Volume 37, Number1, 2 & 3 (January, March & May 2009)

By | July 23, 2014

Titles of research papers/articles alongwith their abstracts.
For full text, please contact to Editor-in-chief at :
 md@cropresearch.org

1. Mohammad Reza Dadnia, SH. Lack, K. Barfipoor, H. Khosravani and A. Modhej [Effects of selenium concentration on wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 1-5 (2009). Research & Science Branch Islamic Azad University, Ahwaz, Ahwaz, Iran

ABSTRACT

Trace amounts of selenium are considered essential for proper growth and development in most organisms. However, high levels of selenium can cause adverse effects in animals as well as most plants. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) has been studied for its potential use in selenium foliar application because of its ability to accumulate relatively levels of this potentially toxic element. While much is known about selenium’s role in higher plants and the use of plants for phytoremediation, relatively little is known about the effects of selenium on developmental events and on reproductive success (e. g. seed set). This study found that wheat plants grown in 18 and 25 g/ha selenium displayed significant effect on flowering and seed yield. In particular, 18 g/ha selenium treatment resulted in plants flowering and an overall higher seed yield compared to controls at water deficit stress but in 25 g/ha selenium treatment seed yield was significantly decreased. Comparable numbers of seeds per spike were produced in selenium-treated and control plants, but seed viability was reduced in selenium-treated plants. Plant height and leaf production were also negatively affected by selenium. Results presented here also indicate that protein from wheat plants grown on high selenium does contain proper selenium (18 g/ha), which could potentially be used to human diets.

2. Elaheh Rabiei, Mahmood Khodambashi and Abdollah Ghasemi Pirbalouti [Evaluation of the effect of drought stress on seed yield and its components in oat (Avena sativaL.) cultivars]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 6-10 (2009). Department of Medicinal Plants Islamic Azad University, Shahrekord Branch, Shahrekord, P. O. Box 166, Iran

ABSTRACT

Water deficit is an important yield-decreasing factor in small-grain cereals. Drought affected crop productivity nearly as much as all other environmental factors combined. To study the effect of water deficit stress on seed yield, yield components and phenological characters in oat (Avena sativa) cultivars, two experiments at stress and non-stressed conditions (irrigation after depletion 80 and 50% of soil available water, respectively) were conducted. This study was conducted in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with 10 cultivars of oat and three replications at the research farm, Faculty of Agriculture, Shahrekord University of Iran in the years 2004 and 2005. The results obtained from this study showed that the cultivars were significantly different in most of the studied traits and their response to water deficit stress was different. The results of ANOVA for seed yield and yield components showed that the effect of year on most traits was significant, but the effect of year × cultivar interaction was not significant for most characteristics. In general, the results showed that Paser cultivar gave highest seed yield and its components in drought stressed and non-stressed conditions.

3. BASAVALINGAIAH, S. BHASKAR, J. JANARDHAN AND H. C. GIRISHA [Effect of coffee pulp effluent irrigation on yield and quality of baby corn grown on sandy clay loam in hilly zone of Karnataka]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 11-14 (2009). Department of Agronomy University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

To ascertain the effect of coffee pulp effluent on performance of baby corn, a field investigation was carried out during summer season of 2004. The study clearly indicated that treated coffee pulp effluent could be used as source of irrigation for production of baby corn. Quality of baby corn was improved under coffee pulp effluent irrigation. However, alternate irrigation with fresh water and raw effluent (98.76 q/ha) and treated effluent irrigation (77.63 q/ha) recorded moderate yield lower than fresh water irrigation (117.17 q/ha).

 

4. P. ASHOKA, S. R. ANAND, MUDALAGIRIYAPPA and R. SMITHA [Effect of macro and micronutrients with organics on growth, quality, yield and economics of Baby corn (Zea mays L.) in Tungabhadra Command Area]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 15-18 (2009). Department of Agronomy College of Agriculture, Raichur-584 101 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2005 on deep vertisol at Regional Agricultural Research Station, Raichur, Karnataka to study the effect of macro and micronutrients with organics on growth, yield, quality and economics of Baby corn on Tungabhadra Command Area. The treatments were laid out in a randomized completely block design with three replications. The data revealed that application of RDF + 25 kg ZnSO4+10 kg FeSO4+35 kg vermicompost recorded significantly higher growth parameters viz., plant height (185.5 cm), number of functional leaves (18.63), total dry matter production (300.19 g/plant) and yield attributes, Baby corn per plant, (2.83), Baby corn weight (17.40 g), yield of Baby corn (64.43 q/ha) and fodder yield (232.33 q/ha) and quality parameters viz., protein (49.76 mg/100 g) and reducing sugar (104.90 mg/100 g), over RDF alone and also on par with RDF alongwith micronutrients combined with FYM. Higher gross return (88,651), net return (68,702) and B : C ratio (3.85) were recorded with application of RDF alongwith micronutrients combined with vermicompost. It had greater impact on practical utility and acceptance of the technology.

 

5. ASHOK KUMAR [Influence of varying plant population and nitrogen levels on growth, yield, economics and nitrogen use efficiency of pop corn (Zea mays everta sturt)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 19-23 (2009). Division of Agronomy Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi-110 012, India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out at New Delhi to study the response of pop corn (Zea mays everta sturt) to different levels of plant population and nitrogen during kharif seasons of 2005 and 2006. Increasing plant population levels recorded taller plants with reduced dry weight/plant, length and girth of cobs, grains/ear and shelling (%). However, there was marked improvement of 23.5 and 40.0% in grain and 8.1 and 21.4% in stover yield with the plant population of 66,666 and 83,333 plants/ha as compared to 55,555 plants/ha, respectively. Nitrogen uptake, net return, benefit : cost ratio, nitrogen removal and nitrogen use efficiencies also showed the increasing trend with increasing plant population levels. Increasing nitrogen levels recorded taller plants with more dry weight/plant, length and girth of cobs, grains/ear and shelling (%). Similarly, there was significant improvement in grain and stover yields to the tune of 38.2, 64.9 and 82.2% and 34.7, 54.7 and 66.6% with the application of 40, 80 and 120 kg N/ha over control, respectively. The significantly highest value of net return (Rs. 42,310 and 40,870) was found with the application of 120 kg N/ha, but benefit : cost ratio increased markedly upto 80 kg N/ha. More nitrogen uptake, grain protein content, total availability and removal of nitrogen; and computed and actual residual soil nitrogen contents were recorded at higher nitrogen application rates. The positive balance in soil nitrogen was found with 0 and 40 kg N/ha. Nitrogen use efficiencies viz., ANUE, PNUE, ANR and PEN declined with increasing nitrogen levels. On the basis of two years’ experimentation, it can be concluded that for getting higher yield and net return, the pop corn should be grown with plant population of 83,333 plants/ha and fertilized with 120 kg N/ha

 

 

6. P. A. Deshmukh, A. S. Bonde, S. K. Burghate and A. S. Zape [Long term effect of organics and fertilizers on water retention and transmission properties and yield under sorghum-wheat sequence on Vertisols]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 24-27 (2009). Department of Soil Science & Agricultural Chemistry Shri Shivaji College of Horticulture, Amravati (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

The study on long term effect of organics and fertilizers on water retention and transmission properties of soil conducted at Cropping System Research at Dr. P. D. K. V., Akola revealed that application of 50% recommended NPK through fertilizers+50% N through FYM led to better improvement in the physical properties of soil viz., water retention and hydraulic conductivity. The study also revealed that the application of FYM alongwith fertilizer helped in increasing the yield of sorghum and wheat rather than the fertilizers alone. The correlations among water retention, hydraulic conductivity and yield parameters were found significant.

