Volume 39, Number 1,2 & 3 (January, March & May 2010)

By | July 23, 2014

Titles of research papers/articles alongwith their abstracts.
For full text, please contact to Editor-in-chief at :
 md@cropresearch.org

1. Muhanad Walid Akash [Assessment of selected wheat cultivars for drought tolerance using AFLP markers and agronomic traits]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 1-8 (2010). Department of Horticulture and Crop Science The University of Jordan, Amman 11942, Jordan *(e-mail : makash@ju.edu.jo).

ABSTRACT

Drought effects on grain and biological yield, harvest index, 1000-grain weight and plant height were investigated for six most commonly planted Jordanian wheat cultivars during 2006-07. Two experiments were carried out, one under drought-stressed (DS) environment and the second experiment was conducted under non-stressed (NS) environment at two locations. To characterize the relative tolerance, drought susceptibility index (DSI) for grain and biological yield was calculated. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiling was performed and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated using similarity coefficient matrices for AFLP and morphological data. The performance of all measured traits was reduced under DS environment when compared with NS environment for the six studied wheat cultivars. Sham scored the lowest DSI and had the lowest per cent reduction (PR) due to drought stress, but scored the lowest performance in NS environment and performed low to moderate under DS environment. Om-Quais cultivar yielded the highest under DS environment and had the second lowest reduction in grain and biological yield due to drought stress. No significant relationships, based on Jaccard’s similarity matrices, between AFLP and morphological data were observed (r = 1.5% between AFLP and DS morphological data, r = 9.2% between AFLP and NS morphological data, r = 2.9% between AFLP and combined DS & NS morphological data). However, cultivars with the lowest biological and grain DSI and PR, highest overall mean performance and highest genetic dissimilarity would serve as valuable plant material in traditional and molecular breeding programmes by identifying drought tolerant genes or quantitative trait loci (QTL).
2. S. Marimuthu, S. Subbulakshmi and P. Subbian [Effect of irrigation regimes on water saving, growth and yield of rice under lowland condition]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 9-13 (2010). Agricultural Machinery Research Centre Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were conducted at wetland farm of Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to study the impact of irrigation regimes and plastic film mulches in lowland rice during wet season 2001 and 2002. The experiment was laid out in split plot design with three irrigation regimes allotted to the main plots and the combination of mulching and nitrogen management allotted to the sub-plots. The results revealed that continuous submergence recorded higher LAI, productive tillers, grain and straw yield compared to alternate wetting and drying regimes. Alternate wetting and drying regimes recorded longer roots, whereas continuous submergence recorded more root volume and root dry weight. The consumption of water was more under continuous submergence compared to alternate wetting and drying regimes. However, water use efficiency was higher under alternate wetting drying regimes. Saving of more amount of water recorded under plastic mulched plot.

3. H. M. JAYADEVA, T. K. PRABHAKARA SETTY, A. G. BANDI AND R. C. GOWDA [Water use efficiency, energetics and economics of rice as influenced by crop establishment techniques and sources of nitrogen]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 14-19 (2010). Agricultural Research Station, Kathalagere-560 219 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were carried out during kharif 2005 and summer 2006 to know the influence of crop establishment techniques and sources of nitrogen on water use efficiency, energetics and economics of rice. The SRI establishment technique recorded significantly higher grain yield (10169, 10492 and 10331 kg/ha), water use efficiency (65.26, 64.49 and 64.87 kg/ha-cm), energy output : input ratio (19.57, 18.10 and 18.84), gross income (Rs. 65551, 68598 and 67575/ha) and B : C ratio (2.54, 268 and 2.61) in kharif, summer and poold analysis, respectively, compared to transplanting and aerobic techniques. Among the sources of nitrogen, application of large sized urea granules recorded higher grain yield (9084, 9374 and 9228 kg/ha), water use efficiency (60.11, 58.01 and 59.06 kg/ha-cm), energy output : input ratio (17.68, 16.37 and 17.03), gross income (Rs. 59515, 61365 and 60440/ha) and B : C ratio (2.44, 2.64 and 2.54) as compared to application of urea, 17 : 17 : 17 (complex) and ammonium sulphate.

4. Jagdish Kumar, M. P. Yadav and Kedar Prasad [Production potential of hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) as influenced by integrated nutrient management]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 20-23 (2010). Department of Agronomy Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out during kharif seasons of 2006 and 2007 to study the effect of integrated nutrient management on yield, nutrient composition and soil fertility status in hybrid rice. Data revealed that combined application of inorganic, organic and biofertilizer sources of plant nutrient significantly increased panicle length, number of grains/panicle and grain weight/panicle of hybrid rice than inorganic fertilizer application. Application of 100% SSNM+5 t FYM/ha+BGA+Azotobacter produced significantly highest grain (80.95 q/ha) and straw yields (90.88 q/ha) of hybrid rice than 100% RDF and farmers’ practice. Nutrient (NPK) uptake in grain and straw of hybrid rice was recorded significantly higher in combined application of organic and biofertilizers with inorganic fertilizer than farmers’ practice. Available nutrient status (OC%, P and K) in the soil was restored more in 100% SSNM+5 t FYM/ha+BGA+Azotobacter than farmers’ practice. Farmers’ practice recorded the lowest growth, yield attributes, yield and nutrient composition in grain and straw and soil fertility status in the soil.

5. B. VAJANTHA, K. SREENIVASULU REDDY and M. V. S. NAIDU [Effect of organic and inorganic sources of N on available soil nutrient status in maize]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 24-27 (2010). Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry S. V. Agricultural College, Tirupati (A. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the integrated use of organic and inorganic N sources on soil fertility in maize during rabi 2004-05 at dry land farm, S. V. Agricultural College, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh. The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design with factorial concept consisting of combinations of four levels (100, 75, 50 and 25% organic N) each of vermicompost (VC), poultry manure (PM), farm yard manure (FYM) and sulfitation pressmud (SPM). Conjunctive use of organic manures and inorganic fertilizers significantly influenced the nutrient status of soil. The available soil nutrients viz., N, P, K and S were significantly influenced by different sources, levels and their interactions. The highest N, P, K and S in soil was recorded with PM when compared to other treatments tried in this study. Application of N through 50% organic source recorded highest N, P, K and S content in soil. Regarding the interaction, the highest N, P, K and S in soils was recorded in PM with 50% organic N treated plots.

6. S. SUBBULAKSHMI, P. SUBBIAN AND N. SARAVANAN [Effect of tillage and weed management practices on weed population dynamics in maize-sunflower]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 28-31 (2010). Agricultural Machinery Research Centre Agricultural Engineering College & Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India *(e-mail : sumiagri@rediffmail.com).

