MCA 32 (0.28%) and MCA 24 (0.29%) recorded the lower capsaicin content and they are recommended in the breeding programmes for the improvement of fruit yield and quality.


26.A. MOHAMADALI, M. D. MADALAGERI AND RAVINDRA MULGE [Evaluation of winged bean [Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.] accessions for growth and yield characters]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 270-273 (2005). Department of Olericulture Kittur Rani Chennamma College of Horticulture, Arabhavi-591 310 (Karnataka), India.


ABSTRACT

An investigation on evaluation of winged bean [Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.] accessions for growth and yield characters in 36 accessions was carried out at the Department of Olericulture, KRCCH, Arabhavi (Karnataka). The accession WAS-26-6 had longest vine of 3.05 m. The PTK-7 had highest number of leaves (345.50) per plant, while WAS-13-1 had highest leaf area (1.25 m2) per plant. The accession PTK-8 had highest number of nodules per plant, while WAS-51 had highest nodule weight per plant. While WAS-22-2 had highest leaf dry weight (86.73 g), the genotype WAS-26-6 had higher pod, tuber and total plant dry weight. The vegetable green pod yield was highest (1.90 kg/plant) followed by WAS-26-6 and PTK-9.


27. A. MOHAMADALI, M. B. MADALAGERI AND B. R. PATIL [Evaluation of winged bean [Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.] genotypes for tuber yield and yield attributing traits]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 274-276 (2005). Department of Olericulture Kittur Rani Chennamma College of Horticulture, Arabhavi-591 310 (Karnataka), India.


ABSTRACT

An investigation on evaluation of 36 genotypes of winged bean [Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.] accessions for tuber yield and yield attributing traits was carried out at Department of Olericulture, Kittur Rani Chennamma College of Horticulture, Arbhavi during kharif 2000. The genotype WAS-23-2 was found superior over all other genotypes with respect to tuber yield per plant of 457.50 g followed by Sirsi Local (375.50 g) and WAS-40 (364.75 g). However, Sirsi Local had longest roots (23.25 cm).

28. D. K. SINGH, P. K. PAUL AND S. K. GHOSH [Response of papaya to foliar application of boron, zinc and their combinations]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 277-280 (2005). Department of Pomology and Post Harvest Technology Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Pundibari-736 165, Cooch Behar (West Bengal), India.


ABSTRACT

An experiment was carried out at the Horticultural Research Farm of Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya to study the effect of micronutrients viz., boron (borax 0.25% and borax 0.5%) and zinc (zinc sulphate 0.25% and zinc sulphate 0.5%) applied singly and in different combinations at two months from transplanting on the growth, flowering, yield and quality of papaya cv. Ranchi. Both the micronutrients significantly increased the growth of the plant, number of leaves produced per plant and length of petiole (5th leaf). Application of micronutrients hastened flowering by 10-20 days. Both the micronutrients increased the individual fruit weight, fruit size and pulp thickness of fruit and reduced the seed content of fruit. Combined application of borax 0.5 per cent+zinc sulphate 0.25% produced the highest yield (93.00 t/ha) compared with 61.56 t/ha in control. The same treatment showed best response in increasing the TSS (6.81°B), total sugar (6.88%), reducing sugar (6.35%), non-reducing sugar (0.53%), ascorbic acid (57.11 mg/100 g pulp), b-carotene (3324.14 µg/100 g pulp) and TSS : acid ratio (58.41) content of fruit.

29. M. VAITHIYALINGAN AND N. NADARAJAN [Combining ability studies in inter racial crosses of rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 281-286 (2005). Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics Agricultural College and Research Institute, Madurai-625 104, India.


