Volume 53, Number 5&6 (September & November 2018)

By | December 5, 2018

1. Saddam A. Al-Dalain* [Intercropping system of Beekia (Vetch sativa L.)-barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) mixtures grown under arid and semi-arid conditions in Jordan : Effect of seeding rate and mixture ratio]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 195-201 (2018). Al-Shoubak University College Al-Balqa Applied University, Al-Salt 19117, Jordan *(e-mail : sadam.dalaeen@bau.edu.jo)

ABSTRACT

This research was performed to evaluate the influence of different mixed cropping patterns of local Beekia sativa (Beekia) with or without barley on herbage yield under arid (Ghweer) and semi-arid conditions (Mutah) in Jordan. Five patterns of mixture ratios of barley and Beekia were used as following : 0 : 100, 25 : 75, 50 : 50, 75 : 25 and 100 : 0 at three levels of plant densities : low (150 seeds/m2), medium (300 seeds/m2) and high (450 seeds/m2) were arranged in complete randomized blocks with three replications. The results of this study showed that three levels of plant density (number of seeds/m2) had a significant effect on herbage yield on both fresh and dry weight basis at both studied locations (Ghweer and Mutah). Increasing plant density positively enhanced herbage yield being lowest at planting density of 150 seeds/m2 and highest at planting density 450 seeds/m2. This study also revealed that intercropping at different ratios positively enhanced herbage yield (both on fresh and dry basis) when compared to herbage yield produced when planting either Beekia or barley alone. Among all mixture ratios, barley : Beekia mixture at ratio 75 : 25 was superior on herbage yield on both fresh and dry mater basis. Intercropping 75 : 25 mixture of barley : Beekia at medium (300 seeds/m2) and high (450 seeds/m2) planting density can be effective strategy to maximize herbage yield under dry and semi-dry conditions. Barley and Beekia mixture seems to be a promising approach to be profitable for farmers in maximizing herbage yield per unit area under arid and semi-arid conditions in Jordan.

2. L. ALIYU*, S. MANZO, R. A. YAHAYA, I. M. HARUNA AND S. M. BUGAJE [Response of moringa (Moringa oleifera Lam) to nitrogen and intra-row spacing at Samaru, Nigeria]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 202-205 (2018). 1Department of Agronomy Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria *(e-mail : lamidoaliyu06@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

A field trial was established in 2015 at the Research Farm of the Institute for Agricultural Research, Ahmadu Bello University, Samaru, Zaria (11011N; 7038 E and 686 m above sea level). The trial was maintained and data were subsequently collected from the crop in 2016 and 2017. The treatments consisted of four nitrogen rates (0, 50, 100 and 150 N kg/ha) and three intra-row spacings (20, 30 and 40 cm). Factorial combinations of the treatment were laid out in a randomized complete block design and replicated three times. The results showed that in 2015 application of 150 kg N/ha resulted in significantly taller plants, thicker stems, higher leaf nitrogen content and uptake and higher fresh leaf yield compared with 50 kg N/ha and the control. Number of leaves per plant was not significantly affected by nitrogen application. Similarly, the effect of intra-row spacing on plant height, stem diameter and number of leaves was not significant. However, N uptake and leaf fresh yield were significantly increased by spacing plants at 30 cm compared with 20 cm, while 20 cm resulted in significantly higher nitrogen content in leaves compared with 30 cm. Application of 100 and 150 kg N/ha was comparable statistically and higher than 50 kg N/ha and the control which were significantly at par in fruit yield and number of fruits per plant. Fresh leaf yield, fruit and seed yields were significantly increased by 20 cm compared with other spacings. Number of fruits/plant and number seeds per fruit were maximized by 30 cm in 2017. Application of N at 150 kg/ha and intra-row spacing of 20 cm were, therefore, recommended for maximum yield of moringa leaves, fruits and seeds.