ABSTRACT

Field experiment was conducted during kharif and rabi seasons of 2005-06 to study the effect of different tillage and weed management practices on weed population dynamics in maize-sunflower cropping system. The results revealed that continuous zero tillage resulted in increased perennial and some annual grass weed species. Treatments those received zero tillage after conventional tillage recorded higher density of other grasses. Density of Cyperus rotundus was higher in treatments those received conventional tillage. Amaranthus viridis and Amaranthus polygamus density was higher in zero tillage treated plot. But at the end of study period, their density became nil. Hand weeded plot significantly reduced all grass and broad-leaved weeds. Herbicide treated plot failed to reduce grassy weeds effectively.

7. P. P. Chaudhari, P. T. Patel, B. t. patel and l. j. desai [Growth and yield of grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) as influenced by nitrogen management under different moisture stress]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 32-38 (2010). Directorate of Research S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar-385 506 (Gujarat), India.

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted at Regional Research Station, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar, Gujarat, India during rabi seasons of two consecutive years 2004-05 and 2005-06 to study the nitrogen management with bio-fertilizers in grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.) under different moisture stress on sandy loam soils. Dry matter production per plant decreased with increase in moisture stress. No moisture stress exhibited significantly higher dry matter production per plant than that of with moisture stress at active vegetative stage and moisture stress at active vegetative and grain filling stages. Similarly, no moisture stress reflected its superiority in terms of CGR, RGR and NAR. Imposing stress at two growth stages (active vegetative and grain filling stages) showed poor performance at later growth period for these attributes. No moisture stress ranked at top recording higher values of plant height, leaf area per plant, leaf area duration, stem thickness, length of main inflorescence and number of lateral spikelets per plant. But moisture stress at active vegetative stage surpassed moisture stress at active vegetative and grain filling stages in terms of length of inflorescence and number of lateral spikelets. Grain and stover yield was significantly higher with no moisture stress. No moisture stress produced 16.58 and 22.07% higher grain yield over moisture stress at active vegetative stage and moisture stress at active vegetative and grain filling stages, respectively, in pooled data. For stover yield, also both these treatments behaved equally. Among the nitrogen management treatments, 60 kg N/ha integrating seed inoculation with Azotobacter liquid culture brought remarkable improvement in growth parameters viz., plant height, leaf area, LAD, NAR, CGR, RGR, stem thickness and yield attributes viz., length of main inflorescence and number of lateral spikelets which ultimately reflected to increase in higher grain and stover yield during both the years and in pooled data. It gave 12.39, 45.88 and 223.27% higher grain yield over N60, N40 and N0, respectively in pooled data.

8. J. D. Thanki and R. K. Solanki [Response of rabi pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] to moisture regimes and fertilizer management with and without FYM under south Gujarat condition]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 39-42 (2010). Department of Agronomy Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari-396 450 (Gujarat), India.

ABSTRACT

Results of a field experiment conducted at College Farm, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari during rabi season of 2004-05 revealed that irrigating the crop at 0.9 IW/CPE ratio (I3) resulted in significantly the highest seed (1429 kg/ha) and straw (3921 kg/ha) yields. An application of 100% recommended dose (20-40-0 NPK kg/ha) of NPK (F1) recorded significantly the highest seed (1402 kg/ha) and straw (3809 kg/ha) yields. FYM @ 10 t/ha (M1) produced significantly its superiority in seed (1329 kg/ha) and straw (3629 kg/ha) yields. Treatment combination F1M1 (100% recommended dose of NPK coupled with FYM @ 10 t/ha) yielded (1416 kg/ha) significantly the highest seed yield.

9. p. g. shete, j. d. thanki, s. l. adhav and y. m. kushare [Response of rabi greengram (Vigna radiata L.) to land configuration and inorganic fertilizer with and without FYM].Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 43-46 (2010). Instructional Farm Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari-396 450 (Gujarat), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rabi season of 2007-08 at Instructional Farm, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari to find out the response of land configuration, inorganic fertilizers and farm yard manure on rabi greengram. Sowing on raised bed recorded significantly the highest plant height, number of branches per plant, dry matter accumulation, number of pods per plant, test weight and seed (972.89 kg/ha) yield. These were 20.34% higher over flat bed. Among the levels of inorganic fertilizers, 100% RDF outrightly dominated and established its significant performance in respect of almost all the growth and yield attributes. Application of 100% RDF produced significantly the highest plant height, number of branches per plant, dry matter accumulation, number of pods per plant, test weight and seed (998.79 kg/ha) yield. The increase in seed yield under application of 100% RDF was to the tune of 27.63% over 75% RDF. The results further revealed that seed yield as well as most of the growth and yield attributes were significantly increased by the application of FYM @ 5 t/ha. Significantly the highest seed (964.27 kg/ha) yield was recorded with the application of FYM @ 5 t/ha. This was 18.01% higher seed yield over control.

10. d. d. yadav, kedar prasad, om pal singh, babulal and s. kumar [Effect of plant geometry and application techniques of DAP on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)]. Crop Res.39 (1, 2 & 3) : 47-49 (2010). Department of Agronomy C. S. Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur (U. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rabi seasons of 2005-06 and 2006-07 to find out the effect of different plant geometries (broadcasting, regular sowing, cross sowing and skip method with 30 and 45 cm row spacing) and DAP application technique (broadcasting and placement method) on growth, yield attributes, grain yield and economic returns of chickpea. Among sowing methods, regular sowing at 30 cm produced significantly better growth, yield attributes, grain yield (21.82 q/ha) and net profit (Rs. 48587/ha). In case of application technique of DAP, placement method proved to be significantly better by producing superior growth, yield attributes, grain yield (19.89 q/ha) and net profit (Rs. 43630/ha) over broadcasting.

11. Hani M. Saoub, Nasri I. Haddad, Monther T. Sadder and Maha Syouf [Morphological and molecular characterization of wild lentil collected from eq Jordan]. Crop Res. 39(1, 2 & 3) : 50-61 (2010). Department of Horticulture and Crop Science University of Jordan, P. O. Box 3776, Amman-11821, Jordan.

ABSTRACT

Lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.) seed is an important source of protein for human consumption, especially in dry areas where lentils are often the only pulse crop that can be produced under prevailing conditions of low soil fertility and limited moisture. The narrow genetic base of the cultivated lentil calls for the transfer of useful genes from other sources, such as the wild lentil species. Two collection missions were conducted to collect lentil wild types, which resulted in the collection of 16 populations from different parts of Jordan. The results showed that wild lentil was naturally grown in the oak forest habitat in stony and rocky areas. Twelve agronomic and morphological traits were studied and substantial variation was recorded among the collected populations for these traits. Total of 65 unique and polymorphic DNA markers were developed for lentil wild types based on seven different RAPD primers. The DNA polymorphic analysis revealed high variability within some collection sites including the populations UJWL 8, UJWL 9 and UJWL 10. Moreover, some wild type samples were neither grouped to their counterparts in the same population, nor grouped to any other wild lentils from other populations e. g. 11A, 1B, 11B, 2D, 7-2 and 6A. Unique individuals with high diversity are very important candidates for breeding purposes. With potential use in lowering sample size by excluding collection duplicates, developing homozygous breeding lines from wild types, screening for desired traits to be engaged in marker assisted selection breeding and test of wild type contamination during backcrossing with breeding lines. The collected wild lentil populations in the present study was conserved in the national gene bank and the most promising ones are under further evaluation to identify superior genes that could be used for the improvement of the cultivated lentil.