ABSTRACT

Seven lines (two indicas and five tropical japonicas) and six testers (three indicas and three japonicas) and their 42 hybrids were studied for combining ability on nine quantitative traits. Studies on gene action revealed that the traits viz., days to 50% flowering, pollen fertility per cent and plant height were governed by additive gene action, whereas the other six traits viz., productive tillers per plant, panicle length, number of grains per panicle, spikelet fertility (%), tester weight and grain yield were governed by non-additive gene action. Five parents viz., ASD 16, ASD 18, ADT 43, IR 65600-32-4-6-1 and Odaebayeo were adjudged as best, as they possessed high per se and significant gca effects for most of the characters studied. Hence, multiple crosses involving these above five parents would yield good segregants with most of the economic traits. The combinations with high per se and sca effects for grain yield alongwith important yield components were Dular x 16920, Dular x Odaebayeo, ASD 16 x IET 16114, Dular x IET 16114 (indica/japonica); IR 65601-120-3-5 x ADT 43, IR 67323-46-2-1 x ADT 43 (tropical japonica/indica) and IR 66158-38-3-2-1 x Odaebayeo (tropical japonica/joponica). Hence, these hybrids were recommended for heterosis breeding.

30. M. VAITHIYALINGAN AND N. NADARAJAN [Correlation and path analysis in inter sub-specific rice hybrids]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 287-289 (2005). Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics Agricultural College and Research Institute, Madurai-625 104, India.


ABSTRACT

To assess the nature and magnitude of association between grain yield and its component characters of inter sub-specific rice hybrids, a study was conducted at Agricultural College and Research Institute, Madurai. The characters viz., pollen fertility per cent, plant height, productive tillers per plant, panicle length, number of grains per panicle, spikelet fertility and test weight had positive significant correlation with grain yield. The path analysis disclosed that the character number of grains per panicle had the highest positive direct effect on yield followed by productive tillers per plant. The results revealed that the direct selection for the above mentioned traits could improve the grain yield in inter racial rice hybrids.


31. SALEJ SOOD, K. C. SOOD AND SANJEEV KUMAR [Genetic diversity in rice]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 290-292 (2005). Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India.


ABSTRACT

Genetic divergence study in 43 rice genotypes of Himachal Pradesh for 10 yield contributing traits including yield per plant led to their grouping into nine clusers. Grouping of genotypes in different clusters indicated the existing of significant amount of variability among the genotypes for the traits studied. Cluster IV showed highest intra-cluster distance. However, high order of divergence was recorded between clusters VII and IX followed by the clusters VII and VIII. Based on the mean performance, genetic distance and clustering pattern, hybridization involving genotypes HPR 824 and KC 1 (Achhoo) are likely to give desirable segregants for yield and its component traits.


32. R. SURESH AND Y. ANBUSELVAM [Variability studies for yield and its component traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 293-294 (2005). Department of Agricultural Botany Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (Tamil Nadu), India.


ABSTRACT

Genetic variability for yield and its component traits in 36 genotypes of rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been carried out. Considerable amount of genotypic coefficient of variation, heritability and genetic advance were noticed for the traits viz., number of filled grains per panicle and grain yield per plant, which in turn indicated the additive gene action for the control of these traits and there was scope for genetic improvement by adopting suitable selection procedure.


33. POORAN CHAND1 AND P. J. M. RAO [Inheritance of yield and its components in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 295-296 (2005). A. N. G. R. A. U. Agricultural Research Station, Madhira-507 203, India.


ABSTRACT

Dominance gene effects played an important role in determining the inheritance of majority of traits under study. All the three types of gene interactions were present indicating the complex behaviour of genes governing the traits. Duplicate type of epistasis was observed in all the crosses for all the traits except for earhead breadth and grain yield in SPV-422 x Moti (C2), where it is complementary type of interaction.

34. SHER SINGH1 [Correlation and interaction studies in greengram under various phosphorus and thiourea levels]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 297-299 (2005). Department of Agronomy R. A. U. College of Agriculture, Beechwal, Bikaner-334 006 (Rajasthan), India.


ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Agronomy Farm of College of Agriculture, Bikaner (Rajasthan) during kharif 1998 to study the effect of phosphorus and thiourea on greengram. The treatments consisted of four levels of phosphorus (0, 25, 50 and 75 kg P2O5/ha) and five applications of thiourea (TU) [control (TUC), TU seed soaking (TUS), TU foliar spray at branching (TUFb), TU foliar spray at flowering (TUFf) and TU seed soaking+foliar spray at pre-flowering (TUS+Fpf)]. The treatment combination P75+TUS+Fpf recorded maximum seed and straw yield, while P50+TUS+Fpf resulted in maximum net returns and benefit : cost ratio. Minimum seed and straw yield, net returns and benefit : cost ratio were obtained in the control (P0+TUC) which was significantly lower to all other treatment combinations. Seed yield was significantly and positively correlated with growth attributes, nodule dry weight, chlorophyll content, yield attributes and nutrient uptake.

35. C. VANNIARAJAN, SANJEEV SAXENA1 AND T. NEPOLEAN [Cryopreservation of lucerne]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 300-302 (2005). Centre for Plant Breeding & Genetics Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore (Tamil Nadu), India.


ABSTRACT

Cryopreservation of the plant genetic resources is an extension of the significant advances made in freeze preservation of animal germplasm through storage of sperms. This technique was tried in storage of lucerne, a forage crop called as “The Queen of the Forage” crops. Variety CO 1 seeds of lucerne were subjected to moisture content of 15, 10, 5 and 3% and stored at vapour phase (-1500C) of liquid storage. After 48 h, seeds were taken and observations on germination percentage, seedling vigour, speed of germination and electrical conductivity were recorded. The study inferred that the lucerne seeds could be successfully stored under cryopreservation with reduced moisture content of the seeds (5 and 3%).

36. A. SHEEBA, J. ANBUMALARMATHI, S. BABU AND S. M. IBRAHIM [Mutagenic effect of gamma rays and EMS in M1 generation in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 303-306 (2005). Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics Agricultural College and Research Institute, Madurai-625 014 (Tamil Nadu) India.


ABSTRACT

Two varieties of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.), namely, SVPR 1 and Co 1 were treated with physical mutagen viz., gamma rays and chemical mutagen viz., EMS. The mutagenic effects of mutagens in terms of damages caused to biological material in M1 generation were studied. Seed germination, seedling survival, plant height on 30 DAS and pollen fertility were reduced significantly with an increase in dosage levels of both the mutagens. More than 50% reduction in germination and seedling survival was observed in higher dosages of 60 and 70 krad in gamma rays and 1.4 and 1.6% in EMS. Among the two varieties, SVPR 1 was more sensitive than Co 1 to both the mutagens. The mean values for productive traits such as number of capsules plant-1, 1000-seed weight and single plant yield showed a proportionate increase and reached maximum at middle doses of 50 krad in gamma rays and 1.2% of EMS, thereafter with a decrease in higher dosages of gamma rays and EMS.

37. D. RATNA BABU, P. V. RAMA KUMAR AND CH. V. DURGA RANI [Genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance of seed yield and its components in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 307-308 (2005). Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Hyderabad (Andhra Pradesh), India.


ABSTRACT

The analysis of variance of four lines, three testers and 12 hybrids obtained from line x tester mating indicated significant differences among all the 19 genotypes of sesame for all the characters under study. The analysis of genetic parameters revealed narrow difference between GCV and GCV. Estimates of heritability were high for all the characters, while genetic advance as per cent of mean was high for seed yield per plant, number of seeds per capsule, number of primaries, number of capsules per plant and 1000-seed weight. Medium genetic advance as per cent of mean was recorded by days to 50% flowering and plant height. Oil content and days to maturity had a low genetic advance as per cent of mean. This indicated that simple selection could be effective for improving majority of characters including seed yield per plant.

38. P. J. M. RAO1, R. K. SINGH AND J. SINGH [Stability studies of induced mutants of field bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) by electrophoregrams of cotyledon storage proteins]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 309-310 (2005). Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding Institute of Agricultural Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (U. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Twelve mutants were selected in M3 generation. Experiments were conducted for these 12 mutants alongwith parent cultivar PDR-14 for different nitrogen fixing and yield component traits. Mainly the mutants selection was based on phenotypic performance of different traits under study. In order to confirm the genetic differences for these 12 mutants from their parent variety, electrophoretic studies were undertaken by using seed storage protein marker. Results showed distinguished banding pattern confirming the phenotypic differences which were truely due to genotypic differences amongst the mutants as well as the parent. The banding pattern did not change with advance in generation confirming the stability of the mutants for each genotype in both the generations.