3. Rohit B. Umbarkar* and Narayan B. Pandhure [Influence of integrated weed management on growth, productivity and economics of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 206-208 (2018). 1Department of Agronomy College of Agriculture, Loni-413 736 (Maharashtra), India *(e-mail : umbarkar_rohit@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at College of Agriculture, Loni Farm during 2015 and 2016 on silty clay loam soil with 7.4 pH. The climatic conditions during experimental period were favourable. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with three replications. The treatments consisted of combination of cultural treatments, pre- and post- emergence herbicides as well as unweed check. The results showed that the growth parameters, yield attributes, seed yield and straw yield were increased significantly by treatment 3 HW at 20, 40 and 60 DAS which was at par with treatments pendimethalin @ 750 g a. i./ha as pre-emergence fb hoeing at 30 DAS, metsulfuron methyl @ 5 g a. i./ha POE at 20 DAS fb hoeing at 30 DAS, metribuzin @ 200 g a. i./ha POE at 20 DAS fb hoeing at 30 DAS and 2,4-D @ 500 g a. e./ha POE at 20 DAS fb hoeing at 30 DAS which was followed by treatment metsulfuron methyl @ 5 g a. i./ha POE at 20 DAS and metribuzin @ 200 g a. i./ha POE at 20 DAS. The B : C ratio and net returns were found significantly higher in treatment pendimethalin @ 750 g a. i./ha as pre-emergence fb hoeing at 30 DAS. Minimum growth parameters, yield attributes, yield and economics were noticed in treatment unweeded control.

4. B. D. Patel*, D. D. Chaudhari, V. J. Patel, H. K. Patel and Aakash Mishra [Weed dynamics and production potential of kharif maize (Zea mays L.) as influenced by new generation herbicides]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 209-214 (2018). AICRP-Weed Management, B. A. College of Agriculture Anand Agricultural University, Anand-388 110 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : bdpatel62@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

Field experiment was carried out at AICRP on Weed Management Farm, Anand Agricultural University, Anand during kharif 2016 in sandy loam soil to study the effect of new generation herbicides on weed control and yield of kharif maize. The results indicated that application of atrazine 500 g/ha+pendimethalin 250 g/ha PE fb 2,4-D 1000 g/ha LPoE provided effective control of monocot, dicot and total weeds as well as recorded higher grain yield (5.38 t/ha), net returns (Rs. 56300/ha) and B : C ratio (2.98) and it was followed by application of topramezone 25.2 + atrazine 500 EPoE fb IC + HW at 30 DAS, which recorded grain yield, net returns and B : C ratio of 5.11 t/ha, Rs. 47292/ha and 2.42, respectively.

5. AMANDEEP KAUR* AND MAHESH KUMAR [Growth, crop phenology and PAR interception in kharif maize (Zea mays L.) as influenced by planting methods and nitrogen levels]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 215-220 (2018). 1Department of Agronomy Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141 004 (Punjab), India *(e-mail : amugorsian@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana during kharif 2015 to study the influence of three planting methods (flat, ridge and bed planting) and five nitrogen levels (0, 90, 120, 150 and 180 kg N/ha) on the growth, phenology and PAR interception in kharif maize. Bed planting method produced significantly higher LAI, DMA, leaf chlorophyll content, cob length, cob girth, number of rows per cob and grain yield of maize as compared to flat sowing method but was statistically at par with ridge planting method. Maximum PAR interception of 78.2% was registered at 90 DAS when the crop was raised on beds. Tasselling, silking and physiological maturity were enhanced by 2.3 to 2.5, 3.3 to 3.7 and 2.2 to 2.6 days, respectively, under bed and ridge planting methods as compared to flat sowing method. Application of 150 kg N/ha recorded significantly higher LAI, DMA, leaf chlorophyll content, PAR interception, cob length, cob girth, number of rows per cob and grain yield over 120, 90 and control but at par with 180 kg N/ha. Maximum PAR interception of 82.8% was observed with application of 180 kg N/ha at 90 DAS which was significantly higher than 0, 90 and 120 kg N/ha but was at par with 150 kg N/ha. Nitrogen application enhanced the tasselling and silking stages but delayed the physiological maturity stage.

