Volume 46, Number 1, 2 & 3 (November 2013)

By | July 14, 2014

1. P. V. Ramesh Babu, A. Chandrakala, Ch. Pulla Rao, Y. Ashoka Rani, V. Srinivasa Rao and R. Veeraraghavaiah [Yield and economics of rice fallow maize under different levels of nitrogen and phosphorus given to preceding kharif rice and different fertilizer schedules applied to succeeding maize crop]. Crop Res. 46(1, 2 & 3): 1-5 (2013). Department of Agronomy Agricultural College, Bapatla-522 101 (Andhra Pradesh), India

ABSTRACT

The trial on rice (Oryza sativa L.) fallow maize (Zea mays L.) under zero till conditions was conducted during 2008-09 and 2009-10 at Agricultural College Farm, Bapatla on sandy clay loam soil to study the yield and nutrient uptake of kharif rice as influenced by different levels of nitrogen, phosphorus applied to rice and fertilizer schedules given to maize during rabi. The treatments consisted of four nitrogen levels i. e. 80 kg N/ha, 120 kg N/ha, 240 kg N/ha, green manuring @ 5 t/ha; three phosphorus levels i. e. 0, 30 and 60 kg P2O5/ha to preceding rice and three fertilizer schedules i. e. 0, 50 and 100% recommended dose of fertilizers (RDF) to succeeding maize. Application of 240 kg N/ha in combination with 60 kg P2O5/ha and 100% RDF to maize significantly increased the grain yield, straw yield and economics (monetary returns) of rice as well as 100% RDF to maize over other levels of nitrogen, phosphorus and fertilizer schedules.

2. Suchi Gangwar and Megha Dubey [Impact of organic nutrient management practices on quality of Basmati rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Crop Res. 46(1, 2 & 3): 6-10 (2013). Department of Agronomy Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Visvavidyalaya, Jabalpur-482 004 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A long term field experiment was conducted at the Research Farm of JNKVV, Jabalpur during 2010-11 and 2011-12. The soil of the experimental site was sandy clay loam (Sand = 52.10%, Silt = 22.21% and Clay = 21.69%) having pH of 7.4 and EC 0.40 dS/m in the top 15 cm soil. The available N, P2O5 and K2O were 246, 12.6 and 296 kg/ha, respectively. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with three replications and 10 treatments. The present study was carried out to find out the effect of different combinations of organic manures and biofertilizers on grain quality of rice in organic farming. The emerging scenario necessitates the need of adaptation of the practices which maintain the soil health and keep the production system more sustainable without adverse effect on the natural resources and the environment. Combination of BGA with FYM, VC and neem cake result was still better than other treatments. Application of organic manure is the key for success of organic farming. Role of biofertilizers for enhancing the productivity of soil either by fixing atmospheric nitrogen or by solubilizing soil phosphorus or by stimulating plant growth through synthesis of growth promoting substances is well known and has special importance in organic farming.

3. G. N. Naveen, L. Krishna Naik, B. L. Raghunandan*, M. Divya and J. Hitendra [Influence of organics and microbial inoculants on growth and nutrient uptake by aerobic rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 11-15 (2013). Department of Agricultural Microbiology University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India *(e-mail : raghumic2@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2010 at Zonal Agricultural Research Station, V. C. Farm, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore to assess the effect of organics and microbial inoculants on growth of aerobic rice. Application of recommended NPK+Azospirillum brasilense+Bacillus megaterium+ Vermicompost was found better in improving the plant growth parameters viz., plant height (74.31 cm), number of tillers/hill (32.2) and total dry matter production (87.09 g/hill). Maximum uptake of nutrients by the crop was recorded as total nitrogen (78.06 kg/ha), total phosphorus (15.28 kg/ha) and total potassium (101.67 kg/ha) with the supplementation of organics and microbial inoculants to the recommended dosage of inorganic nutrients.

4. NIDHI VERMA, S. K. VISHWAKARMA, DEEPAK SHRIVASTAVA AND M. S. SHAH [Studies on weed flora and weed control efficiency under diversification and intensification of rice-based cropping systems]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 16-21 (2013). Department of Agronomy Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Jabalpur-482 004 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted on diversification and intensification of cropping system under irrigated production system over existing rice-wheat and rice-chickpea cropping systems during the year 2009-10 in clay loam soils of Jabalpur (M. P.). In kharif, different rice varieties were grown under various crop sequences and the lowest weed biomass was recorded in rice-potato-maize cob+fodder (3.98 q/ha) cropped sequences and highest weed biomass was recorded in rice-potato-groundnut (5.60 q/ha) under among different crop sequences grown. During rabi season, the weed intensity was minimum (94.4 to 95.4/m2) in onion and garlic crop grown under two different crop sequences, hence, the lowest weed biomass (1.24 to 2.07 q/ha) was recorded in onion and garlic fields. Both gobhi sarson crops faced almost similar kind of weed infestation, which were higher as compared to potato, hence, these resulted in production of higher weed biomass (4.84 to 5.29 q/ha). During summer season, the weed intensity was maximum (118.0 weeds/m2) in greengram field, which resulted in the highest weed biomass production (3.89 q/ha). The weed biomass was minimum (3.22 q/ha) in sesame associated fields due to the lowest weed density (97.8 weeds/m2). Other summer season crops viz., groundnut, maize, okra and greengram produced the weed biomass. In kharif, different rice varieties were grown under various crop sequences and the highest weed control efficiency was recorded in rice-potato-maize cob+fodder (29.9%) cropped sequences. During rabi season, the weed control efficiency was highest (50.0 to 70.6%) in onion, garlic and at potato crop grown under three different crop sequences, hence, the lowest weed control efficiency was recorded in gabhi sarson and chickpea 2.36 and 6.14%, respectively. In summer season, the weed control efficiency was lowest (1.02%) in maize field which resulted in the highest weed biomass production (3.85 q/ha). The weed biomass was lowest (3.22 q/ha) in sesame fields due to the highest weed control efficiency (17.2%).

5. Pushparani Senjam, B. K. Senapati and Saugat Chettri [Character association and path coefficient analysis in some recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Basmati derivatives (Oryza sativa L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 22-27 (2013). Department of Plant Breeding Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur-741 252, Nadia (West Bengal), India

ABSTRACT

The present study was undertaken to determine inter-relationship between 16 yield and its component characters and their direct and indirect effects on grain yield in RILs of Basmati derivatives. The study evaluated 31 RILs of Basmati derivatives, along with a check variety, under New Alluvial Zone of West Bengal, India, during kharif 2011. Correlation studies revealed that grain yield per plant was positive and significantly correlated with fertility (%) and panicle weight. Therefore, these two characters should be considered during selection of rice genotypes. Path coefficient analysis revealed that eight characters viz., panicle numbers per plant, panicle length, panicle weight, secondary branches per panicle, chaffy number per panicle, fertility (%), grain L/B ratio and kernel length had positive direct effect on grain yield. Yield correlations for panicle weight and fertility (%) were significantly positive and had high positive direct effect, therefore, direct selection against these traits would be effective for yield improvement in rice.

6. Chandan Kapoor*, R. Gopi and A. Pattanayak [Genetic parameters and disease reaction of some upland paddy lines evaluated under Sikkim midhills]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 28-31 (2013). ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Sikkim Centre, Tadong, Gangtok, India *(e-mail : chandannaarm@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Seventeen lines of upland paddy were evaluated for estimating genetic parameters, correlation coefficient and reaction against brown spot disease. The lines exhibited considerable variation for seven traits out of nine characters studied. Mean yield/plant was highest in Bhalum-3 (29.26 g) followed by RCPL-412 (28.46 g) and Bhalum-2 (28.06 g). Entries RCPL-412 and RCPL-413 exhibited highest number of grains/panicle(188.0 and 165.44, respectively). Narrow differences were observed between PCV and GCV for majority of the traits. Yield per plant was significantly correlated with number of productive tillers per plant (0.4280), number of grains per panicle (0.4085) and negatively correlated with days to 75% maturity (-0.5949). Lines Bhalum 1, 2, 3, 4 and RCPL 412 and 413 showed resistant reaction against brown spot disease of rice.