 

12. G. S. Buttar and Anureet Kaur [Performance of different genotypes of clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) under various sowing dates]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 62-64 (2010). Punjab Agricultural University Regional Station, Bathinda (Punjab), India.

ABSTRACT

The field experiment was conducted at Research Farm of Punjab Agricultural University Regional Station, Bathinda, India during kharif seasons of 2001, 2002 and 2003. Significantly higher plant height, pods per plant, 100-seed weight and grain yield were observed when the crop was sown on 10 June than 25 June and 10 July. However, the date of sowing had no significant effect on primary and secondary branches per plant. Amongst various varieties, HGS-365 performed better than AG-112 and RGC-936 owing to higher number of pods/plant and 100-seed weight.

13. B. A. KASAR AND K. R. CHAVHAN [Effects of pendimethalin and different doses of ALS (Aceto lactate synthase) inhibitor on growth and yield of groundnut]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 65-67 (2010). Zonal Agricultural Research Station Central Vidarbha Zone, Waghapur Road, Yavatmal-445 001 (Maharashtra), India.

ABSTRACT

Field experiment on weed control studies in groundnut was carried out at the University Farm of Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapith. Akola during kharif 2002 to study the effects of pendimethalin and different doses of ALS (Aceto lactate synthase) inhibitor herbicide on growth and yield of groundnut. Weed free check as well as two hoeings and two weedings at 20 and 40 days after sowing (DAS) recorded more height, dry matter accumulation of plant and dry pod yield. Among integrated treatments, application of ALS (Aceto lactate synthase) inhibitor @ 50, 62.5, 75 and 100 g a. i./ha at 5 DAS followed by 1 H+1 HW at 35 DAS as well as ALS inhibitor herbicide at 50 g a. i.+pendimethalin 250 g a. i. /ha at 5 DAS followed by 1 H+1 HW at 35 DAS observed significantly more growth in dry matter accumulation and dry pod yield as compared to lonely application of herbicide pendimethalin.

 

14. Saeed shahbazi*, Hamid Rahimian-Mashhadi and Hassan Mohammad-Alizadeh [Response of different sesame (Sesamum indicum) cultivars to the interference from red root pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 68-73 (2010). Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding Agricultural and Natural Resources Campus University of Tehran, P. O. Box 31587-77871, Karaj, Iran *(e-mail : s_shahbazi1000@yahoo.com).

ABSTRACT

Amaranthus retroflexus is a problematic weed in sesame crop. Field experiment was carried out in 2007-08 growing season at the Research Farm of University of Tehran, Karaj, Iran, to evaluate the competitive ability of four sesame (Sesamum indicum) cultivars (Oltan, Varamin 2822, Naz uniculm and Karaj 1) in competition with red root pigweed at 0, 2, 4, 8 and 16 plants/m2. Sesame biological and grain yield loss under weed competition was investigated using empirical equation based on the Cousens’s hyperbolic crop yield model. Sesame cultivars varied in their competitive ability against red root pigweed in terms of both yield and biomass measurements. Under weed free conditions Varamin 2822 (1179.2 kg/ha) and Karaj 1 (768.5 kg/ha) had the most and least grain yields, respectively. The highest and lowest biological yields were observed in Oltan (3866.82 kg/ha) and Naz uniculm (1896.92 kg/ha) in weed free plots, respectively. The maximum yield loss estimated from the Cousens’s model was highest in Varamin 2822 (49.6%), while this was not more than 17.9% in Oltan indicating the higher competitive ability of Oltan.

15. H. prakasha, n. krishna murthy, y. m. ramesha, p. r. somashekharappa, s. sridhara and vijay mahantesh [Influence of graded levels of sulphur on seed yield, quality, available nutrients and uptake of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 74-76 (2010). Department of Agronomy College of Agriculture, G. K. V. K., Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during the kharif season of 2006 to study the influence of graded levels of sulphur on seed yield, quality, available nutrients and uptake of soybean. Among the various treatments, maximum protein yield (871.25 kg/ha), oil yield (397.50 kg/ha), seed yield (20.5 q/ha), available phosphorus (50.4 kg/ha), available sulphur (26.5 kg/ha), uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sulphur (194.0, 21.8, 78.7 and 9.9 kg/ha, respectively) were recorded in treatment with application of sulphur at the rate of 40 kg/ha.

16. H. prakasha, n. krishna murthy, y. m. ramesha, h. m. chidanandappa, k. n. kalyana murthy and m. m. venkatesha [Effect of graded levels of sulphur on growth, yield and economics of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 77-79 (2010). Department of Agronomy College of Agriculture, G. K. V. K., Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during the kharif season of 2006 to study the effect of graded levels of sulphur on growth, yield and economics of soybean. Among the various treatments, maximum plant height (60.9 cm), number of green leaves (2.5), leaf area (149.5 cm2), leaf area index (0.49), leaf area duration (82.0), total dry matter production (23.11 g), pod yield (27.5 q/ha), seed yield (20.5 q/ha) and stalk yield (40.5 q/ha), gross returns (Rs. 41,000), net returns (Rs. 28,020) and B : C ratio (2.15) were recorded in application of sulphur at the rate of 40 kg/ha.

17. Balwan Singh, V. S. Arya, B. S. Duhan and V. Kumar [A study on leaching behaviour of sulphur in soils as affected by sulphur levels, organic matter, CaCO3 and method of S application]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 80-83 (2010). Department of Soil Science CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

One of the major causes of loss of sulphur in sandy soils is its leaching, so a number of experiments were conducted in laboratory, to study its leaching in sandy soils as affected by different factors in plexiglass columns filled with soil, compacted to a bulk density of 1.45 g/cm3. Powdered K2SO4 was applied in 0-3 cm layer on weight basis and 5 cm of water was applied. Sampling was done after 24 h of water application. The rate of S application did not affect the leaching depth of S in soils. Application of CaCO3 decreased the movement of S in soils. The peaks were observed at 12-15, 9-12 and 6-9 cm depths with 0, 5 and 10% of CaCO3 in soils, respectively. CaCO3 also decreased the concentration of SO4-S in different layers. Increasing levels of organic matter decreased the movement of S. Peaks were detected at 12-15, 9-12 and 6-9 cm depth with application of 0, 1 and 2% of organic matter in soils, respectively. S moved to deeper layers when mixed in top 0-3 cm layer in comparison to when applied, as surface broadcasting.