6. RAMANDEEP KAUR* AND CHARANJEET KAUR [Growth, yield and quality of maize (Zea mays L.) as influenced by straw mulching and herbicides]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 221-229 (2018). Department of Agronomy Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141 004 (Punjab), India *(e-mail : ramandeepkaur201533@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The field experiment was carried out at Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana and Regional Research Station Gurdaspur (PAU) during kharif 2017 to assess the effect of straw mulching and weed control treatments on growth parameters, yield and quality of maize. Application of paddy straw mulch at 9.0 t/ha produced significantly higher plant height, dry matter accumulation, leaf area index and grain yield in comparison to 6.25 t/ha mulch and no mulch treatments; however, 6.25 and 9.0 t/ha mulch treatments remained statistically at par with each other with respect to number of leaves per plant. Straw mulch at 6.25 t/ha also resulted in significantly higher plant height, number of leaves per plant, dry matter accumulation, leaf area index and grain yield than no mulch treatment. Among the herbicide treatments, post-emergence application of tembotrione at 0.088 kg/ha recorded significantly higher plant height, number of leaves per plant, dry matter accumulation, leaf area index and grain yield as compared to pre-emergence application of atrazine at 0.8 kg/ha, atrazine at 1.0 kg/ha and unweeded check but remained statistically at par with tembotrione at 0.110 kg/ha and weed free treatments. Protein and oil contents in maize grains were not significantly influenced by different straw mulch and weed control treatments.

7. G. RAJITHA*, M. SRINIVASA REDDY AND P. V. RAMESH BABU [Yield and uptake of primary nutrients by groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) as influenced by foliar spray of secondary and micronutrients]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 230-232 (2018). Department of Agronomy, Agricultural College, Mahanandi-518 502 Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University (Andhra Pradesh), India *(e-mail : rajitha.agrico@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Among oilseed crops, groundnut is an important edible oilseed crop of our country and edible oil economy primarily depends upon groundnut production. Calcium, magnesium and sulphur requirements are highest in oil seed crops followed by pulses and least in cereals. Secondary and micronutrient fertilization is essential for enhancing the productivity of groundnut crop. The response of groundnut to secondary and micronutrients was studied on sandy loam soils of Agricultural College Farm, Mahanandi, Andhra Pradesh during rabi 2015. The experiment comprised 10 treatments consisting of recommended dose of NPK through soil application and foliar application of secondary and micronutrients. Combined foliar application of secondary and micronutrients along with RDF recorded significantly highest pod yield of 2654 kg/ha and haulm yield of 3603 kg/ha as compared to RDF (1500 and 2551 kg/ha of pod and haulm yield, respectively) and also the highest uptake of primary nutrients (N, P and K) by haulm and pod at harvest which might be because of highest dry matter production with the combined use of all the nutrients.

8. T. DHIVYA AND R. SINGARAVEL* [Effect of clay and manure addition on soil properties and Zn availability for blackgram in coastal sandy soils]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 233-236 (2018). Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar-608 002 (Tamil Nadu), India *(e-mail : singar_vel@yahoo.co.in)

ABSTRACT

Among micronutrients, zinc deficiency is occurring in both the crops and human. Zinc deficiency is widespread in sandy soil of coastal agro-ecosystem owing to low organic matter, CEC, high leaching, etc. One pot experiment was carried out in the Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture during February-March 2017, to evaluate the influence of clay and organic amendments viz., FYM and humic acid on the soil properties and Zn availability for blackgram in sandy soil. The soil was sandy, slightly saline with pH 8.07 and represented low available NPK and Zn status. In a completely randomized design, the following treatments, namely, T1–Control (100% recommended dose of NPK), T2–NPK+ZnSO4 @ 25 kg/ha, T3–T2+Clay @ 20 t/ha, T4–T3+Humic acid @ 20 kg/ha and T5–T3+FYM @ 12.5 t/ha were studied using four replications. Blackgram variety ADT 3 was grown during the crop period. Various growth, yield parameters and yield were recorded and post-harvest soil samples were analyzed for the soil properties, available major nutrients and micronutrient Zn. The results of the study indicated that the application of both the amendments was efficient in improving the growth, yield of blackgram and also Zn availability and zinc use efficiency. Among the treatments T4, application of NPK+ZnSO4 @ 25 kg/ha+clay @ 20 t/ha+humic acid @ 20 kg/ha accounted for a significant increase in the DTPA-Zn content in soil besides improving the organic carbon and available nutrient status.