 

7. H. A. ESECHIE AND S. M. AL-FARSI [Performance of elite pearl millet genotypes under salinity stress in Oman]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 28-33 (2009). Department of Crop Sciences Sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 34, Al-Khod 123, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman

ABSTRACT

The performance of 30 pearl millet genotypes for forage yield and nutrient composition under saline conditions was evaluated in studies conducted in farmers’ plots located at Rumais in the Batinah region of Oman in 2004 through 2006. Based on their green forage yields (GFY), 10 genotypes, namely, IP 3616, IP 6104, IP 6109, IP 6110, IP 6112, IP19586, IP 22269, Sudan Pop III, Guerinian-4 and Dauro Genepool were selected in 2004 for further evaluation in 2005 and 2006. IP 6112 had the highest GFY in both the years, GFY being 65.7 and 84.5 t/ha in 2005 and 2006, respectively. There were no significant differences among the genotypes in leaf concentration of P, K, Ca, Mg, Na and Cl. Leaf Na concentration ranging from 2.21-3.10% appeared high. However, since no Na toxicity symptoms were observed in the leaves of any of the genotypes, it was suggested that they probably had the ability to sequester Na ions into the cell vacuoles. Generally, neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) concentrations were high in all genotypes, suggesting that dry matter intake as well as forage digestibility may be impacted negatively. However, crude protein concentration, ranging from 11.44-21.81% was considered adequate for both beef and dairy cattle in Oman. Follow-up feeding trials are needed to confirm this.

 

8. J. A. Ogunwale, J. O. Olaniyan and M.O. Aduloju [Suitability evaluation of the University of Ilorin farmland for cowpea]Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 34-39 (2009).Department of Agronomy University of Ilorin, P. M. B. 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria

ABSTRACT

The University of Ilorin farmland, situated in the southern Guinea savanna zone of Nigeria, was evaluated for its suitability for the production of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.]. Potential and actual suitability indices were calculated from raw morphological and chemical data on five pedons. Climate was not a constraint to the production of cowpea in Ilorin and its environ. Available phosphorus was a constraint in two of the five pedons studied. Aggregate potential suitability rating showed that Bolorunduro series was the most suitable for cowpea production, followed by Ilemona, Tanke and Badi series, respectively. Afon series is constrained by both drainage and texture factors.

 

9. S. S. Rathore, N. K. Pruthi and I. S. Naruka [Alleviation of sodium chloride stress by growth regulators in seedlings of mothbean [Vigna aconitifolia (Jacq.) Marechal]]Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 40-45 (2009). College of Horticulture, Mandsaur (M. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Mothbean [Vigna aconitifolia (Jacq.) Marechal] is one of the important arid legumes having important dietary component of people of arid and semi-arid tract of India and also industrial aspects. Salinity is the major barrier for crop productivity in India. An experiment conducted to test the effect of different levels of IAA and GA3 in combination with 0.10, 0.25, 0.50% NaCl salinity at seedling stage on germination, Shoot length, root length, fresh and dry weight. Germination percentage decreased with increasing NaCl salinity order. NaCl salinity also delayed the germination, root length; shoot length, fresh and dry weight of seedlings decreased with increased salinity. Both IAA and GA3 alleviated adverse effect of NaCl salinity on germination as well as germination period. It also mitigated the adverse effect of salinity on root length, shoot length fresh and dry weight of seedlings. GA3 showed high alleviation in comparison to IAA for seedling attributes

 

10. B. A. KASAR, K. R. CHAVHAN, S. U. NEMADE, G. B. MORE AND VARSHA APOTIKAR [Efficacy of different herbicides for weed control in groundnut in combination with cultural methods of weed control]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 46-48 (2009). Zonal Agricultural Research Station Vidarbha Zone, Waghapur Road, Yavatmal-445 001 (Maharashtra), India.

ABSTRACT

An experiment on weed control studies in groundnut was carried out at the university farm of Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola during kharif 2002 to evaluate the efficiency of different herbicides for weed control in groundnut in combination with cultural methods of weed control i. e. weed free check as well as two hoeings and two hand weedings at 20 and 40 DAS reduced weed population and weed dry matter but recorded higher dry pod yield.Application of aceto lactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor herbicide @ 50, 62.5, 75 and 100 g a. i./ha at 5 DAS followed by 1 H+1 HW at 35 DAS as well as ALS inhibitor herbicide at 50 g a. i.+pendimethalin 250 g a. i./ha at 5 DAS followed by 1 H+1 HW at 35 DAS for dry pod yield.

11. L. VISHALU, NAGARAJU, H. V. NANJAPPA, K. N. KALYANAMURTHY, N. DEVAKUMAR AND K. KALARAJU [Performance of hybrid maize to plant density and fertilizer levels under rainfed condition]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 49-51 (2009). Department of Agronomy University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out at Zonal Agricultural Research Station, GKVK, Bangalore during kharif season of 2006 under rainfed condition on red sandy loam soil. The results of the experiment revealed that significantly higher grain yield of 8417 kg/ha and stover yield of 10713 kg/ha was recorded in plant density of 74,074 plants/ha with 150% recommended dose of NPK fertilizers. This is because of better utilization of solar energy and also adequate nutrient supply which might have helped in better root growth to extract nutrients and moisture more efficiently from deeper soil layers and thus improving all the growth and yield characters. Higher grain yield was attributed to increase in growth and yield components viz., number of cobs/plant (1.30), cob length (17.4 cm), cob girth (8.00 cm) and 100-grain weight (26.50 g), plant height (189.9 cm), cobs dry weight (150.50 g) and total dry weight (234.50 g).

 


12. S. Avudaithai, V. Veerabadran and N. Satheeshkumar [Effect of drip fertigation regimes on nutrient uptake, nitrogen and water use efficiency and yield of cotton].Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 52-55 (2009). Department of Agronomy Agricultural College and Research Institute, Madurai-625 104 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

Field investigations were carried out at Agricultural College and Research Institute, Madurai during summer 2004 and winter 2004-05 to find out the effect of drip irrigation and fertigation regimes on nutrient uptake, nitrogen and water use efficiency and seed cotton yield of cotton. Drip irrigation regimes with wetted srea fraction (WAF), 0.5 : 1.0 : 0.6 (I4), 0.5 : 1.0 : 0.8 (I5) and 0.5 : 1.0 : 1.0 (I6) recorded increased N, P and K uptake by cotton and nitrogen and water use efficiency by cotton crop compared to drip irrigation regimes with WAF, 0.25 : 0.75 : 0.6 (I1), 0.25 : 0.75 : 0.8 (I2) and 0.25 : 0.75 : 1.0 (I3). The drip irrigation regime, I4 recorded the highest yield of 1402 kg/ha which was on par with the drip irrigation regimes, I5 and I6. The fertigation regimes of 10 equal (F1) or 10 unequal splits (F2) of N and K upto 120 DAS resulted in more sympodia, more bolls and heavier bolls and produced increased seed cotton yield

 

 

13. S. M. Nawlakhe, J. C. Patil and G. M. Kote [Productivity and economics of cotton-based intercropping system under rainfed condition]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 56-58 (2009). University Department of Agronomy Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola-444 104 (Maharashtra), India.