18. P. N. Tripathi, D. P. Dubey, B. S. Dwivedi and R. C. Sharma [Genesis and classification of some typical soils of village Pal, district Satna (M. P.)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 84-87 (2010). Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Harda (M. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Three representative soil pedons belonging to Pal village of block Amarpatan, district Satna were characterized and classified. The soils were moderately deep to deep. The soil colour varied from dark brown to dark grayish brown and very dark grayish brown. The texture of deep soils was clay, while that of pedon 1 (moderately deep) was clay loam. The deep soils showed typical characteristics of Vertisols. Sub-angular to angular blocky structures were also observed in middle horizons of most of the pedons. Effervescence was observed in almost all the pedons in lower horizons. Well developed intersecting slickensides were noticed in pedon 3. The soils were neutral to moderately alkaline in reaction. The organic carbon contents in these soils were medium in surface and decreased with depth. Cation exchange capacity (CEC), Ca++ and Mg++ ions were found high in horizons where clay was more. Considering morphological, physical and chemical characteristics, pedons 1, 2 and 3 were classified as Typic Haplustepts, Vertic Haplustalfs and Typic Haplusterts, respectively.

19. MOOLCHAND SINGH*, S. PRABHUKUMAR AND C. V. SAIRAM [Effect of slow release nitrogen fertilizer on the growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 88-90 (2010). ICAR Zonal Project Directorate, Zone VIII MRS, HA Farm Post, Hebbal, Bangalore-560 024, India *(e-mail : mcsingh@nbpgr.ernet.in).

ABSTRACT

An on-farm trial was conducted with a view to observe the efficiency of urea super granule on growth and yield of tomato. The variety ‘Arka Vikas’ was tested at farmers’ field in the Haveri district of Karnataka for two consecutive years during 2005-06 and 2006-07. The trial was laid out in randomized block design with three replications. Two forms of urea i. e. prilled urea and urea super granule with different rates were used. The results revealed that urea super granule had significant positive effect on the yield of tomato as compared to normal urea. The recommended dose of N (150 kg/ha) from urea super granule gave the significantly highest fruit yield of 79.13 t/ha in 2005-06 and 73.60 t/ha in 2006-07. The yield obtained with the application of 90 and 80% recommended dose of nitrogen from urea super granule was statistically identical to the yield obtained from 100% recommended dose of N from prilled urea. The 150 and 135 kg/ha of N from urea super granule gave 11 and 2% higher yield of tomato than that of using 150 kg/ha N from prilled urea, respectively. These results implied that efficiency of urea super granule was found to be positive on the yield of tomato and 20% N could be saved using urea super granule compared to prilled urea. The economic analysis also showed that the use of urea super granule was economically viable to cultivate tomato. The farmers were found to be quite happy with the higher yield of tomato for the application of urea super granule and they expressed their willingness to use urea super granule for tomato cultivation.

20. P. SAIDAIAH, S. SUDHEER KUMAR AND M. S. RAMESHA [Variability for yield and yield component attributes in rice]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 91-93 (2010). Directorate of Rice Research Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Eighty-six rice genotypes well adapted to different agro-climatic conditions were used to understand the genetic variability. All the characters exhibited significant variability. Phenotypic coefficients of variation (PCV) were higher than genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV) for all the characters studied indicating the role of environmental variance in the total variance. Heritability estimates and expected genetic advance were high for filled grains/panicle, flag leaf width, culm length, panicle weight, 1000-seed weight and grain yield/plant suggesting that these were more useful for targeted yield improvement programmes in rice.

21. R.P. khandare and s. p. patil [Screening of advanced breeding material of sorghum against shoot fly, Atherigona soccata (Rondani)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 94-97 (2010). Sorghum Research Unit Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

The present investigation of screening of 19 advanced breeding lines of sorghum alongwith three checks against shoot fly was carried out in randomized block design on the farm of Sorghum Research Unit, Dr. PDKV, Akola in kharif season of 2004-05. The advanced breeding lines were screened on the basis of average number of eggs laid and per cent dead hearts per plant at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after emergence. Resistant checks IS-18551 and IS-2205 recorded significantly minimum number of eggs per plant and were closely followed by AKSV-37 and AKSV-30. The resistant checks also exhibited minimum average percentage of dead hearts.

22. G. P. Chauhan, v. p. chovatiya, j. j. savaliya, d. r. mehta and a. g. pansuriya [Heterosis studies in pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 98-102 (2010). Department of Agricultural Botany Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh-362 001 (Gujarat), India.

ABSTRACT

Heterosis in pearl millet was studied in a set of 8 x 8 diallel cross excluding reciprocals. The analysis of variance revealed highly significant differences for all the characters, suggesting the presence of considerable genetic diversity in the material studied. The magnitudes of heterosis varied from cross to cross for all the characters. It might be inferred that magnitude of heterotic effect was high for grain yield per plant, number of effective tillers per plant, number of grains per square cm and days to flowering; moderate for days to maturity, days to anthesis, earhead length, plant height, 1000-grain weight, whereas the least heterosis was observed for earhead weight, earhead girth, dry fodder yield per plant and harvest index. The crosses J-2454 x J-2340, 276-SB-07 x J-2480 and J-2480 x J-2454 exhibited the highest, significant and positive heterotic effect and mean performance for grain yield per plant and some of its component traits.

23. VEDNA KUMARI, B. C. SOOD, RAMA KALIA AND JAI DEV [Phenotypic stability for seed yield and component characters in Ethiopian mustard (Brassica carinata A. Braun)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 103-106 (2010). Department of Crop Improvement, Forages & Grassland Management CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

The present study on stability of seed yield and its component characters was undertaken during rabi seasons of 2002-03, 2003-04, 2004-05 and 2005-06 involving eight diverse genotypes of Ethiopian mustard (Brassica carinata A. Braun). Significance of genotype x environment interaction for days to 50% flowering, days to 75% maturity, 1000-seed weight and seed yield indicated the varying performance of genotypes for these characters across the environments. Predictable as well as non-predictable components contributed significantly towards the differential response of genotypes observed for days to 50% flowering and 1000-seed weight. For seed yield, only one genotype PCC-5, having average stability over years, could be considered an ideal genotype. Three other genotypes viz., HC-9605, Kiran and Jayanti exhibited average stability for days to 50% flowering and 1000-seed weight besides recording high per cent oil content (40.1 to 41.3%).

24. B. SRINIVAS, KULDEEP SINGH DANGI AND LAXMI PRAYAGA [Correlation and path analysis studies for yield and its components in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genotypes]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 107-110 (2010). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding College of Agriculture, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad (A. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Correlation studies on 45 sunflower genotypes revealed that seed yield per plant was significantly and positively associated with plant height, stem diameter, head diameter, head weight, number of filled seeds per head, 100-seed weight, leaf area index and total dry matter per plant, whereas the traits days to 50% flowering, days to maturity and number of unfilled seeds per head exhibited non-significant positive association. Path coefficient studies indicated maximum direct positive effect of number of filled seeds per head on yield followed by 100-seed weight and total dry matter per plant. The characters plant height, head diameter, head weight and leaf area index showed negative direct effect on seed yield per plant.