9. Porismita Dutta*, Utpal Kotoky and Kaushik Das [Response of integrated plant nutrient management on soil chemical and biological properties of guava (Psidium guajava L.) cv. Allahabad Safeda]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 237-241 (2018). 1Department of Horticulture Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785 013 (Assam), India *(e-mail : porismita9@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted to study the integrated plant nutrient management in guava (Psidium guajava L.) cv. Allahabad Safeda in the Experimental Farm and Laboratory, Department of Horticulture, Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat during 2015-17. A total of nine treatments including a control with three replications and two seasons were laid out in a randomized block design. During the period of investigation, the treatments showed varied response to soil parameters. Studies revealed that soil N, P, K, MBC and various soil enzymes such as dehydrogenase, phosphomonoesterase, fluorescein di-acetate hydrolase, bacterial and fungal population were found to be the highest in T8 (Half of RDF+10 kg vermicompost+100 g microbial consortium+0.4% ZnSO4+0.4% boric acid).

10. Lalrinchhani, B. N. Hazarika* and Megha Raghavan [Effect of micronutrients on growth and yield of banana cv. Grand Naine (AAA) under foothills of Arunachal Pradesh]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 242-246 (2018). Department of Fruit Science Central Agricultural University, Pasighat-791 102 (Arunachal Pradesh), India *(e-mail : bnhazarika13@yahoo.co.in)

ABSTRACT

The present investigation was carried out in the Experimental Farm, Department of Fruit Science, College of Horticulture and Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat, Arunachal Pradesh. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with nine treatments and three replications. Treatments given were : T1–Control, T2–Foliar spray of ZnSO4 (0.5%), T3–Foliar spray of FeSO4 (0.2%), T4–Foliar spray of CuSO4 (0.2%), T5–Foliar spray of H3BO3 (0.1%), T6–Combination of foliar spray of H3BO3 (0.1%) and CuSO4 (0.2%), T7–Combination of foliar spray of ZnSO4 (0.5%) and FeSO4 (0.2%), T8–Combination of foliar spray of ZnSO4 (0.5%), FeSO4 (0.2%) and CuSO4 (0.2%) and T9–Combination of foliar spray of ZnSO4 (0.5%), FeSO4 (0.2%), CuSO4 (0.2%) and H3BO3 (0.1%). All the treatments except control were effective in increasing growth and yield. The highest pseudostem height (231.71 cm) was observed in T8, while girth (72.85 cm), leaf area (12.76 m2) and leaf area index (5.34) were highest in T9. Maximum increase in production of fruits (50.75 t/ha) was recorded in treatment T9, while yield was minimum (33.03 t/ha) in T1–Control. Better growth and yield were observed in combination of the treatments. The highest cost : benefit ratio was observed in T9 (1 : 2.72). Hence, the treatment T9–Combination of foliar spray of ZnSO4 (0.5%), FeSO4 (0.2%), CuSO4 (0.2%) and H3BO3 (0.1%) was considered the best treatment among all the other treatments in attaining better growth and yield of fruits.

11. B. D. Patel*, D. D. Chaudhari, H. K. Patel, Aakash Mishra, V. J. Patel and D. J. Parmar [Effect of organic manures and weed management practices on weeds, yield and soil microbial properties in fennel]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 247-251 (2018). AICRP-Weed Management, B. A. College of Agriculture Anand Agricultural University, Anand-388 110 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : bdpatel62@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif-rabi season of the year 2017-18 at AICRP-Weed Management Farm, AAU, Anand to study the effect of organic manures and weed management practices on weeds, yield and soil microbial properties in fennel. The results revealed that application of paddy straw mulch applied at 5 and 10 t/ha fb HW at 30 and 60 days after transplanting (DATP) and IC+HW at 30 and 60 DATP fb earthing-up at 75 days after transplanting recorded significantly lower density and dry biomass of monocot, dicot and total weeds. The periodically plant height, number of umbels/plant and seed yield of fennel, as well as soil microbial properties were also recorded higher under these treatments. Application of FYM and vermicompost helped in building up the bacterial, fungal and actinobacter population at all the intervals. However, positive effect of organic manure treatments was not observed with respect to growth and yield attributes of fennel.