ABSTRACT

The present investigation was carried out during kharif season of 2006 at Agronomy Farm, Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola. The results revealed that the treatment sole cotton recorded significantly highest number of picked bolls, yield/plant, seed cotton and stalk yield than all other intercropping systems except it was at par with cotton intercropped with pigeonpea (6 : 2) in respect of yield/plant. The maximum harvest index was recorded in treatment cotton intercropped with either blackgram or greengram (2 : 1). Sole pigeonpea, cotton+blackgram (2 : 1) and cotton+greengram (2 : 1) recorded significantly highest cotton equivalent yield than rest of the treatments. The treatment cotton intercropped with either blackgram or greengram in 2 : 1 ratio produced significantly highest gross monetary, net monetary returns and land equivalent ratio. The maximum B : C ratio was observed in cotton+blackgram (2 : 1) treatment

 

 

14. A. S. Thakare, H. G. Dandale, D. N. Gawande and C. S. Tayade [Impact of organic manuring with biopesticidal control on yield and economics of rainfed cotton].Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 59-60 (2009). Department of Entomology Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out at Cotton Research Unit of Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola during kharif 2005-06 in randomized block design with three replications and nine treatments. The main objective was to study the impact of organic manuring with biopesticidal control on yield and economics of rainfed cotton. Significantly highest yield of seed cotton than all other treatments was recorded in treatment T7 (recommended dose of fertilizer + chemical control) followed by T2 (FYM + biopesticidal control). Maximum gross and net monetary return and cost : benefit ratio were obtained in T7 (recommended dose of fertilizer + chemical control). In organic manuring treatments, maximum net monetary return and cost : benefit ratio were obtained in neem cake followed by FYM and vemricompost. In all the three organic manuring treatments, the cost : benefit ratio was more in biopesticidal control as compared to chemical control, whereas in recommended dose of fertilizer, cost : benefit ratio was more in chemical control as compared to biopesticidal control

 

15. D. H. roopashree, mukund joshi, s. kamala bai, t. bhagyalakshmi and d. krishnamurthy [Preparation of enriched compost using sugarcane trash]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 61-66 (2009). Department of Agronomy University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out at Mandya District, Karnataka, India during July-December 2005 for preparation of enriched compost using sugarcane thrash, which is otherwise wasted or burnt due to its poor decomposing abilities. Results revealed that among the four types of enrichment treatments C2 (44% trash+5% cow dung+25% green manure+poultry manure) and C3 (44% trash+5% cow dung+50% yeast sludge) resulted in higher nutrients content compared to other types of enrichment treatments

 

 

16. G. N. KULKARNI, L. B. HUGAR AND V. B. KULIGOD [Impact of land degradation on cropping pattern and farm productivity in black soils of Upper Krishna Project–Some evidences on saline and waterlogged soils]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 67-71 (2009). Department of Agricultural Economics University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580 005 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

The study was carried out in Upper Krishna Project (UKP) which is one of the largest and most important major irrigation projects in Karnataka state. The cropping pattern observed was in favour of paddy in the waterlogged and saline soils where production opportunities for other light irrigated crops in these soils are either minimal or non-existent. It occupied about 39% area both in kharif and rabi/summer seasons in the waterlogged and moderate saline soils. The paddy cultivation was further restricted to only 13% of the area in severe saline soils due to high salt concentration both in kharif and rabi/summer seasons. Tendency of growing paddy on a sizable (59%) area was observed even under normal soils indicating the violation of approved cropping pattern in the study area. A large proportion of land ranging between 54 to 83% in different degraded soils was abandoned from cultivation due to increased intensity of problems. Cropping intensity was highest (187.82%) in case of normal soils as against 33.55 to 90.60% in different degraded soils. There was a drastic reduction in per hectare yield in degraded soils by 27 to 85% for different crops over normal soils

 

17. Ignacio García-Martínez and Noel Juan Arozarena Daza [A compost extract with plant growth regulator activity]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 72-77 (2009). Biochemistry Research Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Ecatepec. Av. Tecnológico y Hank González, Ecatepec de Morelos 55210, Estado de México, México

ABSTRACT

Compost samples elaborated from an institutional garbage and cow manure were used to evaluate the presence of compounds with biological activity. In an initial stage, an extract free of impurities was obtained, from which analogous compounds with similar RF values were identified and compared with plant growth regulators standards using silica gel HPTLC plates. In later stages, the biological activity of the extract was evaluated using Lepidium sativum L. root growth and seedling test. HPTLC results indicated the presence of a compound with RF value similar to auxin (Indol-3-acetic acid) one. Additionally, a bioassay showed that the extract obtained from compost samples had auxin analogous biological activity

 

18. MANJINDER KAUR BEDI, A. K. JAITLY AND KAMLA KANWAR [Studies on CO2 evolution in soils from green manures, compost and nitrogen fertilizer under aerobic and anaerobic conditions]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 78-82 (2009). CSKHPKV Hill Agricultural Research and Extension Centre, Dhaulakuan, Distt. Sirmour (H. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Incubation study was carried out to investigate the effect of moisture regime on carbon mineralization pattern from the soil amended with green manure crops, compost, fertilizer nitrogen and their different combinations at CSKHPKV Hill Agricultural Research and Extension Centre, Dhaulakuan. Cumulative CO2 evolution under aerobic as well as anaerobic followed a similar trend : green manures+50% N+compost>green manures+50% N>green manures+compost>green manures alone. Rice straw alone or in combinations evolved higher CO2 as compared to compost alone or in combinations, while rice straw+50% N/compost+recommended N showed higher CO2 evolution as compared to rice straw/compost alone. Weekly trend followed during the incubation period was different under both the conditions. During aerobic conditions decrease in second week was followed by an increase in third week and then decrease was noticed thereafter, while under anaerobic conditions increase in CO2 evolution was noticed upto four weeks which decreased upto seventh week and thereafter remained constant. Aerobic conditions showed faster carbon mineralization, while stable carbon mineralization was noticed under anaerobic conditions. Higher cumulative CO2 evolution was shown by green manures dhaincha+50% N+compost and lowest CO2 evolution was found in case of recommended N, under both the conditions.