7. BSaikat Das and Biplab Mitra [Performance of wheat genotypes under late and very late sowing in sub-Himalayan plains of West Bengal]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 32-35 (2013). AICW & BIP, Coochbehar Krishi Vigyan Kendra Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Pundibari, Coochbehar-736 165 (West Bengal), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out during the rabi season of 2009-10 in sub-Himalayan plains of West Bengal to evaluate the performance of some advanced wheat genotypes under late sown (December 23) and very late sown (January 05) condition. The experiment was laid out in split-plot design with nine genotypes, randomly allotted to main-plots; while two dates of sowing were allocated randomly to sub-plots. The study revealed that all the genotypes exhibited higher biomass production under late sown condition than very late sown condition. All the genotypes taken in the experiment matured within 100-105 days under very late sowing condition signifying that the genotypes took 5-13 days less time for maturity. Yield advantage was recorded up to 23.13% in late sowing over very late sowing. Delay in sowing from mid- December to first week of January resulted in significant decrease in major yield attributing characters viz., number of earheads/sq. m as well as number of grains/spike. Amongst the genotypes, maximum yield was achieved in DBW 14 (36.84 q/ha), closely followed by HI 1563 (34.98 q/ha). Both the varieties could be treated as suitable genotypes having somewhat tolerance towards heat stress under this condition.

8. PANKAJ GARG, R. P. SAHARAN AND O. P. BISHNOI [Genetic variability for yield and its component traits under normal and drought conditions in wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.) em. Thell.]]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 36-38 (2013). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India

ABSTRACT

Genetic variability for yield and its component traits was studied in eight parents and their 28 F1s of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under normal and drought conditions. Both phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation were found to be moderate for effective tillers/plant and biomass/plant under drought only, while coleoptile length and grain yield/plant under normal and drought conditions. Hence, direct selection of these traits will prove effective. Effective tillers/plant had moderate PCV and GCV coupled with moderate heritability. High heritability coupled with high genetic advance for grains/spike, biomass/plant and coleoptile length indicated the influence of additive gene action and consequently a likelihood of high genetic gain from phenotypic selection.

9. I. USHA RANI, G. PADMAJA AND P. CHANDRASEKHAR RAO [Integrated effect of organic manures and inorganic fertilizers on soil dehydrogenase enzyme activity and yield of maize-spinach cropping system]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 39-43 (2013). Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted on a sandy loam soil during rabi (maize) and summer (spinach) seasons of 2009-10 with a view to study the effect of organic manures, inorganic fertilizers and their integration on soil dehydrogenase activity and yield of maize-spinach cropping system. Among the different combinations application of 75% RDF+25% through vermicompost recorded significantly highest grain and stover yield (52.38 and 60.77 q/ha) at harvest but on par with 75% RDF+25% through poultry manure and 75% RDF+25% through FYM. The spinach crop grown during summer responded favourably to the residual and cumulative treatments and the highest fresh leaf yield (14.68 and 12.37 t/ha) was recorded in cumulative and residual treatments. The soil dehydrogenase enzyme activity at different growth stages of maize and at final harvest of spinach revealed that there was increase in enzyme activities up to active growth stages of crops and later showed a decrease. Significantly highest dehydrogenase activity was found in treatment T4 (100% VC) with a value (163.7), tasseling (180.3) and harvesting stage (136.9) µg of TPF produced/g soil/day at vegetative, tasseling and at harvesting stages of maize, which was on par with T8 and T11 and was significantly different from other treatments in maize crop. The cumulative and residual effects of spinach revealed that the dehydrogenase activity was higher in cumulative treatments than residual treatments.

10. A. S. Charak, Manpreet Kour, Anil Khokhar and A. K. Razdhan [Productivity, profitability, energetics and nutrient use efficiency of maize (Zea mays L.) cultivars at different fertility levels under rainfed conditions in temperate zone of Jammu and Kashmir]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 44-47 (2013). SKUAS&T–J Krishi Vigyan Kendra Bhaderwah, Doda-182 221 (J & K), India

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted at the experimental farm, Sartangal of Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Bhaderwah, Doda in the temperate Agro-climatic Zone of Jammu and Kashmir to evaluate six maize varieties viz., V1 : local variety, V2 : UDMH-3, V3 : UDMC-3, V4 : UDMC-4, V5 : UDMC-1 and V6 : C-8 along with four fertility levels viz., F1 : Control, F2 : 75% of RDF (60 : 40 : 20 kg NPK/ha), F3 : 100% of RDF (60 : 40 : 20 kg NPK/ha) and F4 : 125% of RDF for productivity, profitability, energetics and nutrient use efficiency under rainfed conditions. The experiment was conducted in factorial randomized block design, replicated thrice with 24 treatment combinations. The hybrid variety UDMH-3 matured 12 days earlier and increased the grain yield by 32.2% and benefit : cost ratio by 53.2% over local variety. It was also highly energy efficient with energy output : input ratio of 20.15% and energy productivity of 0.50 kg M/J. The inclusion of improved variety UDMH-3 also increased agronomic efficiency over local variety with a range of 1.65 to 14.08 kg/kg N, 1.81 to 15,34 kg/kg P and 5.03 to 42.69 kg/kg K and partial factor productivity (PFP) from 38.54 to 50.97 kg/kg N, 42.02 to 55.55 kg/kg P and 116.87 to 154.53 kg/kg K. Among fertility levels, maize grain yield increased significantly by increasing fertilizer dose to 100% RDF (60 : 40 : 20 kg NPK/ha) (47.83 q/ha) as compared to maize crop receiving no fertilizer input (35.79 q/ha) and 75% RDF. The benefit : cost ratio was highest at 125% RDF with net returns of Rs. 40782/ha closely followed by 755 RDF with B : C ratio of 2.19 and net returns of Rs. 39539/ha. Again highest agronomic efficiency of 12.54 kg of grain/kg of N, 13.53 kg of grain/kg of P and 37.63 kg of grain/kg of K was obtained with 100% RDF. However, 75% RDF was highly energy and nutrient efficient on the basis of partial factor productivity as compared to other fertility levels.

11. P. LATHA, P. THANGAVEL, G. RAJANNAN AND K. ARULMOZHISELVAN [Performance of multicut fodder sorghum as influenced by distillery industrial byproducts]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 48-54 (2013). Department of Environmental Sciences Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

Distillery spentwash is a nutrient rich liquid organic waste obtained from molasses based distillery industries after biomethanation process and it is the carrier of huge amounts of nutrients and organic matter. A field experiment was conducted during 2009-10 at Research and Development Farm, M/s. Bannari Amman Sugars Distillery Division Ltd., Ealur, Erode to assess the performance of multicut fodder sorghum by utilizing distillery industry byproducts viz., distillery spentwash, biocompost and spentwash ash. Treatments involved were distillery spentwash @ 37.5 and 50 kilo l/ha at full and split dose, biocompost @ 5.0 t/ha and spentwash ash @ 400 kg/ha with recommended dose of fertilizers and the various parameters were assessed at 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th harvests. Results of the field experiment revealed that the application of distillery spentwash @ 37.5 kilo l/ha at full dose with recommended dose of nitrogen and phosphorus increased the growth, quality and nutrient parameters over recommended dose of fertilizers.

12. S. LATA, S. K. GULERIA, UTTAM CHANDEL, G. KATNA, AKHILESH SINGH, PANKAJ SOOD, ANJU PATHANIA AND KALPNA THAKUR [Stability analysis and adaptability of maize hybrids (Zea mays L.) across environments in Himachal Pradesh]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 55-62 (2013). Department of Crop Improvement CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Thirty maize hybrids were tested in randomized complete block design with three replications to study genotype x environment (G x E) interactions and stability for yield and related traits across six locations (400-1290 m a. m. s. l.) in Himachal Pradesh. Combined analysis of variance across locations showed highly significant differences among locations, genotypes and their interactions for all the traits studied. Significant G x E interactions for all the traits depicted that these traits were important determinants of G x E for yield in specific area. Among six locations, Hi Shell (91.44 q/ha) ranked first followed by DKC 7074 (91.25 q/ha), 900 M Gold (89.74 q/ha) and VMH 4102 (89.38 q/ha). Hybrid Hi Shell was highest yielding followed by hybrid DKC 7074, while lowest yield was observed for hybrid VMH 4106. For phenological traits, plant height and grain yield, almost all hybrids exhibited significant deviation mean square (S2di) indicating that it was difficult to predict the performance of hybrids on the basis of these traits. For cob placement height and 100-seed weight deviation mean square was non-significant, hence, stability in performance was evident for majority of hybrids with respect to these traits. The hybrids exhibited specific adaptability across the state. Some hybrids had relatively good performance in one location, whereas others showed good performance indicating the possibility to develop specific hybrids for specific location.

