Volume 4, Number 3 (December, 2003)

Titles of research papers/articles alongwith their abstracts.
For full text, please contact to Editor-in-chief at :
info@cropresearch.org


1. M. SRINIVASA REDDY1 AND D. SRINIVASULU REDDY [Nutrient uptake and quality of rice as influenced by different nitrogen management practices]. Res. On Crops. 4 (3) : 291-294 (2003). Department of Agronomy S. V. Agricultural College, Tirupati-517 502 (A. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

 Field experiment was conducted during two consecutive kharif seasons of 2000 and 2001 to study the nutrient uptake (N, P2O5 and K2O) and quality of rice as influenced by different nitrogen management practices. The highest uptake of N, P and K was registered with the application of 100% N through fertilizer and the lowest was recorded with application of 100% N through FYM. Milling characters of rice grain (whole grain per cent, milling per cent and broken grain per cent) and quality parameters of kernel (protein and amylose content) varied significantly due to different N management practices, whereas the cooking quality parameter of elongation ratio did not show any statistically noticeable variation due to different N management practices.


2. S. L. MUNDRA1, A. K. VYAS2 AND M. S. SHAKTAWAT3 [Effect of weed and nutrient management on the economics of maize-wheat cropping sequence]. Res. on Crops. 4 (3) : 295-300 (2003). Rajasthan College of Agriculture Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture & Technology, Udaipur-313 001 (Raj.), India.

ABSTRACT

 An experiment was conducted during kharif and rabi seasons of 1997-98 and 1998-99 to study the effect of weed and nutrient management treatments in maize on the economics of maize, their residual effect on the economics of wheat and maize-wheat cropping sequence. It was emerged out that in maize highest mean net returns (Rs. 13037/ha) and B : C ratio (2.60) were obtained with atrazine 0.5 kg/ha+intercultivation at 35 DAS, while 150% NP through fertilizer was found highest with respect to these parameters. Results of residual study in wheat showed that mean net returns and B : C ratio for all the weed management treatments were found almost identical, while treatment 100% NP through fertilizer+FYM 10 t/ha resulted in highest mean net returns (Rs. 31233/ha) and B : C ratio (6.03) compared to all the treatments specially those lacking with FYM followed by 100% NP through fertilizer and FYM 10 t/ha. Economic returns for the crop sequence indicated that highest mean net returns of Rs. 41311/ha were obtained with atrazine 0.5 kg/ha+intercultivation at 35 DAS, while B : C ratio of 3.99 was highest with atrazine 0.5 kg/ha as pre-emergence. While treatment 100% NP through fertilizer+FYM 10 t/ha stood first with respect to net returns (Rs. 39640/ha) and B : C ratio of 3.90 was observed highest both with 125 and 150% NP through fertilizer for the whole maize-wheat cropping sequence under the influence of nutrient management treatments.


3.H. N. RAVANKAR, R. T. PATIL AND P. A. SARAP [Impact of inorganic fertilizers and organic manures on soil properties and crop yields under soybean-wheat system]. Res. on Crops. 4 (3) : 301-304 (2003). Department of Agricultural Chemistry & Soil Science Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola-444 104 (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

A study was conducted with inorganic and organic sources of fertilizers to assess their performance towards productivity and soil fertility under soybean-wheat cropping sequence on vertisols (Typic Haplustert) of Akola. Four years’ data revealed that application of organics and inorganics increased the fertility status as well as yield of both soybean and wheat over control. Application of S containing fertilizers showed beneficial effects on both yield and fertility status of soil. Amongst organic-inorganic combinations, application of 50% N through Leucaena loppings was found best. Organic manure in combination with fertilizers also maintained yield and soil fertility.