 

25. N. Senapati and R. C. Misra [Induction of micromutation in M2 and its relationship for production of high yielding mutants in blackgram]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 111-119 (2010). Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics Orissa University of Agriculture & Technology, Bhubaneswar-751 003 (Orissa), India.

ABSTRACT

Seeds of two blackgram varieties PDU-1 and Sarala were treated with three doses each of Gamma-rays, EMS, NG, MH and combination. The M1 generation was harvested in bulk and the M2 to M4 generations were raised during 2003-04. In M2 generation, most treatment popualtions exhibited reduction in mean and increase in variance for all the six quantitative traits studied and magnitude of such change varied with mutagens, their doses and the variety. The negative shift of mean was more conspicuous for yield/plant in Basant Bahar and plant height in Sarala. In most cases, higher doses of mutagens induced greater variance. A comparative study of the effect of mutagens revealed that the shift of mean and variance was more pronounced in NG and combined treatment of both the varieties. The genetic parameters like range, mean, GCV, heritability and genetic advance in M2 populations were estimated for important yield components such as pods/plant, seeds/pod, 100-seed weight and yield/plant. Almost all mutagenic treatments induced wider range of variation than parent variety in both the directions. GCV estimates varied with mutagenic treatments and were moderately high for pods/plant and yield/plant in both the varieties. Heritability estimates for different traits were relatively higher magnitude indicating greater scope of selection, GA as percentage of mean also increased in treatments and comparatively higher for pods/plant in both the varieties. In this study, mutagenic treatments were classified into four groups on the basis of M2 mean and variance for yield/plant. Following selection among the M2 plants and M3 progenies on the basis of higher yield, 11 high yielding mutant cultures in PDU-1 and seven mutants in Sarala were isolated in M4 generation. Vast majority of the high yielding M3 progenies and M4 mutant cultures were from the groups of M2 mutagenic treatments showing significantly higher population variance for yield/plant. Thus, selection of high yielding M2 plants and M3 progenies in mutagenic treatments with much increased M2 population variance for yield would be effective in isolation of high yielding micromutant cultures.

26. A. Nagaraja*, Y. A. Nanja Reddy, B. Anjaneya Reddy, T. S. S. K. Patro, 
Bijendra Kumar, J. Kumar and K. T. Krishne Gowda [Reaction of finger millet recombinant inbred lines (RILs) to blast]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 120-122 (2010). All India Coordinated Small Millets Improvement Project, Bangalore (Karnataka), India *(e-mail : alurnag@yahoo.co.in).

ABSTRACT

Hundred and twenty recombinant inbred lines were developed by crossing IE-2885 x IE-2912 parents known for blast resistance and high yield. The recombinant inbred lines so developed were evaluated under field conditions in different agro climatic conditions viz., Bangalore, Vizianagaraam and Ranichauri during 2006 and 2007. Significantly more rainfall during 2007 resulted in more blast on neck and fingers. Low temperature and high RH (>80%) and high rainfall are conducive for blast development. The neck and finger blasts were negatively correlated with biomass and seed yield. Blast resistant high yielding RILs viz., MLC-29-5, 54-4, 63-4-1 and 89-4 with 2% disease were identified.

27. A. Nagaraja*, Y. A. Nanja Reddy, Jayarame Gowda and B. Anjaneya Reddy [Association of plant characters and weather parameters with finger millet blast]. Crop Res. 39(1, 2 & 3) : 123-126 (2010). Project Coordinating Unit AICRP on Small Millets, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India *(e-mail : alurnag@yahoo.co.in).

ABSTRACT

A core set of 520 finger millet accessions was evaluated for blast resistance under prevailing weather parameters. The incidence of neck blast and finger blast decreased significantly when the temperature increased from 23.9° to 27.0°C and the rainfall reduced from 303 to 83.4 mm during the flowering period, however, the RH remained almost constant (88.34 to 88.90%). The glumes cover was high in short duration accessions. Glumes cover and seed protein content were significantly and positively correlated with neck blast and finger blast incidence. Accessions (short duration) having shorter finger length and low calcium were more prone to blast.

28. SANJAY SINGH, R. K. GAUTAM, R. K. SINGH AND R. DESHMUKH [Diversity analysis of Sesbania acculeata by using transferable rice SSR markers]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 127-131 (2010). Biotechnology Laboratory, Crop Improvement Division Central Soil Salinity Research Institute, Karnal-132 001 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

In this experiment, the transferability of 13 rice (Oryza sativa) simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci to Sesbania acculeata (27 accessions) was studied. Upto 17.5% of the rice micro satellite primer pairs amplified SSRs within S. acculeata. The highest level of successful with a single primer (RM 6160) was 40.7% for S. acculeata. The transferability of these SSR primers indicated a high level of sequence conservation in these regions across genus even taxa. Together with their locus-specificity, co-dominant nature and potential to amplify multiple alleles, their transferability makes simple sequence repeats marker a powerful tool for genetic mapping, diversity analysis and genotyping. Knowledge of DNA sequence is essential before SSR loci can be meaningfully used to address applied and evolutionary questions. The true benefit of the transfer of these markers between species lies in the reduced need to undergo expensive and labour intensive methodology to develop genus-specific SSR marker.

29. L. PRASANTHI*, P. MAHESHWARA REDDY, P. S. SUDHAKAR, B. BALAKRISHNA BABU AND K. RAJA REDDY [Genetic divergence studies in Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) for seed yield and oil content]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 132-135 (2010). A. N. G. R. A. U. Regional Agricultural Research Station, Tirupati-517 502 (A. P.), India *(e-mail : prasanthi64@rediffmail.com).

ABSTRACT

The evaluation of 45 Jatropha accessions assembled from different geographical locations for 11 quantitative characters revealed the presence of wide genetic diversity as they formed four clusters. Clustering pattern revealed that there was no parallelism between geographical and genetic diversity among the genotypes studied. Number of seeds per plant, SPAD chlorophyll meter reading (SCMR), number of seeds per capsule and shelling percentage contributed maximum towards genetic divergence. Based on mean performance, genetic distance and clustering pattern, hybridization involving parents Pasuvulabanda collection in cluster IV and C. D. Palli, N. C. Palli and Borramamidi collection in cluster I and Annavaram collection in cluster II could give higher yielding lines in Jatropha.