39. V. W. BENDALE, S. D. KUMBHAR, S. G. BHAVE, J. L. MEHTA AND U. B. PETHE [Heterosis for yield components in Lablab bean [Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 311-313 (2005). College of Agriculture, Dapoli-415 712 (Maharashtra), India.

ABSTRACT

Heterosis for grain yield and its component characters was studied in 15 corsses of Lablab bean [Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet] from six diverse parents in half diallel fashion (excluding reciprocals). The crosses showed significant heterosis over mid parent and also over better parent. The percentage of heterosis for seed yield in F1s over their respective mid parents ranged from -24.296 to 159.824% and over better parents the range was -32.177 to 101.195%. Three top crosses involved medium x low yielding parental lines. In almost all the crosses, heterosis in yield was accompanied by heterosis in pods per plant, harvest index, peduncles per plant and most the other characters under study.

40. A. MANU PARMAR AND TARSEM LAL [Variability studies in melon (Cucumis melo L.)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 314-317 (2005). Department of Vegetable Crops Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141 004 (Punjab), India.

ABSTRACT

Phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation, heritability (broad sense) and genetic advance were assessed in 50 genotypes of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Analysis of variance showed sufficient variability for all the characters studied. Genotypes MM-28, Punjab Sunehri, Pusa Sharbati, Kajri, PSGP-2-6-1, RM-43, Silver World and Australia-98-1 were observed to possess the maximum number of characters, with mean values better than the general mean. The highest genotypic (91.09%) and phenotypic (93.32%) coefficients of variability were recorded for number of fruits per vine. The estimates of heritability in broad sense were very high (>75%) for all the characters except node at which the first female flower opens. Number of fruits per vine showed the highest genetic advance (183.15%). High heritability alongwith high genetic advance as percentage of mean was observed for number of fruits per vine and rind thickness. Hence, these traits are the most suitable for further improvement through selection.

41. A. K. SINGH AND B. R. CHAUDHARY [Genetic architecture : Heterosis and inbreeding depression in chillies]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 318-321 (2005). Centre of Advanced Study in Botany Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (U. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Heterosis and inbreeding depression for 14 yield and yield attributing characters in 15 F1 hybrids derived from seven parents were studied in chillies (Capsicum annuum). Heterosis for total fresh yield/plant was considerable and it ranged from 7.40-33.24% in the crosses IC-119367 x Pusa Sadabahar and EC-305591 x Punjab Lal, respectively. Highest positive and significant heterosis over mid parent was recorded for the cross EC-305591 x RHRC-CE followed by EC-305591 x Punjab Lal. Positive and significant inbreeding depression was observed for the two crosses only. For number of fruits per plant of the 15 crosses attempted only four of them showed positive and significant heterosis over better parent. The maximum positive and significant value over mid parent was shown by the cross IC-119797 x RHRC-CE. In general, the dominant effect was linearly associated with the expression of heterosis. Crosses exhibiting high heterosis for the total fresh yield/plant were also good heterosis crosses for some of the yield component characters, such as number of fruits/plant, fruit length and the number of seeds/fruit.

42. REENA MATHEW, B. S. BENIWAL, S. K. BHATIA AND D. P. DESWAL [Variability and correlation studies in African marigold (Tagetes erecta L.)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 322-327 (2005). Department of Horticulture CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

The variability and heritability studies were undertaken for 24 characters in 15 genotypes of African marigold, which depicted significant differences in all the characters under study. The coefficient of variation both at genotypic and phenotypic levels was maximum for seed yield. Other characters with high GCV and PCV were dry weight of flower, flower yield, seed vigour and fresh weight of flower. High heritability alongwith high genetic advance (GA) were recorded for characters like number of buds per plant, number of flowers per plant, flower yield and seed vigour which may prove effective criteria for selection. The correlation study assessed the relative contribution of different yield attributing characters on flower and seed yield. The characters like seed yield per plant, buds per plant and number of flowers per plant showed highly significant correlation with flower yield, while number of flowers, number of buds and flower yield per plant showed highly significant contribution to seed yield.