4.N. S. THAKUR1 [Productivity and economic viability of maize (Zea mays) based cropping system under rainfed condition]. Res. on crops. 4 (3) : 305-309 (2003). JNKVV Zonal Agricultural Research Station, Chhindwara-480 001 (M. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

 A field experiment was conducted during 1997-98 and 1998-99 at Chhindwara to study the productivity and economics of maize (Zea mays L.) based cropping systems under rainfed condition. Results reveal that the productivity and economic returns of maize equivalent, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill]-chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) cropping system were significantly superior to remaining cropping systems. Maize+soybean-chickpea cropping system was next to it and sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)-mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern and Coss.] cropping system was the poorest. The land use efficiency, production efficiency and benefit : cost ratio were maximum in soybean-chickpea cropping system than other systems.


5. N. S. THAKUR [Identification in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) based intercropping system under irrigated condition of Satpura Plateau]. Res. on. crops 4 (3) : 310-312 (2003). JNKVV Zonal Agricultural Research Station, Chhindwara-480 001 (M. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) based intercropping systems were studied at Research Farm, Chhindwara (M. P.) during winter seasons of 1996-97 and 1997-98, respectively. Results indicated that chickpea+mustard (4 : 1 row) intercropping system gave the highest yield and monetary advantages and proved significantly superior over sole chickpea. Chickpea+safflower (2 : 2 row) intercropping system and chickpea+mustard (75 : 25 seed ratio) mixed cropping were at par with chickpea+mustard (4 : 1 row) intercropping with regard to yield and profit and they also significantly proved more remunerative than chickpea alone. Intercropping/mixed cropping of barley or linseed with gram was not found promising.


6.N. S. THAKUR1, R. S. RAGHUWANSHI AND R. S. SHARMA [Performance of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] genotypes under different row spacings and seed rates in medium black soils of Satpura Plateau]. Res. on crops. 4 (3) : 313-316 (2003). JNKVV Zonal Agricultural Research Station, Chhindwara-480 001 (M. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Field experiment to evaluate the performance of soybean genotypes under varying row spacings (30 and 40 cm apart) and seed rates (80 and 100 kg/ha) was carried out on medium black soils of Chhindwara during rainy seasons of 1998 and 1999. Genotypes JS 73-22 proved to be top yielder than the other genotypes because of its superiority in primary branches/plant, pods/plant, grains/pod and seed index. Sowing @ 100 kg seed/ha in the rows of 40 cm apart was found suitable for increasing the yields of all genotypes.


7. P. C. BAGEWADI, H. RAMAIAH, N. KRISHNAPPA, K. LOKESH,P. BALAKRISHNA AND PRASHANT SHANKHINAMATH [Effect of nutrition and seasons on seed pod yield and yield attributing characters in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 317-321 (2003). National Seed Project University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India
.

ABSTRACT

Field experiment was conducted at National Seed Project (NSP), Bangalore during kharif and summer seasons of 1999 and 2000 in red sandy loam soil under protective irrigation to study the effect of different levels of macronutrients (NPK), micronutrients (Mo, Bo and Zn) and seasons on yield attributing characters and final yield of groundnut var. JL-24. The study revealed that the treatment supplied with different micronutrients (molybdenum 8 g/kg, boron 6 g/kg and zinc 8 g/kg) in addition to spray of growth regulator (Mapiquat chloride 2 ml/1) alongwith recommended dose of fertilizers (25 : 75 : 38 kg/ha NPK+500 kg/ha gypsum+10 t/ha FYM+375 g/ha Rhizobium) had recorded the highest number of pods per plant (56.06 and 21.10), number of filled pods per plant (49.13 and 13.60), 1000-pod weight (1195.66 and 822.50 g), pod yield/pot (1.79 and 1.26 kg) and total pod yield (2957.77 and 2108.87 kg/ha) in summer and kharif seasons, respectively. Pod yield in summer season was found better as compared to kharif.l.