13. ANIL KUMAR SHUKLA, R. D. SHARMA, SURENDRA SINGH RAJPUT, GAURA PANDEY AND G. S. MARKO [Effect of foliar and basal nourishment on chlorophyll content, yield, quality and economics of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 63-65 (2013). Department of Botany Government P. G. College, Satna-485 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during winter seasons of 2009-10 and 2010-11 to study the effect of foliar and basal nourishment on the yield and economics of chickpea. Amongst the foliar spray nutrients, DAP (2%) and N20P50K20S20 as basal, when applied separately or in combination, resulted in highest growth parameters, chlorophyll content, grain yield, grain protein and net income from the rainfed chickpea cv. JG 315. Thus, the combined input of DAP (2%) x N20P50K20S20 gave maximum grain yield of 17.23 q/ha, grain protein 23.13% and net income up to Rs. 51,201/ha. The net income was higher by Rs. 32457/ha over the absolute control.

14. ANIL KUMAR SHUKLA, R. D. SHARMA, SURENDRA SINGH RAJPUT, GAURA PANDEY AND G. S. MARKO [Effect of foliar and basal nourishment on nutrient contents and uptake of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 66-69 (2013). Department of Botany Government P. G. College, Satna-485 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during winter seasons of 2009-10 and 2010-11 to study the effect of foliar and basal nourishment on nutrient contents and uptake of chickpea. The nutrient contents in grain and straw viz., N, P and K deviated significantly due to foliar spray and basal application of fertilizers. The treatment interactions were found to be significant only in case of P and K contents in grain and straw. Amongst the foliar spray treatments, DAP (2%) enhanced the N and P contents in grain and straw as well as their uptake significantly. Similarly, basal application of N20P50K20S20 increased all these parameters significantly over the control. When both these foliar and basal application of nutrients were combined, the NPK nutrient contents and their uptake of chickpea were further enhanced synergistically.

15. I. A. Chaudhari, D. M. Patel, G. N. Patel and S. M. Patel [Effect of various organic sources of nutrients on growth and yield of summer greengram [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek]]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 70-73 (2013). Department of Agronomy S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar-385 506, Banaskantha (Gujarat), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out to test the effect of various organic sources of nutrients on growth and yield of summer greengram during summer 2011 at Agronomy Instructional Farm, Chimanbhai Patel College of Agriculture, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar on loamy sand soil. Among the different organic sources, combined use of vermicompost+soil application of panchagavya at 15 and 30 DAS improved all yield attributes as well as recorded significantly higher seed yield over either sole application or conjuctive use of different organic sources in summer greengram except application of RDN through FYM + soil application of panchagavya at 15 and 30 DAS and RDF. It also improved seed yield to the tune of 18.43% over control (RDF). Soil health was improved with respect to drastic increase in microbial population as well as improvement in available nitrogen in the soil after harvest of crop by it over use of inorganic fertilizers alone i. e. RDF.

16. Veena, Yashoda R. Hegde*, Ganajaxi Math and A. G. Vijay Kumar [Bioefficacy of fungicides against Cercospora canescens causing leaf spot of greengram]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 74-78 (2013). Department of Plant Pathology University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580 005 (Karnataka), India (e-mail : uasyashoda@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Leaf spot of greengram caused by Cercospora canescens is an important disease in greengram. In vitro and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of different fungicides against this disease. In laboratory, five systemic fungicides, five contact fungicides and one combi-product were assayed against C. canescens by poisoned food technique. Hexaconazole @ 0.05% and combi-product, carbendazim+mancozeb @ 0.025% recorded complete inhibition of mycelial growth of the pathogen. In field experiment, spraying of hexaconazole recorded minimum disease with maximum yield and was followed by difenconazole. Results indicated that hexaconazole was very effective in managing leaf spot of greengram.

17. B. K. MEENA, U. K. HULIHALLI AND H. K. SUMERIYA [Effect of fertility levels and planting geometry on growth and yield of medium duration pigeonpea hybrid ICPH-2671]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 79-83 (2013). Department of Agronomy University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580 005 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2009 at Main Agricultural Research Station, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad to study the response of hybrid pigeonpea to planting geometry and fertility levels. The experiment was laid out in a factorial RBD with three replications. The experiment consisted of nine treatment combinations of hybrid pigeonpea (ICPH-2671) with two factors, three planting geometries (S1–60 x 30 cm, S2–90 x 30 cm and S3–90 x 45 cm) and three fertility levels (F1–25 : 50, F2–37.5 : 75 and F3–50 : 100 N, P kg/ha) and pigeonpea variety Maruti (ICP-8863) with recommended package of practices as control plot. The results revealed that the hybrid pigeonpea ICPH-2671 recorded significantly higher grain yield (24.04 q/ha) as compared to cv. Maruti (16.79 q/ha) and the magnitude of increase was 41.7% higher. The yield parameters like grain weight/plant, number of pods/plant and growth parameters like number of primary and secondary branches/plant, LAI and dry matter production and its distribution were higher with hybrid pigeonpea ICPH-2671 compared to variety Maruti. Significant differences were observed among the plant geometry and fertility levels and their interactions with respect to growth and yield parameters. The plant geometry of 90 x 45 cm recorded significantly higher grain yield (25.65 q/ha) as compared to closer geometry of 60 x 30 cm (21.88 q/ha). The fertility levels of 50 : 100 N, P kg/ha resulted in significantly higher grain yield (25.74 q/ha) as compared to lower fertility levels of 25 : 50 N, P kg/ha (22.28 q/ha). Among the treatment combinations, S2F3 (90 x 45 cm+50 : 100 N, P kg/ha) recorded significantly higher grain yield (28.49 q/ha) and it was 42.8% higher than the control (16.79 q/ha). The growth and yield parameters followed the similar trend. The study indicated that hybrid pigeonpea ICPH-2671 had better response to wider geometry and higher fertility levels. It performed better than the cv. Maruti.

18. D. D. MANKAR* AND S. M. NAWLAKHE [Effect of land configuration and phosphate management on growth and yield of semi-rabi pigeonpea]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 84-87 (2013). Dr. P. D. K. V. College of Agriculture, Nagpur-444 001 (M. S.), India *(e-mail : drdhanrajmankar@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during the semi-rabi seasons of 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2011-12 at Agronomy Farm, College of Agriculture, Nagpur in a split plot design with four land configurations as main plot treatments viz., flat bed (FB), opening of furrow in every row, opening of furrow after two rows and opening of furrow after three rows and three phosphate managements as sub-plot treatments viz., 100% recommended phosphate (50 kg P2O5/ha), 75% recommended phosphate (37.5 kg P2O5/ ha), 75% recommended phosphate (37.5 kg P2O5/ha)+SB @ 2.5 kg/ha soil application. The soil of the experimental plot was clayey, medium high in organic carbon, low in available N and available P2O5 and very high in available K2O. Field capacity of experimental plot was 33.20% and PWP was 18.10%. Opening of furrow after every row gave higher yield, gross monetary returns and net monetary returns and higher B : C ratio over flat bed as well as over other treatments during all the three seasons and in pooled results also, but results were significant during first year only. The 100% recommended phosphate (50 kg P2O5/ha) showed significantly higher grain yield and gross monetary returns during all the three seasons of experimentation and in pooled mean also. However, during individual year 75% recommended phosphate (37.5 kg P2O5/ha) with PSB @ 2.5 kg soil application showed at par results in respect of yield, GMR and NMR with the 50 kg P2O5 application (100% recommended P2O5). The 50 kg P2O5 application (100% recommended P2O5) also recorded higher B : C ratio. The interaction effect during individual year was found to be non-significant, but in pooled results 100% recommended phosphate (50 kg P2O5/ha) with opening of furrow in every row recorded maximum and significantly higher pigeonpea yield over rest of the treatments and 27.3% more yield over flat bed+100% RDF. The GMR and NMR were also significantly higher in the same treatment combination.