 

19. T. BHAGYALAKSHMI, K. SUDHIR, D. H. ROOPASHREE, D. KRISHNAMURTHY, H. M. ATHEEKUR REHAMAN AND T. JAYANTHI [Response of paddy to different sources and levels of sulphur and their effect on soil properties in southern dry zone of Karnataka]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 83-87 (2009). Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out at ZARS, Mandya, Karnataka during kharif season of 2005-06 to study the effect of different sources and levels of sulphur application on growth and yield of paddy and on properties of soil. The results revealed that application of bentonite and SSP at the rate of 60 kg S/ha recorded the higher growth, yield attributes and crop yield. The performance of SSP and bentonite were on par with each other and were significantly superior to gypsum. Soil properties did not differ significantly due to different sources of sulphur. Bentonite treated plots recorded maximum available sulphur followed by SSP and gypsum.

 

20. P. P. Patel, M. M. Patel, D. M. Patel and Manish M. Patel [Effect of soil solarization on physical, chemical and biological properties of soil]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 88-94 (2009). Department of Agronomy S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar-385 506 (Gujarat), India.

ABSTRACT

The field experiments were conducted on loamy sand soil of Agronomy Instructional Farm, C. P. College of Agriculture, Sardarkrushinagar Datiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar to study the effect of soil solarization on physical, chemical and biological properties of soil during summer kharif seasons of 2003-04 and 2004-05. Soil solarization with TPE 0.025 mm for 45 days increased the soil temperature to an extent of 10.6 0C and 8.6 0C over non solarized at 5 and 10 cm depth of soil, respectively. While, among the thickness of TPE, TPE 0.025 mm for 45 days recorded higher soil temperature by 2.9 0C and 1.5 0C at 5 and 10 cm soil depth, respectively, over TPE 0.050 mm for 45 days. All SS treatments retained higher soil moisture than non solarized. TPE 0.025 mm for 45 days improved the content of available nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, Fe, Mn, and Cu, whereas organic carbon, sulphur and Zn were decreased. All SS treatments decreased the fungal, bacterial and actinomycetes population, but more reduction was noted under TPE 0.025 mm for 45 days just after SS, but subsequently there was an improvement in micro biota population after harvest of groundnut.

 

21. M. A. HASAN, R. RAY CHOWDHURY, K. K. MANDAL, D. MAJUMDAR AND A. DAS [Effect of organic and inorganic nutrients in improving flowering of mango]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 95-100 (2009). Department of Fruits and Orchard Management Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia (West Bengal), India.

ABSTRACT

An experiment with different organic and inorganic nutrients was conducted at the Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya during the year 2001 to 2005. The experiment was laid out in randomized block design with three replications. The results of applicaton of different organic and inorganic nutrients viz., (i) 50% of the recommended dose of NPK (T1), (ii) 100% of the recommended dose of NPK (T2), (iii) 50% of the recommended dose of NPK+Azospirillum inoculation (T3), (iv) 50% of the recommended dose of NPK+VAM inoculation (T4), (v) 50% of the recommended dose of NPK+Azospirillum+VAM inoculation (T5), (vi) 100% of the recommended dose of NPK+Azopirillum inoculation (T6), (vii) 100% of the recommended dose of NPK+VAM inoculation (T7), (viii) 100% of the recommended dose of NPK+Azospirillum+VAM inoculation (T8), (ix) Control (T9) of flowering behaviour of mango cv. Himsagar (25 years old trees). The highest shoot growth was recorded in the plants receiving 100% recommended doses of fertilizers alongwithAzospirillum and VAM inoculation, whereas maximum flowering (63.60%) and fruiting (71.33%) were observed in the plants supplied with 50% recommended doses of nutrients combined with Azospirillum and VAM inoculation. The nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, phenol, starch, total and reducing sugar, non-reducing sugar content, C/N ratio of shoot and leaf were determined and the number of microbial propagules in different months and of different treatments was also counted. The results indicate that application ofAzospirillum and VAM alongwith 50% recommended dose of fertilizers significantly influenced the physiological and biochemical behaviour in relation to flowering in mango cv. Himsagar. It was suggested that higher intensity of nitrogen fixing microbial colony improved the nutritional status of plants, which enhanced the growth response, flowering and related biochemical parameters.

 

22. P. TRIPATHY AND T. K. MAITY [Impact of integrated nutrient management on fruit quality and yield of okra hybrids]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 101-106 (2009).Department of Vegetable Crops

Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur-741 252 (West Bengal), India.

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were conducted in the District Seed Farm (A and B Blocks) of Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Kalyani, Nadia, West Bengal, India during summer and kharif season of 2005 to study the influence of Integrated Nutrient Management System on fruit quality and yield of okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench] hybrids. Four hybrids of okra, namely, Sun 40, Makhamalli, NOH-15 and Mahyco Bhendi No. 12 were tested under eight INM practices [Farmers’ practice, 100% Recommended dose of inorganic fertilizer (RDF) @ 150 : 100 : 80 kg NPK/ha, 50% RDF+Cow dung manure (CDM) @ 25 t/ha+Bio-fertilizer (BF),50% RDF+Neem cake (NC) @ 2.5 t/ha+BF, 50% RDF+Vermicompost (VC) @ 5 t/ha+BF, 50% RDF+CDM @ 12.5 t/ha+BF, 50% RDF+NC @ 1.25 t/ha+BF and 50% RDF+VC @ 2.5 t/ha+BF] by adopting factorial randomized block design replicated thrice. The results pooled over seasons indicated that the hybrid Makhamalli of Nunhems Seeds and NOH 15 of Nirmal Hybrid Seeds produced significantly higher total green fruit yield/plant (424.69 and 410.10 g/plant, respectively) with fruits of better quality with respect to ascorbic acid (17.95 and 17.54 mg/100 g), crude protein (21.24 and 21.18%) and lower cruder fibre content (11.45 and 11.47%) than other hybrids, irrespective of INM practices. The hybrid Sun 40 (286.04 g/plant) was identified as the poor yielder with lowest crude protein content fruits (17.34%) under INM system. Further, application of 50% RDF+BF+organic manure in the form of neem cake @1.25 t/ha or vermicompost @ 2.5 t/ha significantly not only increased per plant yield (408.54 and 402.08 g) but also quality of fruits such as higher ascorbic acid (18.23 and 18.25 mg/100 g) and crude protein content (20.97 and 20.93%), irrespective of hybrids. Similarly, the fruits of kharif okra recorded higher yield (421.82 g/plant) with quality fruits (18.39 mg/100 g ascorbic fruits, 19.95% crude protein and 11.06% crude fibre) than summer grown okra (293.39 mg/100 g, 19.40 and 12.34%, respectively).

 

23. S. Ruth Assumi, Ngangbam Piloo and J. Kabir [Storage behaviour of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) as influenced by pre-packaging in polyethylene bags]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 107-111 (2009). Department of Post Harvest Technology of Horticultural Crops Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia (West Bengal), India

ABSTRACT

Blanching pretreated (viz., hot water blanching, vapour blanching and no blanching) okra fruits were packed in consumer size polyethylene bags of 200 gauge thickness with different perforations viz., 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4% and stored in ambient condition (21.5 to 29°C and 54 to 70% RH). It was found that hot water blanching was superior to no blanching and vapour blanching. Lower the perforation rate, better was the retention of quality and polyethylene packaging with non-perforation being the best treatment. The effect of blanching treatment with perforation indicated that T2Po (Hot water blanching ´ non-perforation) was best because of least physiological loss in weight (PLW), blackening ´ and also due to good sensory score throughout the storage period upto 12 days. This was closely followed by T1Po­ (No blanching ´ non-perforation). Other treatments like T2P1 (Hot water blanching ´ 1% perforation) and T1P1 (No blanching ´ 1% perforation) were effective in retaining the marketable quality upto 6-8 days only as evident from PLW and blackening of fruits.