8.M. D. GIRI, ABDUL HAMID1, D. G. GIRI, R. P. KUWAR AND MOHAMMED SAJID2 [Effect of irrigation and sources of sulphur on yield attributes, yield, consumptive use and water use efficiency of mustard (Brassica juncea)]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 322-326 (2003). Department of Agronomy Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.), India

ABSTRACT

 Four irrigations applied as pre-sowing, at vegetative, 50% flowering and grain filling stage significantly increased the yield attributes, yield, consumptive use (mm), absolute and relative water use rate (mm day-1), but decreased the water use efficiency (kg ha-1 mm). Application of 30 kg S ha-1 through gypsum recorded significantly highest yield attributes, seed yield and water use efficiency (kg ha-1 mm). Consumptive use (mm) was greater with application of 30 kg S ha-1 through bensulf. Absolute and relative water use rates (mm day-1) had no effect of different sources of sulphur. Four irrigations applied as pre-sowing, at vegetative, 50% flowering and grain filling stage in combination with 30 kg S ha-1 through gypsum produced significantly highest dry matter plant-1, test weight, seed yield plant-1 and seed yield ha-1 of mustard.


9. V. VAIYAPURI, A. AMUDHA, M. V. SRIRAMACHANDRASEKHARAN AND M. RAVICHANDRAN [Effect of S levels and organics on seed quality and nutrient uptake of sesame]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 327-330 (2003). Faculty of Agriculture Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were carried out during seasons of summer and kharif 2001 to study the effect of S at varying doses viz., 0, 15, 30 and 45 kg ha-1 and different organics viz., farm yard manure, poultry manure and sulphitation pressmud each applied at 10 t ha-1, on seed quality and nutrient uptake of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cv. TMV 3. The results revealed that seed quality and nutrient uptake were favourably influenced by S and organics compared to control. The highest seed quality and nutrient uptake were noticed in pots received S @ 45 kg ha-1. Application of poultry manure @ 10 t ha-1 recorded the maximum oil content, oil yield and crude protein content.


10. A. K. GUGGARI1, B. M. BIRADAR AND S. B. KALAGHATAGI [Studies on productivity potential and economics of castor based intercropping systems under dryland conditions]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 331-335 (2003). Regional Research Station, Bijapur-586 101 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

 A field experiment was conducted at Regional Research Station, Bijapur (Karnataka) for three years from 1999-2000 to 2001-02 to study the productivity of castor based intercropping system and to find out suitable companion crop for intercropping with castor under dryland conditions. The results showed that castor yield was higher under sole cropping compared to intercropped castor. The reduction in castor yield was more (68.8, 63.8 and 61.9%) when intercropped with sunflower, pigeon pea and finger millet, respectively compared to intercropping with other crops. Castor equivalent yield was higher with castor+sunflower intercropping (1447 kg ha-1) followed by castor+pigeon pea (1389 kg ha-1) over sole crop of castor (1001 kg ha-1). Net monetary returns followed similar trend. While benefit : cost ratio was higher with castor+sunflower (3.12) followed by castor+pearl millet (2.36). Castor+pigeon pea intercropping system was more sustainable (43%) over sole crop of castor (26%) followed by castor+sunflower (32%).


11. K. RAMAMOORTHY, A. CHRISTOPHER LOURDURAJ, S. KUMARAN AND N. SANKARAN [Effect of strip cropping and intercropping of pulses in rainfed finger millet] Res. on crops 4 (3) : 336-339 (2003). Department of Agronomy Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

 A field experiment was carried out at Department of Agronomy, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore on clay loam soil during rabi season of 2001 to study the influence of different legumes on the finger millet productivity. The higher combined grain and vegetable yield of 4006 kg ha-1 was obtained in strip cropping of finger millet (CO 13) with vegetable cowpea (CO 2) cropping system followed by intercropping of finger millet (CO 13) with vegetable cowpea (CO 2) cropping system. The least grain yield of 1856 kg ha-1 was recorded in farmers’ practice of broadcasting finger millet in the 1.5 m space and two rows of pigeon pea (control).