30. VIRENDRA SINGH, B. S. CHHILLAR AND RAM SINGH [Studies on various physico-chemical traits of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) associated with resistance to melon fruit fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 136-144 (2010). Department of Entomology CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

Twelve genotypes of bitter gourd viz., six resistant (IC-213311, IC-256185, IC-248256, IC-248282, HK-127 and MC-58), four medium resistant (HK-112, HK-156, BL-237 and Jaunpuri), one susceptible [IC-44410] and one highly susceptible (IC-85619-A) to melon fruit fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae were included to study the different physico-chemical traits associated with resistance and their influence on pest multiplication. Per cent fruit infestation and larval density were significantly and positively correlated with fruit diameter and negatively correlated with fruit toughness. Ascorbic acid, nitrogen, protein, phosphorus, silica, tannin, flavanol, total phenol, total ash, potassium, reducing sugar, non-reducing sugar and total sugar were significantly and negatively correlated with fruit fly infestation (r= -0.85 to -0.98) and larval density/fruit (r=-0.85 to -0.96), while the moisture content was positively associated with fruit fly infestation (r=0.89) and larval density/fruit (r=0.89).

31. B. V. Bhaskara Reddy, Y. S. Ahlawat and R. P. Pant [Transmission of citrus yellow mosaic virus and its detection in mealybugs (Planococcus citri) by dot-blot hybridization]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 145-148 (2010). Plant Virology Unit, Division of Plant Pathology Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi-110 012, India.

ABSTRACT

A mealybug, Planococcus citri was identified as vector involved in transmission of citrus yellow mosaic virus (genus badnavirus) from citrus to citrus under glasshouse conditions in India. The vector transmit virus with acquisition access period of 24 h followed by inoculation access period of 24 h. Typical mosaic symptoms were observed on mealybug inoculated C. decumana plants similar to field symptoms. The virus was also detected in mealybugs feed on virus infected citrus seedlings for 24 h by dot-blot hybridization using 2.0 Kb cloned viral genome as DNA probe.

32. s. l. adhav, j. d. thanki, p. g. shete and y. m. kushare [Influence of organic and inorganic sources of nitrogen on growth and yield of rabi drilled fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 149-152 (2010). N. M. College of Agriculture Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari-396 450 (Gujarat), India.

ABSTRACT

Effect of organic and inorganic nitrogen sources was studied during 2007-08 on growth, yield and economics of winter fennel (Foeniculum valgare Mill.) under south Gujarat condition at the Instructional Farm, N. M. College of Agriculture, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari. Maximum seed yield and its attributes were obtained when recommended dose of fertilizer was applied through inorganic sources. Different organic sources (castor cake, neem cake and biocompost) with inorganic fertilizer 1 : 1 ratio gave higher yield than recommended dose of N through inorganic source. The higher seed yield (2047.33 kg/ha), net profit (Rs. 29237.44) and benefit : cost ratio (3.91) were obtained when recommended dose of fertilizer was applied through inorganic sources.

33. D. Vijay, M. Dadlani and V. Vashisht [Comparative studies of natural and accelerated ageing in soybean seeds]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 153-159 (2010). Division of Seed Science & Technology Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi-110 012, India *(e-mail : vijaydunna@gmail.com).

ABSTRACT

The pattern of ageing was compared under both natural and accelerated ageing conditions in two soybean cultivars and the loss of viability and different vigour parameters viz., seedling dry weight, vigour index I, release of volatile aldehydes and loss of membrane permeability were studied. All the vigour and viability parameters showed a continuous decline under both natural and accelerated ageing conditions with increased time period, but the nature of decline was different under these two ageing conditions. Significant difference was observed between the varieties under both ambient and accelerated ageing conditions for all the parameters except for seedling dry weight under ambient storage and electrical conductivity under accelerated ageing conditions. Even though a general decline was observed in different vigour and viability parameters under both ambient and accelerated ageing conditions. The overall pattern of ageing was different under these two situations concluding that the accelerated ageing did not exactly represent the natural ageing particularly for short duration of storage of one year.

34. Prabir Chakraborti [Effect of Na-salts on seedlings of sesame genotypes]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 160-165 (2010). Department of Seed Science & Technology Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia (West Bengal), India *(e-mail : prab_c@rediffmail.com).

ABSTRACT

Observation was carried out at germination and early stages of seedlings to study the behaviour of salt tolerance of nine sesame genotypes against different Na-salts with different concentrations. Results indicated that soil pH and electrical conductivity were affected positively by salt doses, but seedling growth and dry weight decreased with the doses and kinds of salt. It was also observed that the type of salt was more important with the degree of soil salinity, though mixed salt could be identified more efficient to affect seed germination as well as early seedling characters than other salts except NaCl. At seedling stage, the shoot growth was less adversely affected than root growth in saline condition. In cultivation, the white or light coloured seed should be preferred due to their better performance than black or dark coloured seed. 

35. W. B. Akanbi, A. B. Olaniyan, O. A. Olaniran, M. A. Ojo, A. S. Adeyeye and E. A. O. Ilupeju [Effect of organic and inorganic fertilizer on growth, calyx yield and quality of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 166-172 (2010). Department of Agronomy Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria *(e-mail : akanbiwasiu2001@yahoo.com).

ABSTRACT

Pot and field experiments were conducted to determine the effects of inorganic fertilizer, organic manure and combination of both on growth, calyx yield and quality of roselle. Treatments included : control no fertilizer (T1), 300 kg/ha NPK 20-10-10 (T2), 2.5 t /ha (T3), 5.0 t/ha (T4), 7.5 t/ha (T5), 10 t/ha cassava peel compost (CPC) (T6), 2.5 t/ha CPC+150 kg/ha NPK (T7), 5. 0 t/ha CPC+150 kg/ha NPK (T8), 7.5 t/ha CPC+150 kg /ha NPK (T9) and 10 t/ha CPC+150 kg/ha NPK (T10). Application of mineral NPK in combination with CPC resulted in the highest calyx yield (22.2 t/ha). Integrated use of 5.0 t/ha CPC+150 kg /ha NPK yielded 22.2 t/ha calyx which was 45% higher than yield obtained from 300 kg/ha mineral NPK. Combination of compost with NPK also increased the concentrations of essential proximate and nutritional quality of roselle calyx. This study indicated that combination of crop waste compost together with mineral fertilizer proved more efficient than either organic or inorganic fertilizer used alone in increasing yield and quality of calyx. Economic analysis favoured the use of 150 kg/ha NPK with 5.0 t/ha CPC. Therefore, this combination seemed to be optimum for good growth and high quality roselle production in the southern guinea savanna of Nigeria.

36. D. V. Pathak and R. Gera [Effect of bioinoculants on grain yield in pearl millet-wheat rotation system]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 173-175 (2010). Department of Microbiology CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

Pearl millet-wheat rotation is one of the most important components in South-West Haryana and is grown in about six lakh hectares of land in this zone. The effect of mixed biofertilizer inoculation and biocontrol agents (BCA) on pearl millet cv. HHB-67 and wheat cv. WH-283 in pearl millet-wheat rotation system at different doses of N and P was studied under field condition at CCSHAU Regional Research Station, Bawal during kharif 2004 to 2006 and rabi 2004-05 to 2006-07. In case of both pearl millet and wheat, the inculation of mixed biofertilizer either alone or in combination with BCA resulted in 3.6-19.26 and 1.8-26.3% increase in grain yield, respectively at 50, 75 and 100% RDF. But these values were low when compared with the recommended doses of fertilizer (both inoculated as well as uninoculated ones). Thus, it was concluded that 75% RDF+biomix could not replace 100% RDF in the crops under investigation. However, inoculation of mixed biofertilizer even at 100% RDF resulted in 2 to 6% increase in grain yield in both the crops tested.