 

24. Somayeh Forozesh, Hassan M. Alizadeh, Mohammad A. Baghestani, Hamid R. Mashhadi and Mohsen B. Mesgaran [Egyptian broomrape (Orobanche aegyptica) control in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) with some herbicides : Greenhouse and field experiments]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 112-118 (2009). Department of Agronomy University of Tehran, Karaj, Iran

ABSTRACT

Orobanche aegyptica (Egyptian broomrape) is a parasitic weed that causes serious yield reductions in tomato crop (Lycopersicon esculentum) with no effective method being warranted for its control. Thus, in 2005-06 growing season, greenhouse and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the possibility of selective, chemical control of broomrape in tomato. Both experiments were arranged as a randomized complete blocks design with four replications. Treatments included application of chlorsulfuron at 7.5 g a. i./ha (either applied soil incorporated or through irrigation water), glyphosate at 20.5, 30.75, 41 and 61.5 g a. i./ha, rimsulfuron at 2.5, 5, 7.5, 15 and 30 g a. i./ha post-emergence, sulfosulfuron at 25, 50 and 100 g a. i./ha post emergence and trifluralin at 960 (only in greenhouse study) or 1200 g a. i./ha PPI and 1200 g a. i./ha HERB. Broomrape infested and non-infested controls were also included. Sulfosulfuron applied at 50 and 100 g a. i./ha were the most effective treatments in terms of both O. aegyptica control and particularly fruit yield. Mean per cent yield increase from these treatments was more than 100%. Glyphosate applied at 61.5 g a. i./ha (in greenhouse experiment) or at any rates (in field experiment) provided approximately the complete control of O. aegyptica but due to the crop injury fruit yield was not improved. A similar result was found for chlorsulfuron applied at 7.5 g a. i./ha HERB. Rimsulfuron applied at 7.5 g a. i./ha resulted in markedly high yields under both greenhouse and field conditions but O. aegypticacontrol was only satisfactory in field experiment.

 

25. P. K. Shrivastava, L. J. Navadia and B. N. Patel [Feasibility study on rabi onion grown in kyari lands using mini sprinklers]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 119-123 (2009).Soil & Water Management Research Unit Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari-396 450 (Gujarat), India.

ABSTRACT

A feasibility study was carried out on onion (Puna Red) during rabi season in kyari lands at Paria Farm of Navsari Agricultural University, Gujarat, during the years 2003, 2004 and 2005, using mini-sprinklers (MS), to determine the optimum fertilizer dose through mini sprinkler. Mini-sprinklers should be spaced at 3 m from each other and should be operated at 1.5 kg/cm2 pressure. Irrigations may be applied at the interval of 11 days in January, 10 days in February, eight days in March and five days in April. From the study, it was found that phosphorus (@ 50 kg/ha) and potassium (@ 50 kg/ha) should be applied at the time of sowing as basal dose and remaining N (in the form of urea) out of 100 kg N/ha, through mini-sprinkler in three equal splits at 20 days interval, first dose as basal and subsequent splits at 20 days interval, for getting better yield and economic returns. Fertilizer use efficiency for the best economically beneficial treatment T4 (100% RDN with mini-sprinkler i. e. 125 kg of N) was 157 kg/ha-kg and that of second best T3 (80% RDN with mini-sprinkler i. e. 100 kg of N) treatment was 187 kg/ha-kg and all the mini-sprinkler treatments were much above the surface irrigated control (93 kg/ha-kg). Economic analysis considering current prices and third year yield results showed the highest benefit : cost ratio of 1.51 and the second highest was in treatment T3 (1.37).

 

26. D. Krishnamurthy, Sharanappa, M. R. Umesh and C. Chandrashekar [Effect of integrated nutrient management on soil nutrient status and balance in onion production under irrigated condition]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 124-128 (2009). Department of Agronomy University of Agricultural Sciences,Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at GKVK Farm during rabi season of 2002-03 to know the effect of integrated use of organics and chemical fertilizers on onion production. Integrated use of organics and fertilizers produced significantly higher bulb yield. The P and S added through use of organics @ 250 kg N equivalent were higher than the integrated use. But NPKS uptake by the crop was higher with integrated use of organics and fertilizer. The actual balance of nutrients was substantially lower than the expected. The loss or unavailability of NPKS ranged from 23-48, 53-84, 40-51 and 44-74%, respectively. Even though the loss of nutrients was greater in sole or integrated use of organics and fertilizers. The actual NPKS was higher as a consequence of higher additions. There was nutrient depletion with the sole use of fertilizer.

 

27. M. N. KARTHIK, S. KUMAR AND G. RAVIRAJA SHETTY [Studies on correlation and path analysis in chillies (Capsicum annuum L.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 129-132 (2009). Department of Horticulture Agriculture College and Research Institute

Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Madurai-625 104 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

A study on correlation and path analysis of yield and yield contributing characters was undertaken using Line x Tester analysis. Correlation analysis indicated that the plant height, number of fruits per plant and single fruit weight had highly positive significant influence on yield per plant. Hence, selecting genotypes with more plant height, number of fruits per plant and single fruit weight will help to improve yield per plant. The intercorrelation studies suggest that there is positive association between plant height and fruits per plant, plant height and fruit length, days to first flowering and plant height, days to first flowering and capsaicin content, and single fruit weight and fruit girth. Thus, improvement aimed at one character will automatically improve its associated character. The path analysis indicated that the number of fruits per plant and single fruit weight were the principal characters responsible for yield per plant. Hence, simultaneous selection on these traits will help to improve the yield per plant.

 

28. M. N. KARTHIK, S. KUMAR AND G. RAVIRAJA SHETTY [Analysis of standard heterosis expression in chillies (Capsicum annuum L.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 133-136 (2009). Department of Horticulture Agriculture College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Madurai-625 104 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation was carried out at Department of Horticulture, Agriculture College and Research Institute, TNAU to study the standard heterosis expression in chillies. Among the hybrids, Rishikesh Orange x PKM 1 (L1x T1) recorded significant standard heterosis for eight traits viz., days to first flowering, plant height, number of primary branches per plant, number of fruits per plant, single fruit weight, fruit length, capsaicin content and fruit yield per plant. Rishikesh Orange x K 1 (L1x T3) also recorded significant standard heterosis for same number of traits viz., plant height, number of primary branches per plant, number of fruits per plant, single fruit weight, fruit length, fruit girth, capsaicin content and fruit yield per plant. It was followed by Phule-5 x K 1 (L2 x T3), KCA 120 x K 1 (L3x T3), JCA 283 x CO 1 (L7 x T5), Kiran x PLR 1(L8 x T2) and Kiran x K 1 ( L8 x T3) registered significant standard heterosis for seven characters each. Rishikesh Orange x CO 1 (L1 x T5), KCA 120 x PLR 1 (L3 x T2), KCA 145 x K 1 (L4 x T3), JCA 283 x PKM 1 (L7x T1) and Kiran x PKM 1 (L8 x T1) exhibited significant standard heterosis for six traits each.