19. A. K. GUGGARI AND M. B. PATIL [Performance of different maturity pigeonpea varieties in pearl millet+ pigeonpea (2 : 1) intercropping system in Northern Dry Zone of Karnataka]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 88-93 (2013). AICRP on Pearl Millet, Regional Agricultural Research Station, Bijapur-586 101 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted on medium black soil at Regional Agricultural Research Station, Bijapur (Karnataka) for three rainy seasons from 2009 to 2011 to study the performance of different maturity pigeonpea varieties in pearl millet+pigeonpea (2 : 1) intercropping system. There were 11 treatments consisting of six intercropping treatments of pearl millet+pigeonpea in 2 : 1 row proportion involving two pearl millet genotypes (GHB-558-hybrid and ICMV-221 a composite variety) and three pigeonpea varieties of different maturity viz., Gullal local (short duration), TS-3R (medium duration) and Asha (long duration). In addition, there were five treatments involving two sole crops of pearl millet and three sole crops of pigeonpea. The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design with three replications. Mean results of three years (2009, 2010 and 2011) showed that GHB-558 pearl millet hybrid intercropped with medium duration pigeonpea variety TS-3R gave significantly higher grain yield (2452 kg/ha) compared to other treatments, however, it was at par with sole crops of GHB-558 pearl millet hybrid (2402 kg/ha)and ICMV-221 variety (2293 kg/ha). Pigeonpea grain yield decreased significantly due to pearl millet intercropping irrespective of genotypes. Sole crops of medium duration TS-3R and short duration Gullal local pigeonpea varieties were at par recorded significantly higher grain yields (2301 kg/ha each) compared to sole crop of long duration variety Asha (1765 kg/ha) and other treatments in intercropping system. However, sole crop of long duration Asha pigeonpea variety was at par with medium duration TS-3R pigeonpea variety intercropped with GHB-558 pearl millet hybrid (1577 kg/ha), but it was significantly superior to other pigeonpea genotypes intercropped either with GHB-558 pearl millet hybrid or ICMV-221 variety. Pearl millet grain equivalent yield was significantly higher with sole crop of short duration pigeonpea variety Gullal local (9195 kg/ha) compared to other intercropping treatments and sole crop of long duration pigeonpea variety Asha (6974 kg/ha), however, it was at par with sole crop of medium duration pigeonpea variety TS-3R (8945 kg/ha) and the same genotype intercropped with GHB-558 pearl millet hybrid (8778 kg/ha). Net return was significantly higher with sole crop of short duration pigeonpea variety Gullal local (Rs. 52694/ha) compared to sole crop of long duration pigeonpea variety Asha (Rs. 35273/ha) and other pearl millet and pigeonpea intercropping treatments, however, it was at par with sole crop of medium duration pigeonpea variety TS-3R (Rs.52566/ha) and the same genotype intercropped with GHB-558 pearl millet hybrid (Rs.48545/ha). Benefit : cost ratio followed similar trend. Land equivalent ratio was significantly higher with medium duration pigeonpea variety TS-3R intercropped with GHB-558 pearl millet hybrid (1.71).

20. POOJA DHUPPAR, SUBHASH C. BIYAN, BASANTI CHINTAPALLI AND D. SARVESHWARA RAO [Response of lentil crop (Lens culinaris Medik.) to changing weather trends at Agra]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 94-98 (2013). Department of Botany Dayalbagh Educational Institute (Deemed University), Agra-282 110 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Indo-Gangetic plains comprising the states of Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and West Bengal became a focal point of studies for the agricultural vulnerability to climate change. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is one of the important winter pulse crops after chickpea in India. The major abiotic stress affecting lentil crop is cold, drought, heat salinity, nutrient deficiency and nutrient toxicity. A micro-level location specific study was conducted to understand the impact of weather changes on lentil crop production at Agra. The average maximum (26.1ºC) and minimum temperature (10.4ºC) at cropping period (October-March) for the three years (2001-03) was considered as a base line for the purpose of analysis of 10 years’ weather data. The deficit of rainfall (25.7 mm) along with increase in maximum and minimum temperature by 0.4º and 0.6ºC resulted in considerable abiotic stress on lentil crop production. Flower drop/pod drop in lentil increased during the observation period and abiotic stress may be the major cause of concern for lowering of yield. The estimated yield losses may be as follows (a) deficit in 10 mm rainfall can result in yield loss of 60.6 kg/ha, and (b) increase in maximum and minimum temperature by 0.1ºC can result in yield loss of 38.9 and 25.9 kg/ha, respectively. Similarly, a separate attempt was made to understand the probable impact of annual weather changes on the yield of lentil crop at Agra.

21. JAGJOT SINGH GILL* [Yield, protein and nutrient uptake in grain as influenced by sowing dates and tillage systems in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 99-101 (2013). Department of Agronomy Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141 004 (Punjab), India *(e-mail : jagjotsinghgill@yahoo.co.in)

ABSTRACT

An experiment was carried out during rabi season of 2007-08 at Khalsa College Research Farm, Amritsar (Punjab) to study the effect of different sowing dates and tillage methods on productivity of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.). Sowing dates for lentil were 15 October (D1), 30 October (D2), 14 November (D3) and 30 November (D4). Methods of tillage were no tillage (NT) : without ploughing, minimum tillage (MT) : one ploughing and conventional tillage (CT) : three ploughings. Sowing on 30th October was found to increase the yield, protein content, N, P and K uptake in grains of lentil. Tillage also had significant influence on yield and nutrient uptake. The highest yield, protein content, N, P and K uptake were recorded with the treatment that received conventional tillage : three ploughings.

22. G. SRIDEVI and C. A. Srinivasamurthy [Studies on the effect of farm yard manure, cattle and human urine on soil properties, growth and yield of clusterbean crop]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 102-108 (2013). Department of Soil Sciences and Agricultural Chemistry University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted to study the effect of human urine, cattle urine, FYM and fertilizers on clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.) crop yield and soil properties. The clusterbean variety used in this trial was Pusa Sadhahar. The experimental design was a randomized complete block comprising 10 plots with three replicates. Yield components number of clusters per plant, number of pods per plant and fresh clusterbean pod yield were determined. Soil samples were taken randomly from depths of 0-15 cm before sowing of seeds. The results of the field experiment revealed that 40% recommended dose of nitrogen through FYM basal+ 60% through human urine increased the fresh pod (6.88 t/ha) of clusterbean when compared to control and other treatments.

23. H. B. Patel, G. N. Patel, Shaukat Ali, D. M. Patel and N. H. Patel [Effect of integrated weed management on growth, yield and weed parameters in mustard]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 109-114 (2013). Department of Agronomy S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar-385 506 (Gujarat), India

ABSTRACT

A An experiment was conducted at Agronomy Instructional Farm, Chimanbhai Patel College of Agriculture, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar (Gujarat) to integrated weed management studies in mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern and Coss. ex Coss. during rabi season of 2011-12. The experiment comprising 12 treatments viz., weedy check, interculturing+1 HW at 25 DAS, pendimethalin @ 0.5 and 0.75 kg/ha PE alone and along with HW at 25 DAS with each level, oxadiargyl @ 75 and 90 g/ha PE alone and along with HW at 25 DAS with each level, oxyfluorfen @ 100 g/ha as PE and weed free was conducted in a randomized block design with three replications. The results of the experiment indicated that higher values of plant growth characters viz., dry matter production per plant (51.00 g) and yield attributing characters viz., number of siliquae per plant (280.37), number of seeds per siliqua (14.70) and test weight (4.25 g) were recorded under weed free treatment. Pendimethalin @ 0.5 kg/ha PE+1 HW at 25 DAS, oxadiargyl @ 75 g/ha PE+1 HW at 25 DAS and pendimethalin @ 0.5 kg/ha PE were found equally effective in respect to these characters which were significantly higher than rest of the treatments. Among the treatments, weed free treatment recorded significantly higher seed yield (1738 kg/ha), stover yield (4937 kg/ha) and harvest index (26.03%) of mustard than rest of the treatments. Among the treatments tried in this experiment, pendimethalin @ 0.5 kg/ha PE+1 HW at 25 DAS was found the best treatment by recording maximum net realization (Rs. 46,277/ha) and benefit : cost ratio (3.55). Besides weed free condition, pendimethalin @ 0.5 kg/ha PE+1 HW at 25 DAS was found more effective in reducing the total weed population resulting in less dry weight of weeds (147.67 kg/ha). Oxadiargyl @ 75 g/ha PE+1 HW at 25 DAS was found equally effective with this respect.

24. S. R. RUNDALA, B. L. KUMAWAT, G. L. CHOUDHARY, K. PRAJAPAT AND SITA KUMAWAT [Performance of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) under integrated nutrient management]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 115-118 (2013). Department of Agronomy S. K. N. College of Agriculture (SKRAU, Bikaner), Jobner-303 329 (Rajasthan), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted on loamy sand soil during rabi 2009-10 to find out the effect of integrated nutrient management on performance of Indian mustard. Results revealed that different fertility levels had significant effect on all the growth parameters (plant height and dry matter accumulation per plant), yield attributes (number of branches per plant, siliquae per plant, seeds per siliqua and test weight), yield (seed and stover) and net returns of mustard. The maximum values of these parameters were recorded under application of 75% RDF through FYM+25% through fertilizers being at par with 50% RDF through FYM+50% through fertilizers except stover yield which was at par with 100% RDF through FYM significantly superior to rest of the treatments. Results further indicated that dual inoculation with Azotobacter+PSB significantly increased plant height, dry matter accumulation per plant, number of branches per plant, siliquae per plant, seeds per siliqua, test weight, seed and stover yield and net returns over control.