37.D. V. Pathak and R. Gera [Synergistic effects of bioinoculants and chemical fertilizers in pearl millet-mustard rotation system]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 176-178 (2010). Department of Microbiology CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

The inoculation of mixed biofertilizer with and without biocontrol agents on pearl millet and mustard under pearl millet-mustard system was studied under rainfed system at CCSHAU Regional Research Station, Bawal during kharif 2004, 2005, 2006 and rabi 2004-05, 2005-06, 2006-07. In pearl millet, the per cent increase in grain yield at 100% RDF varied from 4.1 to 11.7 due to biomix inoculation and maximum grain yield of 38.13 q/ha was observed in the year 2004. Bio-control agents (BCAs) also significantly contributed to the grain yield of pearl millet in the first year of investigation, but in the subsequent years this increase was non-significant when compared with 75% RDF as control. The seed yield of Indian mustard at 100% RDF alongwith biomix was significantly higher showing 8.4 to 11.1% over its control during all the three years of investigation. Similar trends were observed in mustard to those of pearl millet when BCAs of the crop were inoculated biomix at 75% RDF. Thus, it was concluded from the present study that chemical fertilizer even at recommended doses supplemented with biomix inoculation resulted in increase in grain yield as well as soil health for sustainable agriculture.

38. R. Gera*, D. V. Pathak, Seema Mehta and K. Kukreja [Effects of genetically modified cotton (Bt cotton) on native and inoculated soil microorganisms]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 179-185 (2010). Department of Microbiology CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : gera@hau.ernet.in).

ABSTRACT

Transgenic plants are considered to be of immense importance for sustainable agriculture. Many transgenic crops such as soybean, maize, canola and cotton containing economically useful and health related genes have been developed for longer shelf life, disease resistance, herbicide resistance, insect resistance and stress resistance such as to drought or nitrogen starvation and nutritional improvement. Transgenic cotton plants expressing Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab, from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provide an effective control of certain lepidopteran insects. However, little is known about the proteins below ground expression and potential benefits of transgenic plants. In the present study, effect of Bt cotton was studied on native and inoculated microorganisms in the rhizospheric soil under field as well as pot house conditions, respectively. Marginal increase in native microbial population of non-Bt cotton compared to Bt cotton after 45 days of sowing (DAS) was observed in two different varieties RCH 134 and MRC 6301 tested. However, after 90 DAS there was decrease in microbial population and it was almost similar both in the Bt and non-Bt cotton rhizosphere. Genetically marked strains of Azotobacter (A-2), Azospirillum (J-11-12) and phosphate solubilizing bacterium (BPL-2) established better in the rhizosphere of non-Bt cotton, var. RCH 134 under pot house conditions and their population was ten times higher after 30 DAS. Increase in plant height, plant biomass, N and P uptake due to inoculation was observed at recommended dose of fertilizers both in Bt as well as in non-Bt cotton.

39. S. N. SUDHAKARA, NEELU NANGIA, H. T. KRISHNAMURTHY, FATIMA SADATULLA AND P. S. JAGADISH [Impact of selected feed additives on economics of mulberry silkworm hybrid PM × CSR2 at farmers’ field level]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 186-189 (2010). Department of Sericulture University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

A field study was undertaken at Kolar district of Srinivasapura taluk to know the impact of standardized feed additives on reeling traits of silkworm hybrid, Bombyx mori L. PM × CSR2. Silkworm hybrids were fed on mulberry shoots fortified with feed additives flour combination of horse gram+grain amaranthus (50 : 50) recorded significantly maximum cocoon yield, absolute values, absolute increase over control, highest market price of cocoon, total value realized, cost of treatment and maximum net profit with maximum returns per rupee spent, followed by CFTRI mixture as compared to unsupplemented control. However, labour cost was constant in all treatments including unsupplemented control (Rs.1400).

40. S. N. SUDHAKARA, NEELU NANGIA, FATIMA SADATULLA, H. T. KRISHNAMURTHY AND P. S. JAGADISH [Impact of standardized feed additives on reeling traits of mulberry silkworm hybrids CSR2 × CSR4 and ND7 × CSR2 (Jayalakshmi)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 190-194 (2010). Department of Sericulture University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

Among nine different flours of feed additives tested, the silkworm hybrids CSR2 × CSR4 and ND7 × CSR2 (Jayalakshmi) in combination of horse gram+grain amaranthus flour (50 : 50) recorded significantly maximum reeling traits viz., higher per cent raw silk recovery (21.45 and 21.41; 15.55 and 15.48), per cent neatness (95.58 and 95.51; 91.25 and 91.17), per cent cleanliness (97.45 and 97.36; 96.13 and 96.05), lower sericin per cent (20.23 and 20.38; 22.23 and 22.29) and higher fibroin per cent (79.75 and 79.61; 77.76 and 77.69), respectively, when provided from fourth instar upto spinning in both the hybrids.

41. S. N. SUDHAKARA, NEELU NANGIA, FATIMA SADATULLA, H. T. KRISHNAMURTHY AND P. S. JAGADISH [Enhancement of standardized feed additives on cocoon parameters of mulberry silkworm hybrids CSR2 × CSR4 and ND7 × CSR2 (Jayalakshmi)]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 195-199 (2010). Department of Sericulture U niversity of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

Late age silkworms reared on mulberry shoots fortified with flours of horse gram+grain amaranthus (50 : 50) from fourth instar onwards up to ripening once daily and alternate day produced significantly higher maximum cocoon yield, cocoon length, cocoon width, single cocoon filament length, single cocoon filament weight, bold but lesser number of cocoons per liter and reduced percentage of melted cocoons when compared to unsupplemented control.

42. H. BANERJEE AND P. K. DHARA [Evaluation of fruit-based agroforestry model for rainfed upland under red & lateritic tract of West Bengal]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 200-206 (2010). Regional Research Station (Red & Laterite Zone) Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Jhargram, Paschim Medinipur-721 507 (West Bengal), India.