 

29. M. N. KARTHIK, S. KUMAR AND G. RAVIRAJA SHETTY [General combining ability and specific combining ability for yield and quality traits in chillies (Capsicum annuum L.)]Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 137-143 (2009). Department of Horticulture Agriculture College and Research Institute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Madurai-625 104 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

The predominance of non-additive gene action was observed for days to first flowering, plant height, number of branches per plant, number of fruits per plant, fruit length, fruit girth, fruit yield per plant and capsaicin content. Among the parents, Rishikesh Orange (L1) was the best general combiner since, it possessed significant and desirable gca effects for eight traits followed by PLR 1 (T2) and K 1 (T3) for seven traits each. Five hybrids KCA 120 x PLR 1, KCA 145 x PKM 1, Kadayanallur Local x PLR 1, OPV 1 x K 2 and Kiran x PLR 1 were identified as the best hybrids based on sca effect for improvement of yield and quality traits. Hybrids Rishikesh Orange x K 1, Kadayanallur Local x PKM 1, Kadayanallur Local x K 1 and Kiran x K 1 can be recommended for improvement of fruit length and hybrids OPV 1 x PLR 1 (L6 x T2) and Kiran x K 2 (L8 x T4) for fruit girth through recombination breeding since the parents possess significant gca effect and its corresponding hybrid with non-significant sca effect.

 

30. K. MALARVIZHI, V. PONNUSWAMI, M. KAVINO AND B. SENTHAMIL SELVI [Effect of growth promoters on growth and yield of paprika cv. Kt-Pl-19]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 144-147 (2009). Faculty of Horticulture Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

Paprika is one of the most important value added spices of the world. The quality of paprika is determined by the colour it holds. In pre-harvest treatments, different organic and inorganic growth promoters were applied as foliar sprays in cv. Kt-Pl-19. From the investigation, it could be inferred that the pre harvest spray of panchagavya at 2.0% had positive effect on plant growth and yield. The plausible reason for this acceleration of crop growth might be due to the increased content of nitrogen, the chief constituent of protein, essential for the formation of protoplasm, which leads to cell division and cell enlargement.

 

31. Y. MADHAVI, P. VEERANNA GOUD, K. MALLA REDDY AND A. SAIDULU [Effect of different levels of vermicompost, castor cake, poultry manure and biofertilizers on growth and yield of Indian spinach (Beta vulgaris var. benghalensis Hort.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 148-151 (2009). Department of Horticulture

Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Hyderabad-500 030 (Andhra Pradesh), India

ABSTRACT

An experiment on Indian spinach (Beta vulgaris var. benghalensis Hort.) was carried out during 2006 at college farm, College of Agriculture, ANGRAU, Hyderabad to determine the effect of different levels of vermicompost, castor cake, poultry manure and biofertilizers on growth and yield. The investigation clearly indicated that higher growth parameters and leaf yield was recorded with the application of recommended dose of fertilizers (80N : 40P : 50K kg/ha) and were on a par with poultry manure 8 t/ha+Azospirillum (2 kg/ha)+Phosphorus solubilising bacteria (2 kg/ha) than control (No manures, biofertilizers and inorganic fertilizers).

 

32. R. S. RANA [Response of irrigation on broccoli yield under low hills sub-tropical conditions of Himachal Pradesh]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 152-153 (2009). CSK HPKV Hill Agricultural Research & Extension Centre Dhaulakuan-173 001, Sirmour (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted for two years at Hill Agricultural Research & Extension Centre, Dhaulakuan during winter seasons of 2006-07 and 2007-08 to study the response of number of irrigations and amount of applied water on broccoli crop. Highest broccoli yield of 161.40 q/ha was recorded with 10 irrigations, each irrigation of 5 cm depth at an interval of 14 days. The highest field water use efficiency of 3.228 q/ha-cm was obtained for the treatment resulting in highest broccoli yield and it decreased subsequently with the increase in number of irrigations

 

33. Peddi Laxmi, M. Pratap and S. Amarender Reddy [Variability studies in yellow coloured chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora L.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 154-157 (2009). Department of Horticulture Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Hyderabad-500 030 (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The present study was carried out to evaluate seven chrysanthemum genotypes for vegetative and floral characters during 2005-06 in Hyderabad conditions of Andhra Pradesh. Analysis of variance revealed significant difference among the genotypes for all the characters. Phenotypic and genotypic coefficient of variation was high for suckers per plant (67.76 and 67.08), yield for plant (49.05 and 48.09) and number of flowers per plant (47.05 and 46.72). While, high heritability with high genetic advance was observed for traits like suckers per plant (136.78 and 97.99), yield per plant (100.18 and 98.89), number of flowers per plant (95.56 and 96.71), number of branches per plant (67.48 and 96.71) and duration of flowering (51.86 and 98.02) showing additive gene effect. Among the different cultivars, Basanthi, Silper and Raichur with relatively improved vegetative growth characters significantly contributed for recording subtle increase in flower yield.

 

34. s. m. nawlakhe, d. d. mankar and d. j. jiotode [Performance of basmati type scented rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars under different dates of transplanting in eastern Vidarbha]Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 158-160 (2009). Agronomy Section Dr. P. D. K. V. College of Agriculture, Nagpur (M. S.), India.

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted during the three kharif seasons at NARP, Sindewahi to decide the optimum time of transplanting for three basmati type varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L.) viz., Pusa basmati, Kasturi and Haryana basmati. The rice crop transplanted on 15 July gave the highest grain yield (3043 kg/ha). It was significantly more than that given by the crop transplanted on 30 July and 15 August. Transplanting on 30 July and 15 August reduced the grain yield by 25.12 and 98.24%, respectively. Pusa basmati cultivar performed well and gave significantly higher yield over Kasturi and Haryana basmati rice. In interaction Pusa basmati planted on 15 July gave significantly higher yield and was at par with other two varieties planted on same date. Under 15 days delay, Pusa basmati did not reduce yield significantly.