43. REENA MATHEW, B. S. BENIWAL, S. K. BHATIA AND D. P. DESWAL [Path coefficient analysis for flower production in French marigold (Tagetes patula L.)]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 328-331 (2005). Department of Horticulture CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

Path coefficient analysis was worked out for flower production in 15 genotypes of French marigold. The direct and indirect effects of various characters alongwith their genotypic correlation with flower yield per plant were determined. Maximum direct effect on flower yield was exhibited by number of flowers per plant and fresh weight of flower. Positive and highly significant correlation with flower yield was obtained by number of buds/plant, number of flowers/plant, fresh weight of flower and dry weight flower.

44. S. S. DASHAD, YOGESH KUMAR AND BILOCHAN DAHIYA [Evaluation of small seeded lentil genotypes of different maturity groups against Etiella zinckenella Tr.]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 332-336 (2005). CCSHAU Regional Research Station, Bawal-123 501, Rewari (Haryana), India

ABSTRACT

The larval population in the small seeded lentil genotypes ranged from 5.08-9.08, 4.67-8.92 and 4.75-8.83 larvae per plant in short, medium and long duration lentil genotypes, respectively. The pest infestation at green pod stage varied from 7.03-14.10, 6.80-13.67 and 7.97-12.63% as compared to 10.73-18.87, 9.77-16.87 and 10.43-19.60% at maturity in the different maturity groups, respectively. The seed yield in small seeded genotypes ranged from 10.67-19.00 q/ha in short duration group, whereas it varied from 8.83-19.00 q/ha in medium and long duration lentil genotypes. More larval population was recorded in short duration genotypes (7.18 larvae/plant) compared to the medium (6.94 larvae) and long duration (6.55 larvae) ones with similar trends for the per cent pod damage both at green as well as mature pod stages. Small seeded short duration genotypes were found to be most susceptible among these groups with average infestation above 15%.

45. NARENDRA KUMAR, V. S. MALIK AND J. S. RANA [Relative abundance of predatory coccinellids on oliferous Brassica]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 337-342 (2005). Department of Entomology CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana) India.

ABSTRACT

During a study on the abundance of coccinellid predators on different oliferous Brassica, it was found that Coccinella septempunctata (Linn.) was most abundant species (57.7%), followed by Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Fab.) (21.5%) and Coccinella transversalis (Fab.) (20.8%). The relative abundance of C. septempunctata was found maximum on RH 8701 (65.3%) and minimum (50.05%) on B. carinata var. HC 9605. The population of C. sexmaculata was maximum on B. juncea var. JMM 927 (27.56%) and minimum (15.57%) on B. carinata var. HC 9605. C. transversalis was recorded maximum on B. carinata var. HC 9605 (34.43%) and minimum on B. napus var. HNS 9605 (17.58%).

46. R. SUDHAKAR, K. CHANDRASEKHARA RAO AND C. S. REDDY1 [Chemical control of rice sheath blight incited by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn.]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 343-348 (2005). Department of Plant Pathology Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Studies on control of sheath blight of rice (Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn.) indicated that carbendazim (0.1%) and hexaconazole (0.2%) were effective in not only reducing the diseasae, but also in increasing the grain and straw yields, followed by cyproconazole, propiconazole, tebuconazole and pencycuron. Mancozeb was found to be inferior to other fungicides. Among the fungicides tested in vitro, the carbendazim, hexaconazole and propiconazole were found to be highly effective. Systemic fungicides performed better than non-systemic fungicides in reducing the disease incidence.