ABSTRACT

An experiment was initiated during 2004 at Regional Research Station (Red & Laterite Zone), Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Jhargram, West Bengal to standardize fruit-based agroforestry model for rainfed upland under red & laterite tract of humid & sub-humid zone. The experiment involves silvicultural species (Gmelina arborea), fruit crops (sweet orange and guava) and arable crops (cowpea, groundnut, blackgram and bottlegourd). Fruit plants were planted at a spacing of 10 x 10 m. Seedlings of tree species were planted in between two fruit crops. In this way, two hectares of uplands have been developed with fruit-based agroforestry system. Both tree species and fruit plants were planted in the 3rd week of June, 2004. Broad spacing of tree and fruit crops gives an opportunity to grow number of intercrops for first few years. Four arable crops viz., cowpea, groundnut, blackgram and bottlegourd were grown under both G. arborea + sweet orange and G. arborea+guava-based agroforestry system during kharif seasons of 2005, 2006 and 2007. Experimental results revealed that tree height, bole height, diameter at breast height and volume yield of G. arborea were increased with the increasing age of tree. On an average, yield (mean of three years) of cowpea, groundnut, blackgram and bottlegourd was 1.94 & 1.86, 0.84 & 0.80, 0.72 & 0.66 and 12.92 &12.56 t/ha when intercropped under G. arborea+sweet orange and G. arborea+guava-based agroforestry system, respectively. All the four arable crops gave maximum net return under G. arborea + sweet orange-based agroforestry system. So far as different agroforestry systems are concerned, G. arborea+sweet orange+bottle gourd model gave maximum total outturn (Rs. 89,504.00) closely followed by G. arborea+guava+bottlegourd model (Rs. 87,446.00). Such sort of venture will be of multifarious utility to the farmers because it not only provides fuel wood, timber, fruits and crop produce but also increases cropping intensity, maximizes the combined income from the interrelated crop-tree-fruits-people complex over the year, enriches the soil health and last but not the least ensures ecological balance.

43. S. B. DEVARANAVADGI, S. Y. WALI, S. B. PATIL, M. B. JAMBAGI AND D. N. KAMBREKAR [Effect of planting methods on soil moisture regime, survival and dry weight of seedlings of different tree species]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 207-210 (2010). UAS Regional Agricultural Research Station, Bijapur-586 101 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Sanknal village, Bijapur district during July 2007. Soil moisture regime, survival, dry weight of seedlings and economics of different tree species were influenced by various planting methods in dry tract of northern Karnataka. Planting of tree species in crescent method recorded higher soil moisture content, dry weight and survival of seedlings (73.22 and 69.50% at 200 and 500 days after planting) followed by staggered trench method of planting. The tree species Gliricidia sepium recorded higher soil moisture content, dry weight and survival of seedlings at 200 and 500 days after planting (84.08 and 80.16%, respectively) as compared to other tree species. The staggered trench method appeared to be optimum with low cost and optimum results in terms of growth and productivity. However, none of interaction effects was found to be significant.

44. D. K. Shivrain, V. P. S. Yadav and R. S. Hooda [Correlates of sustainable rice production technology]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 211-214 (2010). CCSHAU Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Faridabad (Haryana), India.

ABSTRACT

Rice is the staple food for more than 60% of the world population. In India, rice occupies an area of 44.59 million ha. The productivity of rice in our country is lower than many other countries, namely, South Korea, Australia, Japan, USA and China, etc. In Haryana, the total area under rice was 1087 (’000/ha) with production of 242.4 (’000 tonnes) and productivity 2386 kg/ha per hectare during 1999-2000 .The present study was undertaken in a traditional rice cultivation tract of Haryana, particularly in Karnal and Kaithal districts of Haryana, from where unsustainability problems like decreasing productivity (in terms of decreasing output per unit of input) and environmental degradation were reported. These districts were selected purposively on the basis of highest area and production of rice in the state. The selected farmers were interviewed using a well structured interview schedule. Data were collected through personal interview technique.The correlation analysis results revealed that land holding, socio-economic status, education, family education, economic motivation, change proneness and attitude towards sustainability were found to have significant positive relationship with knowledge level of sustainable rice cultivation technology.

45. I. S. EGYIR AND S. Y. C. ESSAH [Promoting formal urban agricultural-based organisations in developing economies : factors that influence choice]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 215-220 (2010). Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana *(e-mail : sessah@lamar.colostate.edu).

ABSTRACT

Urban agriculture is a growing phenomenon in many developing economies. Therefore, the institutional framework that supports its growth needs to be well understood in order to boost its sustainability. A formal organization of the people engaged in urban agricultural enterprises has been called for in many developing countries, but the factors that influence people to choose this type of organization have not been adequately documented. This study uses data from a survey of 326 members of agricultural-based organizations in the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area (the largest urbanized center in Ghana) to model the choice of formal agricultural-based organizations. The results of the logit model showed that crop farmers who perceived that formal organizations reduced personal risk, increased personal sales and profits, reduced business costs, improved rate of performance and had a high level of trusted leadership were more likely to join a formal agricultural-based organization. The results showed that both tangible and intangible benefits were basic factors that motivate urban farmers to commit resources to formal organizations. Data from this study indicate that existing farmer based organizations should link up with various government and non-governmental agencies that can support them financially and technically to develop their groups into beneficial organizations.

46. Dharma Oraoan, V. K. Pandey, R. Ranjan and R. K. Singh [Effect of improved variety and spacing on niger (Guizotia abyssinica) under rainfed condition]. Crop Res. 39(1, 2 & 3) : 221-223 (2010). Birsa Agricultural University Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Chatra (Jharkhand), India.

ABSTRACT

On-farm Trials (OFTs) were conducted in late kharif 2005-06 and 2006-07 under farmers’ field of Uraili Panchayat under Hunterganj Block of Chatra district, Jharkhand. Experiment consisted of four treatments i. e. T1–Farmers’ variety (Chatki) broadcast seeding+Farmers’ dose of nutrient N40P20K5, T2–Farmers’ variety (Chatki) line sowing, R x R 30 cm+Farmers’ dose of nutrient, T3–Improved variety (Birsa Niger-1) broadcast seeding+N4OP20K5 and T4–Improved variety (Birsa Niger-1) line sowing R x R 30 cm+Farmers’ dose of nutrient N40P20K5 in 20 locations under randomized block design. The mean results of two years revealed that the highest niger yield (5.35 q/ha) was recorded from improved variety Birsa Niger-1 under 30 cm row spacing i. e. T4 with Rs. 8560/ha gross return. This treatment was significantly superior to plant height, branches per plant, number of capsules per plant and test weight to all three treatments, respectively. Improved variety under broadcast seeding was also significantly suprior to farmers’ variety under line sowing and broadcast seeding with respect to all parameters. Line sowing of farmers’ variety was significantly superior to farmers’ variety under broadcast seeding in all aspects.

47. S. S. PINJARI, T. S. BHONDAVE, J. S. Suryawanshi AND M. S. Talathi [Effect of organic manures on corn–A review]. Crop Res. 39 (1, 2 & 3) : 224-230 (2010). Agritech. School Mahatma Phule Krishi Vidyapeeth, Rahuri (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

The literature on effect of organic manure on maize crop has been well documented. In this article, efforts have been made to review the literature available on effect of organic manure on corn. The effect of organic manure was studied on growth characters, yield attributes, yield, nutrients uptake, quality characters and economics.