25. K. Jana*, G. K. Mallick and S. Ghosh [Performance of different linseed varieties in ‘paira’ cropping system]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 119-121 (2013). Rice Research Station, Bankura-722 101 (West Bengal), India *(e-mail : kjanarrs@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rabi seasons of 2010-11 and 2011-12 to study the performance of different linseed varieties in ‘paira’ cropping system under red and laterite zone of West Bengal at Rice Research Station, Bankura, West Bengal, India. The soil of experimental field was sandy loam in texture with medium in fertility status. This experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. It was revealed from the experimental results that among different linseed varieties, T-397 yielded highest seed yield (562.43, 578.66 and 570.56 kg/ha during rabi seasons of 2010-11, 2011-12 and pooled value, respectively) in ‘utera’ or ‘paira’ system of cropping under red and laterite zone of West Bengal through proper utilization of stored soil moisture and residual fertility status in the soil. The lowest seed yield (315.78, 337.56 and 326.65 kg/ha during rabi seasons of 2010-11, 2011-12 and pooled value, respectively) was recorded from Garima variety. No pests and diseases were observed during both the years of experimentation.

26. V. Thirumala Rao, D. Bharathi, Y. Chandra Mohan, V. Venkanna and D. Bhadru [Genetic variability and association analysis in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 122-125 (2013). ANGRAU Regional Agricultural Research Station Jagtial, Polasa-505 529, Karimnagar (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Genetic variability, character association and path analysis between yield and its contributing traits were studied in 48 sesame genotypes. Analysis of variance revealed the existence of significant differences among genotypes for all the characters studied. High heritability coupled with high genetic advance as per cent of mean was observed for number of capsules per plant, plant height and seed yield indicating the role of additive gene in expressing these traits. Seed yield was significant positively correlated with capsule length, test weight, number of capsules per plant, number of branches per plant and days to 50% flowering. Path coefficient analysis indicated that number of capsules per plant and test weight were important traits to be considered for realizing the improvement in yield.

27. K. Sridhar, M. Yakadri, J. V. N. S. Prasad, T. Ramesh and S. R. Mulla [Physico-chemical properties of soil after harvest of rabi sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) as influenced by tillage practices and nitrogen management]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 126-129 (2013). College of Agriculture, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rabi 2011 at Research Farm, RARS, Bijapur on a deep black soil under rainfed condition with an objective to study the effect of different tillage practices imposed during kharif and nitrogen management on physical and chemical properties of soil after harvest of rabi sunflower. Soil properties like organic carbon, pH, electrical conductivity, available NPK and bulk density were not significantly influenced by tillage practices. Soil moisture content was significantly higher with minimum tillage than conventional tillage. Among nitrogen management practices, significantly higher soil organic carbon was seen with sunnhemp incorporation @ 2.5 t/ha+50% RDN through fertilizer (N2) than farmer’s practice (N4 ) but was at par with rest of the treatments. Soil pH, EC, available phosphorus and bulk density were not influenced due to nitrogen management. Significantly higher available nitrogen was seen with sunnhemp green manure incorporation @ 5 t biomass/ha (N1) over 100% RDF through fertilizer (N3) and farmers’ practice (N4) but was at par with rest of the treatments. Significantly higher available potassium was seen with 100% RDF through fertilizer (N3) than (N4) and (N5) but was at par with rest of the treatments. Significantly higher soil moisture content after harvest of sunflower was recorded with sunnhemp incorporation @ 2.5 t/ha+50% RDN through urea (N2) over 100% RDF through fertilizer (N3) but was at par with rest of the treatments.

28. Rohit Nain, S. S. DAshad* and S. P. Singh [Bio-efficacy of newer insecticides against head borer, Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) infesting sunflower]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 130-132 (2013). CCSHAU Regional Research Station, Bawal, District Rewari-123 501 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : ssdashad@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during spring 2008 to evaluate the efficacy of some new insecticides in the management of head borer, Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner) on sunflower crop. The results revealed that maximum larval mortality (84.81%) and maximum yield (3294 kg/ha) were obtained with the treatment spinosad, which was at par with endosulfan (82.28% and 3255 kg/ha, respectively) and followed by quinalphos (72.93% and 3147 kg/ha, respectively). Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt.) brand Kurstaki and cypermethrin failed to give an appreciable control. Endosulfan treatment provided maximum (1 : 21.3) cost : benefit ratio followed by quinalphos (1 : 15.8).

29. THAKAR SINGH AND AMRIK SINGH [Crop phenology of canola (Brassica napus L.) varieties as influenced by age of nursery and inter-row spacing under late sown conditions]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 133-136 (2013). Department of Agronomy Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141 004 (Punjab), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana to study the influence of nursery age and inter-row spacing on crop phenology of canola (Brassica napus L.) varieties under late sown conditions. In variety GSC-6, flowering occurred in 45 and 60 days old nursery during nursery raising which showed that 45 and 60 days old nursery was not suitable for transplanting of this variety. Hyola PAC 401 transplanted with 60 days nursery took 11.7 to 12.7 days for 50% flowering, whereas GSL-1 took 56.7 to 57.7 days. Irrespective of varieties, the crop transplanted with 30, 45, 60 days nursery and direct seeded crop took 59.6 to 61.1, 44.6 to 45.8, 22.8 to 23.4 and 80.9 to 81.8 days for 50% flowering, respectively. Hyola PAC 401 and GSL-1 transplanted with 60 days nursery took 20 and 67.3 to 68.7 days, respectively, for 50% siliquae formation, irrespective of spacings. Direct seeded crop took significantly more number of days for siliquae formation (88.6 to 89.8 days) as compared to transplanted crop (29.1 to 70.1 days). Crop maturity was found to be enhanced significantly with higher age of nursery seedlings. The crop transplanted with 60 days nursery took least number of days to mature (114.4 to 114.8 days) followed by 30 days old seedling (118.7 to 119.2 days), 45 days old seedling (122.8 to 123.0 days) and direct seeded crop (125.0 to 125.1 days).

30. N. K. Nagar, B. N. Patel and B. B. Patel [Influence of resting period and pre-sowing treatment on seed nut germination and growth of coconut seedling cv. D x T]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 137-141 (2013). Department of Fruit Science Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari-396 450 (Gujarat), India

ABSTRACT

The present experiment was conducted at R. H. R. S., Navsari (Gujarat) during 2010-11. Treatments comprised three resting periods and four pre-sowing treatments with 12 treatment combinations. Fifteen days rest after harvesting (R2) was found better with respect to earliness in germination with higher percentage of germination and growth with maximum height of seedling and number of leaves. Whereas in per-sowing treatment, seed nut soaked in water for 15 days with punching was superior in early germination and growth of seedling.

31. S. D. Jarande, B. N. Patel, B. B. Patel, N. R. Patel and H. D. Dhuda [Effect of sucrose and nutrient elements on fruit set and fruit yield of mango cv. Kesar]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 142-145 (2013). Department of Fruit Science Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari-396 450 (Gujarat), India

ABSTRACT

A field study on mango (cv. Kesar) was conducted at Agriculture Experimental Station, Navsari Agricultural University, Paria, Gujarat during the year 2009-10 under South Gujarat tropical conditions. The objective of this investigation was to increase the fruit set and fruit yield through the different nutrient elements. The present experiment was laid out in randomized block design (RBD) with 10 treatment combinations in three replications and selected mango trees were about 10 years old. Results revealed that integrated effect of nutrients on trees was found significant on fruit setting and fruit yield. Higher fruit setting at pea (19.93/panicle) and marble stage (6.50/panicle) as well as higher value of fruit set was obtained with treatment sucrose 10% + boric acid 0.5% (T8), followed by sucrose 5% + boric acid 0.5% (T5). The fruit retention at harvest (1.13%) was also higher in same treatments. The maximum number of fruits (260.66/tree) and yield (87.89 kg/tree) were registered in sucrose 10%+boric acid 0.5% (T8) treatment followed by the treatment sucrose 5%+boric acid 0.5% (T5). On the basis of economics, maximum BCR was obtained in the treatment of sucrose 5%+boric acid 0.5% (T5).