12. S. M. PATIL, V. K. KAUTHALE*, Y. P. NAVALE AND A. D. NALAWADE [Variability study in hyacinth bean [Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet] landraces from tribal blocks of Maharashtra, India]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 252-256 (2018). BAIF Development Research Foundation Dr. Manibhai Desai Nagar, NH-4 Warje, Pune-411 058 (Maharashtra), India *(e-mail : vitthal.kauthale@baif.org.in)

ABSTRACT

Morpho-agronomic characters of 33 landraces of hyacinth bean collected from farmers residing in tribal blocks of Maharashtra were evaluated at in situ conservation centers at Akole in Ahmednagar district and BAIF Central Research Station, Urulikanchan, Pune during the year 2016-17. The results of the study revealed that the indeterminate growth habit (93.9%), green stem colour (48.5%), terminal inflorescence (54.5%), white flower colour (57.6%), straight pods (42.4%), green colour pods (51.5%), round and oval shaped seeds (27.3%) and reddish brown seed colour (42.4%) were dominant characters in evaluated landraces. Analysis of variance indicated that variations in all the characters were highly significant among the landraces. The study revealed significant variation in flowers per inflorescence (9.4- 82.8), pods per inflorescence (1.4-12.0), pod length (3.7-18.1 cm) and 100-seed weight (16.7-75.9 g). This diverse gene pool of hyacinth bean landraces is valuable resource in future for promotional and varietal improvement program.

13. Ravi Kumar Theodore* and N. Venkatesa Palanichamy [Use of mechanical transplanter for rice cultivation in Cauvery delta districts of Tamil Nadu : Impact and feedback assessment]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 257-264 (2018). Kumaraguru Institute of AgricultureSakthinagar-638 315, Erode District (Tamil Nadu), India *(e-mail : rk.theodore@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The Government of Tamil Nadu during June 2015 had announced the “Kuruvai Special Assistance 2015 for Delta Districts” programme to boost rice production and productivity in the state. Among others, promotion of ‘Machine Transplantation’ of rice seedlings was one of the main components of this special package. To assess the success of this programme, a study was conducted to assess the impact of mechanical planting versus conventional planting, cost and returns, and feedback of farmers. The comparative economics of conventional and machine planting revealed the following : yield increased by nearly 40.00%; cost of cultivation decreased by 21.00%; cost of production reduced by 43.00% and ultimately net returns increased by more than four times (448.00%), over the manually planted fields. Farmers’ feedback on machine planting was very optimistic with all the beneficiaries expressing that they had opted for machine planting to overcome labour scarcity, and to increase their yields. Major merits perceived by the beneficiaries included : mental agony due to rice cultivation had reduced significantly, significant increase in productive tillers, and reduction in seed rate which led to decrease in cost of production. On the whole, it was found that nearly two-third (65.00 %) of the beneficiaries were cent per cent satisfied with the government initiative.

14. Ramesh Kumar*, Jailal Yadav, Ashok Dhillon, Neeraj Pawar1 and Yogita Bali [Realizing productivity and profitability of greengram through cluster front line demonstrations (CFLDs)]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 265-267 (2018). CCSHAU Krishi Vigyan Kendra Mahendergarh-123 029 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : rkumaragro@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Cluster frontline demonstrations on greengram were conducted at farmers’ fields during kharif 2016 and 2017 in Mahendergarh district of Haryana state. Cultivation of greengram by adopting improved practices resulted in 20.9% yield increase over farmers’ practice. The average gross returns, average net returns, additional net returns and benefit : cost ratio with improved technology came out to be Rs. 37175/ha, Rs. 18625/ha, Rs. 4825/ha and 1.99, respectively. The average extension and technology gaps were recorded as 125.8 and 756.5 kg/ha, respectively. The technology index of 50.4% strongly indicated the technological inadequacies in greengram cultivation in the district and productivity at farmers’ fields can be increased by adopting improved technology.

15. Ramesh Kumar*, Ashok Dhillon, Jailal Yadav, Neeraj Pawar and Yogita Bali [Increasing productivity and profitability of sesame through cluster frontline demonstrations]. Crop Res. 53 (5&6) : 268-270 (2018). CCSHAU Krishi Vigyan Kendra Mahendergarh-123 029 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : rkumaragro@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Cluster frontline demonstrations on sesame crop were conducted at farmers’ fields in Mahendergarh district of Haryana state during kharif 2016 and 2017. Cultivation of sesame by adopting improved practices in demonstration resulted in 21.8% yield increase over farmers’ practice. The average gross returns, net returns and benefit : cost ratio in demonstration plots came out to be Rs. 41618/ha, Rs. 24700/ha and 2.46, respectively. The higher yield and returns in demonstrations indicated that productivity of sesame at farmers’ fields could be increased by adopting improved practices.

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