 

35. S. ARULSELVI, K. MOHANASUNDARAM AND B. SELVI [Genetic analysis of grain quality characters and grain yield in pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.]].Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 161-167 (2009). Department of Millets, Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

Pearl millet is a staple food for a large number of people in drier regions of Africa and Asia. Although the progress had been made for increased yield in pearl millet, attention should be paid on improvement of nutritional quality characters with reduced anti-nutritional compound. In the present study, estimation of grain quality characters was carried out in pearl millet grains which included nutritional quality characters viz., starch, crude protein, crude fat, calcium, phosphorus, iron and zinc and an anti-nutritional compound called phytate phosphorus. Genetic analysis of grain quality characters and grain yield of pearl millet were carried out following Line x Tester genetic mating design in order to assess the combining ability of parents and hybrids and to understand the nature of gene action. Analysis of variance exhibited significant differences for all grain quality characters and grain yield of pearl millet. In the present study, non-additive gene action was found to be significant in the expression of all the recorded characters in pearl millet. This indicated that recurrent selection would be more appropriate breeding method for the improvement of these characters. None of the parents as well as hybrids was found to be significant for all grain quality characters and grain yield in pearl millet

 

36. Sameer S. Bhagyawant, Nidhi Srivastava and K. K. Koul [Diversity in chickpea germplasm and its wild relatives based on seed protein profiles]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 168-173 (2009). School of Studies in Biotechnology Jiwaji University, Gwalior-474 011 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Thirteen accessions of cultivated Cicer arietinum L. and two wild Cicer species from global collections of chickpea were evaluated for total seed storage protein so as to determine the extent of genetic diversity using SDS-PAGE. A total of 147 polypeptide bands were scored and identified amongst these taxa. The major such components of all species were in the molecular weight range of 94.4 to 14.3 kDa, with variation in relative mobility values. A low level of genetic diversity was observed among the genotypes originating from diverse global sources; however, those from Turkey and Syria showed the highest variation in seed protein electrophoretic patterns. Amongst Cicer species studied, wild Cicer bijugum came out as an out group. That the genotypes from the same geographical origin were somehow related by descent and had similar polypeptide patterns has been discussed in the present study.

 

37. d. p. b. jyothula and s. b. guttala [Combining ability analysis for seed yield and for some quantitative characters in field pea (Pisum sativum L.)]Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 174-180 (2009). Allahabad Agricultural Institute–Deemed University, Allahabad-211 007 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Combining ability studies were conducted in 10 x 10 diallel set (excluding reciprocals) in field pea to isolate the desirable parents and F1 cross combinations for seed yield and some quantitative characters. The analysis of variance for combining ability revealed that gca and sca variances were highly significant. The sca variances were predominant in comparison to gca variances for all the characters. This indicated that there was greater contribution of non-additive gene action in expression of these characters. The parents KPMR-660, DMR-44, IPF-26 and KPMR-663 were good combiners for seed yield per plant, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod and plant height. The F1 cross combinations KPMR-615 x DMR-44, KPMR-615 x KPMR-660 and DMR-44 x IPF-26 had significant desirable sca effects for seed yield per plant.

 

38. S. SARAVANAN, K. KOODALINGAM AND S. HARI RAMAKRISHNAN [Application of fluorescent microscopic technique to interpret the pistils of diploids and tetraploids ofGossypium species]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 181-182 (2009). Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

Self pollen pistils of six diploid genotypes (K 10, K 11, PA 255, DLSA 8, DL8A 16 and TKA 9410), three tetraploids (MCU 5, Sahana and MCU 12) and cross pollinated pistils of direct combination of above parents were collected at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24 and 36 h after pollination fixed in 6 : 3 : 1 (ethanol, chloroform, acetic acid) at 4-10°C for 24 h. The softening of the pistil of diploid parents was optimum at 12N and 10N NaOH for 6 and 8 h duration, respectively, besides the tetraploids had 10N NaOH for 10 h as optimum. The optimum staining and better fluorescence were obtained when 0.25% aniline blue was dissolved in 0.1N K3PO4 and kept for 10 h for both diploid and tetraploid

 

39. Mohammad Reza Dadnia, Sh. lack and p. borun [Salinity stress damages on antioxidant capacity in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 183-185 (2009). Research and Science Branch Islamic Azad University, Ahwaz, Ahwaz, Iran

ABSTRACT

The mechanisms of increased sensitivity to Na with selenium in salt sensitive rapeseed plants under salinity were investigated. When the plants were affected by 200 mM NaCl, MDA content in without selenium treatments significantly decreased and the thelakoides and its membrane were destructed. However, any indications of oxidative damage were not observed in selenium treatments, even though Na content in the without selenium treatments was comparable with selenium treatments. In selenium treatments, the capacity to scavenge H2O2 was lower than the without selenium treatments due to increase in the constitutive levels of ascorbate peroxidase. In addition, the activities of antioxidant enzymes except superoxide dismutase increased after 48 h of NaCl exposure. In contrast, the activities of catalase and glutathione reductase in without selenium treatments decreased. These results suggest that the capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen species decreased with selenium, thus the selenium treatments suffered severe damages by Na than without selenium treatments.

 

40. a. c. khote, v. w. bendale, s. g. bhave and p. p. patil [Genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance in some exotic genotypes of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 186-191 (2009). Department of Agricultural Botany Dr. B. S. K. K. V. College of Agriculture, Dapoli, District Ratnagiri (Maharashtra), India

ABSTRACT

Thirty exotic groundnut genotypes collected from National Research Centre for Groundnut, Junagarh, Gujarat were used to study their performance, genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance for yield and yield contributing characters. Significant variations were observed for all the characters in all the genotypes used in the experiments. Higher phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variations were observed for pods/plant, pod length, number of kernels/plant, kernel yield/plant, fodder/plant, harvest index and pod yield/plant. Characters like days to flowering, pod length, kernel length, 100-pod weight and dry matter/plant showed high heritability. The highest genetic advance as percentage of mean was recorded for kernel yield/plant, fodder/plant, harvest index and pod yield/plant.

 

41. V. B. Darji, S. K. Dixit, N. M. Patel and B. K. Bhatt [Removing spatial variability from field experiment data–A case study on Nagli (Elusine coracana L.) yield trial].Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 192-194 (2009). Department of Agricultural Statistics Anand Agricultural University, Anand-388 110 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : vbdarjee@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

Traditional analysis for blocked designs often does not account for spatial variability (Besag and Kempton,1986). The present study was aimed at comparing analysis of variance (RCBD) method with two nearest neighbour (NN) methods. Grain yield data from AVTE on Nagli conducted at the Muvaliya Farm, Dahod with three replications were utilized for the purpose. The NN methods were found better as compared to usual analysis of variance method, on the basis of test of significance (F ratio) and lower coefficient of variation. Thus, it is advisable to follow NN methods of analysis for improving precision of the estimates when CV (RCBD) exceeds 12-15%.

 

42. H. A. ESECHIE, S. A. AL-HINAI AND A. HADJ-HASSAN [Evaluation of genetic diversity in local Omani alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) germplasm with RAPD markers].Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 195-202 (2009). Department of Crop Sciences Sultan Qaboos University, P. O. Box 34, Al Khod 123, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman *(e-mail : humes@squ.edu.om)

ABSTRACT

Genetic diversity in 15 alfalfa accessions was investigated at the DNA level with the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Seeds of indigenous alfalfa accessions were collected from different regions in Oman and sown under field conditions at Sultan Qaboos University Experiment Station in Muscat. Bulked samples of genomic DNA from 24 alfalfa plants per accession were used as templates in polymerase chain reaction with different random primers to produce RAPD patterns. Using eight RAPD primers, 70 bands were scored as present or absent across the accessions. Genetic identity between accessions ranged from 0.64 to 0.94. The highest level of genetic diversity was between Ibri and Hamra, whereas the lowest level was between Manah and Sur. The dendogram constructed from cluster analysis showed seven clusters encompassing 14 accessions. Sohar did not group directly with other accessions. Ibri and Dank were tightly clustered and formed a distinct branch on the dendogram.