32. K. A. LALITHYA, KULAPATI HIPPARAGI, G. N. THIPPESHAPPA AND VISHNUVARDHANA [Effect of silicon and micronutrients on growth and yield attributes of sapota cv. Kalipatti under hill zone]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 146-149 (2013). Department of Fruit Science College of Horticulture, Mudigere, Chikamagalur-577 132 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at College of Horticulture, Mudigere to know the effect of silicon and micronutrients on growth and yield of sapota. Silicon source like potassium silicate as foliar application was given at concentration of 6 and 8 ml per litre and calcium silicate as soil application was applied only once at concentration of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 kg per tree. Boron was applied at the concentration of 2 and 3 g per litre and micronutrients were applied at 3 and 4 ml per litre at monthly intervals. The maximum total leaf chlorophyll content (8.47 mg/g), maximum number of shoots (23.96), flowers (250.16), fruits per square metre (27.16), fruits per tree (1216.66), the highest yield per tree (124.81 kg), yield per hectare (12.48 t) and the minimum number of mummified fruits (34.00) were observed in treatment with foliar application of potassium silicate at 8 ml per litre.

33. K. A. LALITHYA, KULAPATI HIPPARAGI, G. N. THIPPESHAPPA AND VISHNUVARDHANA [Influence of silicon and micronutrients on yield and quality traits of sapota cv. Kalipatti under hill zone]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 150-152 (2013). Department of Fruit Science College of Horticulture, Mudigere, Chikamagalur-577 132 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

The field experiment was conducted at College of Horticulture, Mudigere to know the effect of silicon and micronutrients on growth and yield of sapota. Silicon source like potassium silicate as foliar application was given at concentration of 6 and 8 ml per litre, and calcium silicate as soil application was applied only once at concentration of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 kg per tree. Boron was applied at the concentration of 2 and 3 g per litre and micronutrients were applied at 3 and 4 ml per litre at monthly intervals. The highest yield per tree (124.81 kg), yield per hectare (12.48 t), fruit characters like fruit weight (99.66 g), fruit length (5.55 cm), diameter of fruit (5.85 cm), volume of fruit (102.38 ml) and quality parameters like maximum total soluble solids (25.16%), shelf life (10.90 days), and the minimum physiological loss in weight (8.91%) were observed in treatment with foliar application of potassium silicate at 8 ml per litre.

34. Sanjit Pramanik*, R. Ray and Hirak Banerjee [Performance of banana cv. Martaman (aab, Silk) under drip fertigation system in new alluvial zone of West Bengal]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 153-161 (2013). Department of Soil and Water Conservation Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur-741 252, Nadia (West Bengal), India *(e-mail : sanjit.bckv@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Field experiment was carried out at the Teaching Farm of Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, West Bengal during 2008-10. The aim of the study was to assess the growth, yield and nutrient uptake of banana [var. Martaman (AAB, Silk)] under drip fertigation method. The experiment was laid out in augmented factorial complete block design with four replications. Main factor was irrigation at three levels (I1=50% CPE, I2=60% CPE and I3=70% CPE), sub-factor was fertilizer at three levels (F1=50% RDF, F2=60% RDF and F3=80% RDF) and control was augmented in four replications. Experimental results revealed that the nitrogen content on the basis of percentage dry weight of banana leaf was highest in 70% levels of irrigation, particularly in ratoon crop than plant crop in all the stages of growth except harvesting stage. Similarly, 80% level of fertilizer contributed higher nitrogen content in different growth stages. Similar trend was also found in case of phosphorus levels. The 80% levels of fertilizer got the highest phosphorus content of leaf and 50% gave the lowest value in all the crop growth stages. The potassium content of the leaf followed the similar trend to that of nitrogen content under both irrigation and fertilizer treatments. The results indicate that the banana yield attributing characters and yield were significantly influenced by the different treatments and were superior in plants under drip fertigation compared to those under conventional irrigation. Combined application of irrigation at 60% CPE and 80% RDF yielded significantly higher 49.2 and 44.1 t/ha for plant and ratoon crop, respectively, accompanied by higher water use efficiency resulting in considerable saving of water (41.7 and 40.4% for plant crop and ratoon crop, respectively). Highest fruit yield increase over the conventional irrigation method was obtained for the plant crop (32.5%) and ratoon crop (26.4%) with the same treatment of drip fertigation.

35. Rajesh Dahiya, R. P. Narwal* and V. P. Ahlawat [Value addition in horticultural crops : Impact analysis through capacity building programmes]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 162-168 (2013). Directorate of Research CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : narwalrp@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

India has emerged as world leader in fruit and vegetable production, with a total production of 69.5 million tonnes of fruits and 140 million tonnes of vegetables. However, as per estimate more than 20-30% of total production of fruit and vegetables is lost due to spoilage at various post-harvest stages (Payal, 2011). The present studies were conducted under the Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojna Project on “Value addition in horticultural crop through capacity building of women in Fatehabad district of Haryana”. Three villages, namely, Bhuthan, Salamkhera and Dharnia were selected mainly as fruit and vegetable growing areas. Ten processed horticultural products were selected for dissemination through intervention programme. Impact studies in terms of knowledge gain, attitudinal change and skill acquisition were found 51.71%. Perceived feasibility was observed on five attributes viz., relative advantage, physical and cultural compatibility, simplicity/complexity and triability. Gain-in-knowledge was calculated for 13 parameters.

36. SAMUEL Y. C. ESSAH*, R. D. DAVIDSON AND A. HOUSER [Effect of nitrogen rate and fungicide or compost tea application on tuber yield and quality of potato cultivars]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 169-173 (2013). Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture Colorado State University, San Luis Valley Research Center 0249 East Road 9 North Center, Colorado, 81125, USA *(e-mail : sessah@lamar.colostate.edu)

ABSTRACT

The environmental impact of using chemical fungicides to suppress disease in potato production is becoming a concern in recent years. The use of compost tea as a disease suppressant is becoming popular. A study was conducted at Colorado State University, San Luis Valley Research Center, U. S. A. from 2007 to 2009, to evaluate the interactive effect of nitrogen fertilizer rate and compost tea or fungicide application on tuber yield, tuber size distribution and quality of potato cultivars Russet Norkotah and Russet Nugget. Treatment combinations included nitrogen fertilizer (N) applied at 90 and 134 kg/ha with compost tea or fungicide applied. Two control treatments were established where N was applied at 90 and 134 kg/ha with no compost tea or fungicide application. Medium size tuber yield (114-284 g tubers) increased significantly in all three years for Russet Norkotah when compost tea was applied with 90 kg N/ha (2007) or with 134 kg N/ha (2007, 2008 and 2009). Marketable size tuber yield (114-454 g tubers) of Russet Norkotah was significantly increased when compost tea was applied with 134 kg N/ha (2007 and 2009), compared to the control treatment. For Russet Nugget, medium size tuber yield increased significantly in all three years of the study when compost tea was applied with 90 kg nitrogen fertilizer/ha, compared to the control treatment. The yield of large marketable size (170-340 g and 170-454 g tubers) increased when compost tea was applied with 90 kg N/ha in two of the three years study. For Russet Norkotah, the application of fungicide increased tuber specific gravity, compared to the application of compost tea and the control treatments. However, for Russet Nugget tuber specific gravity was similar in the fungicide and compost tea treatments in two of the three years study. Results of these studies suggest that compost tea can be used with reduced or no fungicide application to produce optimum tuber yields in potato production.

37. ALEXANDRE CONGERA, M. ANJANAPPA*, K. M. Indiresh and B. SURESH KUMARA [Effect of integrated nutrient management on tuber dry matter accumulation and uptake of nutrients by potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 174-177 (2013). Department of Vegetable Science University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot, GKVK, Bengaluru-560 065 (Karnataka), India (e-mail : m_anjanappa@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Potatoes have received a reputation as being a large consumer of nutrients such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). An experiment was conducted to study the effect of integrated nutrient management on the dry matter accumulation and uptake of nutrients in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Application of 50% RDF+50% FYM+Azotobacter+Phosphobacteria (T7) recorded maximum total dry matter production (21.67%) which was at par with T3 (20.53%) and followed by T4 (19.79%), T5 (19.19%), T9 (18.55%) and T6 (18.42) during rabi 2011. Similarly, the maximum uptake of N (97.17 kg/ha), P (21.76 kg/ha) and K (159.63 kg/ha) was found with plants provided with 50% RDF+50% FYM+Azotobacter+PSB (T7) which was at par with T4, T3 and T5 during rabi 2011. The minimum dry matter accumulation (15.32%) and N (83.40 kg/ha), P (16.13 kg/ha) and K (108.23 kg/ha) were registered with 100% FYM+50% N supplied through neem cake+Azotobacter (T8).