12. K. RAMAMOORTHY, A. CHRISTOPHER LOURDURAJ, S. KUMARAN AND N. SANKARAN [Feasibility study on intercropping of red gram in rainfed finger millet and identification of suitable cultivars]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 340-343 (2003). Department of Agronomy
Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

 A field experiment was carried out during rabi season of 2001 to study the feasibility of pigeon pea as an intercrop in finger millet and determine the influence of pigeon pea on the base crop of finger millet. Highest grain and straw yields were recorded in pure crop of finger millet var. CO 11. With regard to intercropping systems, finger millet var. CO 11+pigeon pea var. VBN 1 recorded higher grain and straw yield compared to other intercropping systems. The crop equivalent yield, land equivalent ratio, net return and B : C ratio were also highest with this same combination.


13. K. RAMAMOORTHY, A. CHRISTOPHER LOURDURAJ, S. KUMARAN AND N. SANKARAN [Effect of intercropping of field bean on growth and yield of ragi and soil nutrient status]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 344-347 (2003). Department of Agronomy Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

 A field experiment was carried out during rabi season of 2001 to find out the effect of field bean on growth and development of finger millet and to study the impact of clipping of vegetative branches on the productivity of intercrops. Highest grain and straw yields were recorded with pure finger millet (CO 11). With regard to intercropping systems, finger millet var. CO 11+field bean determinate type (Improved) with clipping recorded higher grain and straw yields of both finger millet and field bean. The higher grain equivalent yield, land equivalent ratio and net returns were also obtained with the same treatment.


14. E. SATYANARAYANA, P. SHANTHI, P. MARY REKHA AND R. SAI KUMAR [Studies on the identification of suitable parents from high oil maize (Zea mays L.) germplasm for making potential single cross hybrids]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 348-354 (2003). Agricultural Research Station (Maize), Amberpet, Hyderabad (A. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

 The study was undertaken to identify maize lines having high oil coupled with high protein and grain yield at Agricultural Research Station (Maize), Amberpet, Hyderabad during kharif 2000. Per se performance and genetic behaviour for 14 yield and quality parameters were studied in 169 genotypes. The experiment was laid out in simple lattice design (13 x 13 structure) with 169 genotypes. The analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the genotypes for all the traits studied. Plant height, oil content and protein content recorded high heritability (92.12, 91.17 and 90.52) with moderate genetic advance as per cent over mean (18.65, 21.47 and 20.94), whereas oil yield had relatively high heritability (86.65) with highest genetic advance (66.06) indicating better scope for the advancement through direct selection. Grain yield per plot observed lowest heritability (49.12) with high genetic advance (47.42). Character association revealed that the grain yield had significant positive correlation with the parameters studied except with oil protein contents. However, oil and protein content had significant positive correlation with each other. Hence, from results of the present study, it is imperative that while breeding for grain yield in addition to oil and protein content it could be desirable to target for high yielding lines with average oil and protein contents. Among germplasm studied, 10 best genotypes (viz., QPM 12, QPM 35, QPM 23, AML 18, HOL 31, HOL 68, QPM 45, QPM 36, QPM 33 and AML 119) were found promising as potential parents in foregoing breeding programmes to improve maize hybrids having high oil coupled with high protein and grain yields.


15.D. LAKSHMANA, P. SURENDRA AND R. GURUMURTY1 [Genetic variability studies in pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) genotypes]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 355-357 (2003). Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding Regional Research Station & College of Agriculture, P. B. No. 18, Bijapur-586 101 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

Thirty-five genotypes of pearl millet were evaluated for quantitative traits at Regional Research Station, Bijapur in a randomized block design with three replications. Significant genetic difference was observed for all the traits under study. High GCV, PCV and heritability were observed for plant height and earhead weight. High PCV and heritability were observed for days to 50% flowering, grain weight per plant and productive tillers per plant.