47. G. D. MATE, V. V. DESHMUKH, D. J. JIOTODE, N. S. CHORE AND MAYUR DIKKAR [Efficacy of plant products and fungicides on tomato early blight caused by Alternaria solani]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 349-351 (2005). Department of Plant Pathology Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola-444 104 (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

Early blight incited by Alternaria solani (ELL and MART) Jones and Grout is a serious disease of tomato. Three fungicides and two plant products were tested against Alternaria solani fruit rot under natural and artificial conditions. Reduction in yield due to Alternaria blight was recorded as 70.05 and 62.41 q/ha under natural and artificial conditions. Maximum radial mycelium growth inhibition was recorded in Dithane-M 45 (89.98%). However, maximum growth inhibition was recorded in eucalyptus leaf extract (59.27%).

48. G. D. MATE, V. V. DESHMUKH, D. J. JIOTODE, N. S. CHORE AND MAYUR DIKKAR [Screening of tomato cultivar for resistance to early blight]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 352-353 (2005). Department of Plant Pathology Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola-444 104 (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

Early blight incited by Alternaria solani (ELL and MART) Jones and Grout is a serious disease of tomato. Thirty-one cultivars were screened for disease resistance under natural and artificial inoculation. None of the cultivars was found to be resistant. However, four varieties, namely, ATH-1, ATH-2, Samridhi and Vaishali showed moderately resistant reaction. Nine cultivars i. e. EC-321926, EC-321928, ATV-1, ATV-2, S-28, Devgiri, Roma, HS-101 and Marglobe were found moderately susceptible.

49. V. L. K. VARMA, N. MANOHAR REDDY, K. KESHAVULU AND R. ANKAIAH [Identification of maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes through morphological characters]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 354-356 (2005). Department of Seed Science & Technology Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Despite introduction of a range of laboratory methods for varietal identification, morphological traits of plant are a major component of cultivar identification because they provide the most appropriate data on the spot. Twenty-five maize genotypes under study showed variation for form of first leaf tip, anthocyanin pigmentation of first leaf sheath, anthocyanin pigmentation of leaf sheath, leaf attitude, hairs on margin of leaf sheath and attitude of tassel branches. Schematic diagram for identifying each individual genotype at field level is presented.

50. M. L. DOGNEY [Significance of grow out test (GOT) in certified seed production of wheat]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 357-358 (2005). M. P. State Seed Certification Agency GOT, Farm, Delmi, Dhar (M. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

The analysis of grow out test (GOT) was worked out in 15 varieties of wheat (Triticum aestivum and T. durum) viz., C-306, DL 788-2, DL 803-3, GW 173, GW 273, GW 496, HD 2189, HI 83-81, HI 84-98, HW 2004, JWS-17, Lok-1, Raj 3077, Sujata and WH-147 wheat varieties. JWS-17 and HI 83-81 exhibited significant difference for genetic purity at 1% level of probability and HD 2189 showed significant difference at 5% level of probability; rest of all varieties exhibited no significant difference, whereas all deteriorating factors showed significant difference with regards to varieties.

51. B. DHAWAN, V. KUMAR1, S. SHARMA, G. R .S. BISHT, B. P. SINGH2 AND N. NARULA3 [Secondary metabolites producing Azotobacter chroococcum soil isolates affecting wheat growth in chlorpyrifos amended soil]. Res. on crops 6 (2) : 359-364 (2005). Department of Microbiology, Division of Life Sciences SBS Post Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences & Research, Balawala, Dehradun-248 161, India.

ABSTRACT

A pot experiment was conducted in green house to investigate the proliferation and survival of chlorpyrifos resistant A. chroococcum soil isolates and their effect on wheat growth parameters in chlorpyrifos amended and non-amended soil. All the soil isolates were secondary metabolites producer viz., indole acetic acid, ammonia excretion, nitrogenase activity, phosphate solubilization and amino acid. In vitro studies on plumule and radicle exhibited higher growth and germination over control. In pots, plant height was 14-17%, 1000-grain weight 17-19% and grain yield was 11-15% more over control in chlorpyrifos amended and non-amended soil on overall basis. The root biomass was 19-27 % higher over control in both the treatments. The maximum bacterial count was on 45th and declined on 60th day, which was more in chlorpyrifos non-amended soil as compared to chlorpyrifos amended soil.