38. Shambhu Kumar [Comparative study of seed health status in potato crop raised through tuberlets from nursery and field transplanted seedlings]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 178-181 (2013). Central Potato Research Station, Sahaynagar, Patna-801 506 (Bihar), India

ABSTRACT

Tuberlets of nine TPS populations produced from nursery bed and transplanted seedlings in the field methods were evaluated for the study of seed health status during 2010-11 and 2011-12 rabi crop. The leaf spot and viral diseases were recorded 1-7 and 1-9%, respectively, on the foliage of crop produced from seedling transplanted tuberlets. The crop from nursery bed produced tuberlets was more vigorous and almost free from diseases which could be used as healthy planting material in the eastern plains. Populations PS 6/47-1 x D-150 and PS 6/75-6 x D-150 yielded significantly higher than control 92PT-27 in both the methods among all the populations.

39. Shambhu Kumar [Screening of suitable potato lines for flowering and berry setting under low temperature (below 8°C) conditions]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 182-184 (2013). Central Potato Research Station, Sahaynagar, Patna-801 506 (Bihar), India

ABSTRACT

In the eastern plains, the temperature goes down up to 2-3°C during December and January months (when the plants attain the proper growth and flowering), hampering the flowering and berry setting in the TPS parental lines. The genotype expressing flowering and berry setting in these conditions can be useful parental material for the TPS programme. Out of 48 genotypes under study, only five genotypes, namely, KP15C2, KP15C3, KP15C4, KP15C5 and D-150 flowered and set berries with seeds after pollination. Genotype KP15C3 flowered profusely with more number of berries and seeds per plant at < 8ºC. The studies showed that TPS production could be successfully done in plains even at low temperature and sunshine hours with the use of the above selected parental lines.

40. S. J. MORE, D. R. BHANDERI, S. J. PATIL, Y. R. KADAM AND J. C. PATEL [Effect of transplanting dates and mulching on fruit characters, yield and quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cv. Gujarat Tomato-2]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 185-187 (2013). Regional Horticultural Research Station Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari (Gujarat), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted to study the effect of transplanting dates and mulching on fruit characters, yield and quality of tomato. Among the different dates of transplanting, early planting (5th November) recorded highest fruit yield and it was vice-versa in case of late transplanting date (15th December). Moreover, seedlings of Gujarat Tomato–2 mulched with black polythene (50 micron) recorded higher number of fruits (29.92), fruit weight (43.57 g), total (45.26 t/ha) and marketable fruit yield (44.21 t/ha).

41. VIJAYPAL SINGH*, A. K. BHATIA, D. DUHAN, M. MAJOKA AND AMIT SINGH [Performance of different tomato hybrids under greenhouse conditions]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2& 3) : 188-191 (2013). Department of Vegetable Science CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : vijaypal@hau.ernet.in)

ABSTRACT

A study was conducted during the rabi seasons of 2008-09 and 2009-10 at CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar to evaluate the performance of different tomato hybrids under greenhouse conditions. Nineteen tomato hybrids were planted in the greenhouse having fan and pad cooling system. The two years’ data were pooled. Maximum plant height (302.0 cm) and number of inflorescences per plant (14.4) were recorded in hybrids Yash and C-1601, respectively. Maximum number of fruits per truss (5.8) and minimum days to flowering in 50% plants (79 days) were recorded in hybrid Centurian, whereas individual fruit weight (56 g) and number of fruits per plant (62) were noticed maximum in Avinash-2 and Centurian hybrids, respectively. Early fruit yield (479.3 q/ha) was noticed maximum in hybrid Centurian, whereas total fruit yield (1287.6 q/ha) was recorded maximum in hybrid Avinash-2 followed by Richa (1278.7 q/ha).

42. U. Thapa, R. Das, A. R. Mandal and S. DebAnath [Influence of GA3 and NAA on growth, yield and quality attributing characters of sprouting broccoli [Brassica oleracea (L.) var. Italica Plenk]]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 192-195 (2013). Department of Vegetable Crops Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia-741 252 (W. B.), India

ABSTRACT

Broccoli is an important vegetable crop and has high nutritional and good commercial value. Sprouting broccoli has about 130 times more vitamin A contents than cauliflower and 22 times more than cabbage. The edible portion of broccoli, the terminal head rather loose, green in colour and the flower stalks are longer than cauliflower. A research experiment has been designed and carried out during 2009-10 and 2010-11 at Horticulture Research Station, Mondouri, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Monhanpur, Nadia, West Bengal, India to determine the effect of GA3, NAA and their combinations (applied as seedling dipping) on growth, yield and quality improvement of sprouting broccoli. The results clearly indicated significantly good response of the growth regulator applications on growth, yield and quality attributes of sprouting broccoli. GA3 30 mg/l+NAA 30 mg/l treatment (T10) showed best result with respect to head weight, head diameter, plant height, plant spread, projected yield, number of sprouts/plant and sprout weight. GA3 60 mg/l treatment (T2) took least number of days for head initiation, while GA3 80 mg/l treatment (T3) proved to be the most effective among all treatments and required minimum days for head initiation to head maturity. Plant growth regulator treatments significantly improved carotene, total sugar and total chlorophyll content, with highest increase have been recorded in case of T1–GA3 40 mg/l, whereas maximum ascorbic content has been estimated with T9–GA3 20 mg/l+NAA 20 mg/l.

43. Ashok Kumar*, Tsewang Tamchos, Mahaveer Prasad And R. B. Srivastava [Rationalization of potassium requirement for maximum economic yield of onion in Nubra valley of Ladakh, India]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 196-199 (2013). Defence Institute of High Altitude Research (DIHAR) Leh-Ladakh-194 101 (J & K) C/o 56 APO, India *(e-mail : drashokdrdo@gmail.com & yadavashok1@yahoo.co.in)

ABSTRACT

Potassium is very important nutrient to increase the production of good quality onions. However, so far there were no experiments conducted to rationalize the doses of potassium in Nubra valley of Ladakh. Field experiments were conducted with five treatments of potassium (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 kg K2O/ha) along with basal application of 6 t FYM, 4 t vermicompost and 2 t poultry manure per hectare in four replications under randomized block design on onion var. Brown Spanish for two consecutive years (2010 and 2011) at Defence Institute of High Altitude Research, Field Station, Partapur, Ladakh, J & K. Results revealed that the plant growth attributes like number, length and width of leaf, length, diameter and weight of bulb per plant increased significantly with the increasing application of potassium doses over control in each year. The pooled data of both the years showed maximum bulb yield 31150 kg/ha obtained at application of 80 kg K2O/ha followed by 30865 and 30170 kg/ha due to 60 and 40 kg K2O/ha, respectively, was significantly higher over other treatments. The sharp increase in marginal yield of bulbs was seen up to 40 kg K2O/ha, and after that it decreased even after increasing the doses of potassium. Pooled data indicated the increase in bulb yield per cent as 17.65, 12.78, 2.30 and 0.92, respectively, by successive doses of 20, 40, 60 and 80 kg K2O/ha. The maximum BCR 22.02 was obtained at 40 kg K2O/ha. It was, therefore, inferred that application of 40 kg K2O/ha along with 6 t FYM, 4 t vermicompost and 2 t poultry manure/ha was more rational for cultivation of onion compared to further increase of potassium doses in Nubra valley of Ladakh, Trans-Himalayas in J & K, India.

44. Ravindra Kumar, Asha Sinha, Seweta Srivastava and Manisha Srivastava [Effect of green manuring of Sesbania aculeata L. on rhizosphere microflora of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 200-204 (2013). Department of Mycology and Plant Pathology Institute of Agricultural Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Association of rhizosphere microflora of okra under the influence of Sesbania aculeata L. green manuring was investigated during the present study. Four different varieties of okra were selected and presence and absence of rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere micro-organisms were recorded using soil dilution and plate count method. A total of 18 fungal species were isolated from green manure amended plots of four different varieties of okra viz., Mucor racemosus, Rhizopus nigricans, Chaetomium globosum, Phoma hibernica, Macrophomina phaseolina, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus sydowii, Aspergillus sulphureus, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium rubrum, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma viride, Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia sp. Among them, Aspergillus was the most predominant genus with its five different species. The analysis of soil samples from amended plots revealed more frequent microflora due to the effect of S. aculeata L. green manuring as compared to un-amended okra plots. The population of microflora having antagonistic potential was increased with green manure amendment, while plant pathogenic microbial population was recorded to be decreased during the present study.