16. D. LAKSHMANA, P. SURENDRA AND R. GURUMURTY1 [Combining ability studies in pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.)]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 358-362 (2003). Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding Regional Research Station & College of Agriculture, P. B. No. 18, Bijapur-586 101 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

 Estimates of gca variance and their effects for grain yield and its components in 40 hybrids of pearl millet revealed significant difference between parents for ear length, plant height, days to 50% flowering and days to maturity. The estimates of combining ability variances suggested the predominance of non-additive gene effects in the control of the entire yield contributing characters. The estimates of gca effects revealed that female 88004 A was the best combiner for grain yield and several other yield components. Among the males, the genotype IPC-1684 had the highest gca effects for fodder and grain yield. It also had significant negative gca effect for days to 50% flowering.


17. R. K. MAHAWAR, K. C. SHARMA AND D. K. JAIN [Genetic variability in fodder bajra [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.]] Res. on crops 4 (3) : 363-365 (2003). Department of Plant Breeding & Genetics S. K. N. College of Agriculture, Jobner-303 329 (Rajasthan), India.

ABSTRACT

One hundred genotypes of fodder bajra (Pennisetum glaucum) alongwith three check varieties i. e. UUJ-1, UUJ-2 and Raj Chari Bajra-2 were evaluated for green fodder yield and its related characters at a research farm, S. K. N. College of Agriculture, Jobner for eight quantitative characters. Heritability in broad sense was high for all the characters. Comparison of coefficients of variation indicated that the difference was small, but the PCV were in general higher than GCV for all the characters which indicated the favourable effect of environment on the character expression among all the characters. The characters grain fodder yield per plant and leaf to stem ratio exhibited high expected genetic advance (GA), additive gene action, suggested for direct phenotypic selection, whereas the characters like days to heading, plant height, tillers per plant and leaves per plant having moderate to low GA, non-additive gene action, can be improved through indirect selection.


18. S. B. DESAI, V. W. BENDALE, S. G. BHAVE, R. R. MADAV AND J. L. MEHTA [Heterosis for growth and developmental characters in lablab bean [Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet]*] Res. on crops 4 (3) : 366-372 (2003). College of Agriculture, Dapoli-415 712 (Maharashtra), India.

ABSTRACT

 Fifteen crosses derived from five female lines alongwith three improved testers of Lablab bean [Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet] as male were studied for 12 yield contributing growth and developmental characters. During the investigation, it was observed that heterosis for growth characters indicated positive heterosis of high magnitude for plant height in ACCW-165 x Konkan Bhushan. The cross ACCW-113 x Arka Vijay showed high heterotic effect of 81.17% over M. P. for primary branches plant-1. The character number of leaves plant-1 showed high heterotic effect in the cross ACCW-116 x Arka Vijay. The cross ACCW-116 x Hebbal-3 showed highest effect to the tune of 176.18% over MP and 83.38% over BP for leaf area. Developmental characters also showed negative heterotic effects. The cross ACCW-116 x Arka Vijay showed high negative heterotic effect for days to bud appearance. Hybrid ACCW-116 x Hebbal-3 had high negative heterosis for days to 1st flower appearance and days to 1st pod appearance. ACCW-166 x Hebbal-3 had highest negative heterosis for the character days to 1st pod maturity. The character days to overall maturity had negative heterotic effect shown by cross ACCW-166 x Konkan Bhushan. The flowering span had maximum heterosis of 22.67% as indicated by ACCW-165 x Hebbal-3.


19. D. KUMARESAN1 AND N. NADARAJAN [Heterosis for yield and yield components in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)] Res. on crops 4 (3) : 373-376 (2003). Department of Agricultural Botany Agricultural College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Madurai-625 104 (T. N.), India.

ABSTRACT

 An investigation was carried out on sesamum to evaluate 48 hybrids involving 12 lines and four testers in a line x tester mating design. These 48 hybrids alongwith 16 parents were used to estimate all the three types of heterosis for seven quantitative characters. The hybrid OMT 30 x VRI 1 had higher per se performance and significant standard heterosis for single plant yield and oil content. Among the 48 hybrids studied, the cross OMT 30 x SVPR 1 recorded superior performance for days to 50% flowering, number of capsules and single plant yield on the basis of per se performance and standard heterosis. Hence, these two hybrids can be effectively utilized for heterosis breeding.


20. N. CHATTOPADHYAY, A. SUKLA BAIDYA AND P. K. SAHU1 [Study of character associationship and genetic variability in arecanut]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 377-382 (2003). Department of Spices and Plantation Crops Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur-741 252, Nadia (W. B.), India.

ABSTRACT

 Five promising cultivars of arecanut (Areca catechu L.) viz., Mangala, Mohitnagar, oval type, large round type and small round type were studied for their different growth parameters and genotype environment interactions of the growth parameters at the Horticultural Research Station, B. C. K. V., Nadia, W. B. The study revealed that the cultivars differed significantly with regard to the growth characters like plant height, basal girth, spread of plants (E-W and N-S), breadth of leaf, length of leaflet, number of leaflets per leaf, number of scar mark and leaf area. The study also revealed that all the characters showed high correlation among themselves both at phenotypic and genotypic levels followed by high heritability, genetic advance, genotypic coefficient of variation and phenotypic coefficient of variation, thereby indicating high additive gene action and lesser sensitiveness towards environmental fluctuations. These characters may be exploited for direct selection and for future breeding programme.


21. R. K. PATRA, B. C. DAS AND MD. ABU HASAN [Flowering behaviour and fruit yield of guava cv. Sardar as influenced by different soil covers]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 383-387 (2003). Department of Fruits and Orchard Management Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia (West Bengal), India.

ABSTRACT

 The effect of different mulching treatments (dry leaves, paddy straw, black polythene, saw dust, cover crop or bare soil) on flowering and fruit yield of guava plant (cv. Sardar) was studied at the Horticultural Research Station, Mondouri, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal during 2001. The treatments were applied on 25 January 2001. Significant effect of different mulching treatments had been noted on date of flowering, number of flowers/plant, initial set (%) and fruit retention (%). Mulching with saw dust resulted in earliest flowering (18 April 2001) and highest number of flowers (652.75)/plant. However, highest initial fruit set (82.22%) and maximum fruit retention (59.75%) were recorded by paddy straw and black polythene mulch, respectively. Treatment with different mulches significantly increased number of fruits per plant as well as yield per plant. The plants under black polythene mulch produced maximum yield per plant (44.32 kg) as well as per hectare (12.32 t/ha), although it was interesting to note that all the mulching treatments resulted in higher yield per hectare over control (7.55 t/ha).


22. K. RAVINDER REDDY1 [Effect of growth regulators on the rooting of in vitro produced four parwal genotypes]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 388-394 (2003). Department of Horticulture Agricultural Research Institute, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-30 (A. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

 In parwal (Tricosanthes dioica Roxb.) traditional methods of vegetative propagation require large quantities of propagating material and season dependent. While the in vitro propagated plants are preferred because of uniform, disease free and true to type nature. The in vitro produced shoots were cultivated in half strength MS medium with 2% sucrose supplemented with different concentrations of IAA and IBA for root induction. At 28 days after culture period, half strength MS medium supplemented with IAA 2.0 mg l-1 +IBA 1.5 mg l-1 recorded significantly higher fresh weight (418.6 mg) and number of roots (11.40), whereas the shoot length was significantly superior in half strength MS medium supplemented with IAA 1.0 mg l-1 + IBA 1.5 mg l-1 (10.33 cm).