45. Bandaru Venkata Rajkumar, Anand Kumar Singh, M. Sunil Kumar, M. M. Syamal and Harit Kumar [Effect of cycocel on flowering, fruiting and yield of okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench] cv. Kashi Pragati]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 205-207 (2013). Department of Horticulture Institute of Agricultural Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (Uttar Pradesh), India

ABSTRACT

Various concentrations of growth retardant cycocel (150, 300 and 450 ppm) were applied as seed soaking alone, foliar spray (20 and 40 days after sowing) alone and seed soaking along with foliar spray to study the effect on flowering, fruiting and yield of okra cv. Kashi Pragati. Among the various treatments, cycocel @ 450 ppm as both seed soaking and foliar spray was found to be effective in enhancing the flowering, number of pods per plant, average pod weight, pod length and hence the pod yield.

46. JUGAL K. MANI* AND SUPRAKASH PAL [Influence of weather factors on the abundance of flea beetle (Nisotra chrysomeloides Jacoby) infesting okra]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 208-211 (2013). Regional Research Station (Hill Zone) Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Kalimpong, Darjeeling-734 301 (West Bengal), India

ABSTRACT

The present study was undertaken at the farm of Regional Research Station (Hill Zone), Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Kalimpong, Darjeeling during spring-summer season of 2011 to study the seasonality as well as impact of weather parameters on the infestation of flea beetle (Nisotra chrysomeloides Jacoby) on okra cv. Arka Anamika. The results revealed that flea beetle started to invade the crop in the first week of June (22nd standard week) during the seedling stage of the crop (fifth week after sowing). The pest was active from first week of June to third week of August i. e. from the seedling stage to maturity of the crop. The peak level of population was found during second week of August (32nd standard week) i. e. fifteenth week after sowing (2.43/plant). Significant positive correlation was found between the flea beetle populations with various weather parameters except the maximum temperature. The meteorological parameters exerted immense influence on the infestation of flea beetle. Together all the abiotic factors were responsible for 94% variation in the flea beetle population.

47. S. M. Patel, N. A. Patel, M. B. Parmar, M. P. Patel and J. A. Patel [Studies on variability parameters, correlation and path coefficient analysis in Bt cotton hybrids (H x H)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 212-216 (2013). Regional Research Station Anand Agricultural University, Anand-388 110 (Gujarat), India

ABSTRACT

The study was carried out to determine the genetic variability, correlation and path coefficient analysis of lint yield and component characters. The experimental material comprised 122 Bt cotton hybrids of various seed companies, and experiment was laid out in randomized complete block design with three replications at Regional Research Station, Anand Agricultural University, Anand during kharif 2011. The genotypes showed a wide range of variability for all the characters. All the characters except boll weight showed positive and significant correlation with lint yield at genotypic and phenotypic levels. Lint yield number of bolls per plant and number of monopodia per plant had moderate to high heritability estimates coupled with high genetic advance. It was suggested that these characters could be considered as selection criteria in improvement of lint yield of G. hirsutum.

48. T. HARITHA AND M. LAL AHAMED [Multivariate analysis in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 217-222 (2013). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Bapatla-522 101 (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted to analyze the genetic diversity among 40 genotypes for 21 morpho-physiological characters in upland cotton at Agricultural College Farm, Bapatla, Andhra Pradesh. The 40 genotypes were grouped into seven clusters based on hierarchial cluster analysis. Among all the clusters, cluster II was the largest containing 11 genotypes followed by cluster I with eight genotypes and cluster III with seven genotypes. This random distribution of genotypes indicated absence of parallelism between geographical and genetic diversity. In principal component analysis first eight principal components with eigen value more than one contributed 87.35% towards the total variability. It was, therefore, inferred that the essential features of data set had been represented in the first eight principal components. PC1 contributed maximum towards variability (24.28%).

49. G. K. BOUDH, R. PANDEY, K. N. NAMDEO, G. PANDEY AND K. AHIRWAR [Effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on physiological, biochemical and productivity parameters of ashwagandha [Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal]]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 223-225 (2013). Department of Environmental Science Awadhesh Pratap Singh Vishwavidyalaya, Rewa-486 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during winter seasons of 2010-11 and 2011-12 to study the effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on physiological and biochemical parameters of ashwagandha var. Jawahar-20. Among the organic sources of nutrients, triple biofertilizers (Azospirillum, Azotobacter and phosphate solubilizing bacteria) brought about significantly higher chlorophyll contents (‘a’ and ‘b’), carotene content, phytosynthetic and respiration rates as well as total alkaloid content over the remaining organic sources. However, FYM @ 5 t/ha produced maximum root yield (12.49 q/ha), thereby alkaloid yield (14.7 q/ha). Amongst the inorganic sources of nutrients, 100% RDF (N20P40K20) recorded significantly higher of all these physiological and biochemical parameters including root yield (14.02 q/ha) and alkaloid yield (17.41 q/ha) of ashwagandha.

50. G. K. BOUDH, R. PANDEY, K. N. NAMDEO, G. PANDEY AND K. AHIRWAR [Influence of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on growth, yield and quality of ashwagandha [Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal]]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 226-230 (2013). Department of Environmental Science Awadhesh Pratap Singh Vishwavidyalaya, Rewa-486 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during winter seasons of 2010-11 and 2011-12 to study the effect of organic and inorganic sources of nutrients on growth, yield and quality of ashwagandha var. Jawahar-20. Amongst the applied organic sources of nutrients, farm yard manure (FYM) @ 5 t/ha resulted in maximum growth, yield attributes, yield, quality and net income from ashwagandha. The maximum herbage and root yield from FYM was up to 96.32 and 12.49 q/ha, respectively, with additional net income up to Rs. 39800/ha over biofertilizers. Application of 100% recommended inorganic sources of nutrients (N20P40K20) yielded 98.01 q/ha herbage and 14.02 q/ha roots of ashwagandha with additional net income of Rs. 85600/ha over the control. Thus, FYM was found the most remunerative organic source under the existing agro-climatic conditions of Vindhya region of Madhya Pradesh.

51. Indira Kumari and R. A. Patel [Effect of irrigation and nitrogen on yield of cress (Lepidium sativum L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 231-233 (2013). Department of Agronomy Anand Agricultural University, Anand-388 110 (Gujarat), India

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted during rabi season of 2011-12 at College Agronomy Farm, B. A. College of Agriculture, Anand Agricultural University, Anand (Gujarat) to study the effect of irrigation and nitrogen on cress (Lepidium sativum L.). Higher values of growth characters, yield attributes, seed and straw yield were recorded under treatment I4 ( 0.8 IW : CPE). Each successive increase in the level of N from 40 to 100 kg/ha significantly increased the growth characters, yield attributes, seed and straw yield.

52. S. K. Meena, L. J. Desai, Shaukat Ali, A. Shivran and A. L. Bijarnia [Study on influence of weed control methods on yield, quality and economics in dill seed (Anethum graveolens L.)]. Crop Res. 46 (1, 2 & 3) : 234-237 (2013). Department of Agronomy S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar-385 506 (Gujarat), India

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted on loamy sand soil of Instructional Farm, Department of Agronomy, C. P. College of Agriculture, S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar (Gujarat) during the rabi season of 2011-12 to study the influence of weed control methods on yield, quality and economics in dill seed (Anethum graveolens L.) in randomized block design (RBD) with four replications and 10 weed control treatments comprising T1 : Pendimethalin @ 0.5 kg/ha PE, T2 : Pendimethalin @ 1.0 kg/ha PE, T3 : Pendimethalin @ 0.5 kg/ha PE+one hand weeding after 30 DAS, T4 : Oxadiargyl @ 50 g/ha PoE at 20 DAS, T5 : Oxadiargyl @ 75 g/ha PoE at 20 DAS, T6 : Pendimethalin @ 0.5 kg/ha PE+Oxadiargyl @ 50 g/ha PoE at 20 DAS, T7 : Pendimethalin @ 0.5 kg/ha PE+Oxadiargyl @ 75 g/ha PoE at 20 DAS, T8 : Weed free, T9 : Weedy check and T10 : Farmers’ practice (One hand weeding+one interculturing at 30 DAS). Significantly maximum grain yield of 1294 kg/ha and stover yield of 2255 kg/ha were recorded in the treatment weed free. The treatment involving weed free resulted in significantly highest oil content of (3.95%) and oil yield (51.12 kg/ha). Treatment weed free secured maximum gross returns of Rs. 32356/ha. The lowest gross returns (Rs. 20963/ha) were recorded with treatment unweeded control. The highest net. returns of Rs. 19309/ha and B : C ratio of 2.60 were recorded under treatment pendimethalin 0.5 kg/ha PE+oxadiargyl @ 75 g/ha PoE at 20 DAS. Treatment unweeded control registered the lowest net returns of Rs. 10618/ha and B : C ratio of 2.03.

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