23. V. W. BENDALE, S. R. KADAM, S. G. BHAVE, J. L. MEHTA AND U. B. PETHE [Genetic diversity studies in okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench]]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 395-399 (2003). College of Agriculture D. B. S. Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli-415 712 (Maharashtra), India

ABSTRACT

 Thirty genotypes of okra were subjected to D2 analysis based on 14 economic characters in order to classify into group constellations. The 30 genotypes were grouped into six clusters, with 21 genotypes in cluster I, three in cluster II, two in clusters III and IV each and clusters V and VI were solitary. No parallelism was observed between clusters and geographic diversity (Singh et al., 1999). Cluster VI showed high mean values for yield and major yield contributing components. The close proximity existed between clusters I and III, while clusters II and VI were wider. Based on inter- and intra-cluster divergence values, the cross combinations between NARDI-812 x NARDI-813 were recommended for improvement in pod length and pod weight, the cross Arka Anamika x Ajeet-311 for plant height and number of nodes per plant and NARDI-812 x KS-410 for improvement in pods per plant and yield per plant.


24. RAJANEESH SINGH AND A. N. MAURYA [Combining ability studies in brinjal (Solanum melongena L.)]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 400-405 (2003). Department of Horticulture Institute of Agricultural Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (U. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

 Combining ability effects were estimated for different characters in a line x tester crossing programme comprising 27 hybrids produced by crossing of nine lines and three testers. Parents and hybrids/crosses differed significantly for gca and sca effects, respectively. The parents JB-15, DBL-24, KS-352, Green round and Green long were found good general combiners for most of the characters including fruit yield per plant. High sca effects were expressed for the cross combinations of DBL-24 x Pant Samrat, Aruna x Pant Rituraj, Punjab Barsati x Ramnagar Giant and DBL-24 x Pant Rituraj and were good specific combiners for yield and most yield attributing characters.


25. SHAMARAO JAHAGIRDAR, D. LAKSHMANA, K. N. PAWAR AND A. K. GUGGARI [Field screening of pearl millet advanced material for their multiple disease resistance under late sown situation in northern Karnataka]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 406-408 (2003). Regional Research Station, Bijapur (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

 Twelve released hybrids and varieties alongwith 16 population improvement entries were screened for their multiple disease resistance against leaf blight and rust during kharif 2001 at Regional Research Station, Bijapur. The entries COCHCV 8 and ICMV-155 showed moderately multiple disease resistant reaction for leaf blight and rust showing their greater acceptability in resistant breeding programme. The released varieties ICTP-8203 and ICMV-221 showed moderately multiple disease resistant reaction showing their adoptability in northern dry zone of Karnataka.


26. N. KRISHNAPPA, S. NARAYANASWAMY, P. BALAKRISHNA, K. LOKESH AND PRASHANT SHANKHINAMATH [Influence of storage mycoflora on seed quality of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) varieties stored in different packaging materials]. Res. on crops 4 (3) : 409-417 (2003). National Seed Project University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

 Groundnut seed pods of varieties JL-24 and TMV-2 produced during kharif 1999 were harvested and sundried to 7.10 and 7.0% moisture content, respectively. Twenty kg pods of each were packed in different packaging materials viz., gunny, tar coated gunny, kraft paper, polylined gunny (400 guage) and high density polyvinyl bags and stored under ambient conditions of Bangalore for 16 months. Bimonthly observations on storage mycoflora, germination per cent, vigour index and moisture content were recorded. During the storage period Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium spp., Penicillium spp., Mucor spp. and Rhizopus spp. were observed. The percentage and number of storage mycoflora increased with increase in storage period in both the varieties with all the packaging materials. There was a negative relationship observed between storage mycoflora and seed quality, as the percentage of storage fungi infection increased, the germinability of seeds and vigour index decreased. However, the percentage of infection by individual fungus and loss of germination per cent, vigour index and fluctuation of moisture content was more in moisture pervious containers (gunny, tar coated gunny and kraft paper bags) compared to moisture impervious containers (high density polyvinyl and polylined gunny 400 guage bags). A. flavus and A. niger were the commonly occurring storage fungi and the storage of seed pods could be done in moisture impervious containers i. e. high density polyvinyl bag for maintaining satisfactory germination per cent (70.33%) which is more than the MSCS (70.00%) even after 14 months of storage and lesser storage fungi infection of 5.5% in both the varieties JL-24 and TMV-2 of groundnut.

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