 

43. chanchal singh and m. n. lal [Bioefficacy of plant extracts against mustard aphid, Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.) in Brassica oilseed crop]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 203-206 (2009). Department of Entomology N. D. University of Agriculture & Technology, Faizabad (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The bioefficacy test of plant extracts carried out under field condition for two consecutive seasons i. e. rabi 2005-06 and 2006-07 against mustard aphid, Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.) revealed that neem formulations such as neem seed kernel extract @ 5%, neem leaf extract @ 5% and neem oil @ 2% were found more effective against mustard aphid than eucalyptus leaf extract @ 5% and fennel seed extract @ 5%. However, none of the plant extracts was found superior over synthetic organic insecticides such as oxydemeton-methyl 25 EC @ 0.025% and cypermethrin 25 EC @ 0.002%.

 

44. C. GOPALAKRISHNAN AND V. VALLUVAPARIDASAN [Seed-borne microflora associated with rice seeds in Tamil Nadu, India]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 207-209 (2009).Department of Plant Pathology Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore–641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India *(e-mail : pc_gopal@yahoo.co.in)

ABSTRACT

A total of 287 seed samples consisting of 20 cultivars were obtained from different parts of Tamil Nadu during an extensive survey and were used for testing their health status. Totally eight genera of fungi viz., Alternaria, Aspergillus, Bipolaris, Chaetomium, Curvularia, Fusarium, Sarocladium and Trichoderma comprising 12 species were found to be associated with the seed samples. Among them, the most predominant one was Bipolaris oryzae which was associated with 58.89% seed samples, followed by Alternaria padwickii (52.96%), Curvularia (44.60%), Alternaria tenuis (37.63%) and Sarocladium oryzae (26.83%).

 

45. S. K. MEHTA AND M. S. BENIWAL [Identification of sources of multiple disease resistance in barley]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 210-212 (2009). Department of Plant Pathology CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India

ABSTRACT

One hundred and twenty-four barley entries were screened for genetical resistance against yellow rust, leaf rust and covered smut diseases under artificial epiphytotic conditions in the field during 2005-06 and 2006-07 crop seasons at Barley Breeding Research Area, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar. Among these, 19 entries were resistant to both the rusts, 11 entries resistant to leaf rust and covered smut diseases; 47 entries resistant to yellow rust and covered smut diseases. Only eight cultivars/entries viz., BH-04-07, BH-05-49, BH-05-61, BH-05-65, HBL-113, K-551, K-792 and RD-2503 exhibited multiple disease resistance against yellow rust, leaf rust and covered smut diseases.

 

46. B. MAHESHA, P. V. PATIL AND B. NANDINI [Identification of multiple disease resistance sources in soybean]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 213-216 (2009). Department of Plant Pathology University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India

*(e-mail : maheshkantha100@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is an important oilseed crop of the world. Diseases play a major role in yield reduction (Prasad, 2002). Hence, an attempt was made to screen the 204 soybean genotypes against the major diseases both under field and laboratory conditions as one of the management strategies to know their multiple disease resistance nature and the results revealed that only one genotype (EC-241780) against rust and powdery mildew, two genotypes [Birsasoya-1 and JS (SH) 98-22] against anthracnose, powdery mildew and purple seed stain, one genotype [JS (SH) 98-21] against anthracnose, powdery mildew and bud blight, one genotype (Lee) against anthracnose, purple seed stain and bacterial pustule, seven genotypes (DS 98-14, DS-2001, EC-325100, KHSb-2, MACS-708, PS-564 and VLS-64) against powdery mildew, purple seed stain and bud blight, 24 genotypes against powdery mildew and purple seed stain, two genotypes (Himso-1597 and PK-472) against powdery mildew, bacterial pustule and bud blight, four genotypes against powdery mildew and bacterial pustule, 47 genotypes against powdery mildew and bud blight, 12 genotypes against purple seed stain and bud blight and three genotypes (MACS-450, MAUS-681 and PS-1092) against bacterial pustule and bud blight showed multiple disease resistant reaction.

 

47. B. A. BELGE AND P. R. PADGHAN [Studies on seed-borne nature of fruit rot complex of chilli]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 217-220 (2009). Department of Plant Pathology Dr. Panjabrao Deshmukh Krishi Vidyapeeth, Akola-444 104 (M. S.), India

*(e-mail mr.pacific001@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Fungi were isolated by blotter paper method and agar plate method as untreated and pre-treated seed of various cultivars of chilli (Capsicum annuum L.). Among them, pre-treated seed resulted in less incidence of seed-borne fungi (9.33%), whereas (15.16%) in untreated seed. In components, seed coat of 25% and embryo 20% seeds carriedColletotrichum dematium infection. In transmission studies, it was found that the fungus transmitted from seed coat and embryo into seedling and caused diseases in mature plants and reduced the germination. It was proved that C. dematium was transmitted through seed to plant

 

48. Mohammad Reza Dadnia, Sh. lack, y. pishbin and a. modhej [Ecophysiological effects of rye grass (Lolium rigidum L.) and wild oat (Avena ludoviciana L.) on yield and yield components in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 221-224 (2009). Research and Science Branch Islamic Azad University, Ahwaz, Ahwaz, Iran *(e-mail : rezadadnia@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

Diversification and continuous cropping have largely been a consequence of soil moisture saved through the adoption of conservation tillage. Consequently, weed communities have changed and, in some cases, become resistant to commonly used herbicides, thus increasing the complexity of managing weeds. The main plots contain cutivars in two levels and sub-plots contain rye grass and wild oat with 0, 25 and 50 density. Utilizing the principle of varying selection pressure to keep rye grass and wild oat communities off balance has reduced weed densities, minimized crop yield losses, and inhibited adverse community changes towards difficult-to-control species. Varied selection pressure was best achieved with a diverse cropping system where crop seeding date, perennation, and species and herbicide mode of action and use pattern were inherently varied. Approaches to cropping systems, including balancing rotations between cereal and broadleaf crops, reducing herbicide inputs, organic production, and the use of cover crops and perennial forages, are discussed in light of potential systems-level benefits for weed management.

 

49. Mohammad Reza Dadnia, Sh. lack and n. khademifar [Water deficit induced senescence and its relationship to selenium in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during grain filling]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 225-228 (2009). Research and Science Branch Islamic Azad University, Ahwaz, Ahwaz, Iran

ABSTRACT

Remobilization and transfer of elements in vegetative tissues to the grains in monocarpic plants require the initiation of whole plant senescence. However, mechanisms by which plant senescence promotes remobilization of assimilates are rather obscure. This study examined the relationship between the senescence induced by water deficits and Se remobilization during grain fill. Three winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) Chamran, Karkhe and Yavarus were treated with two levels of selenium (0 and 18 g/ha) and two levels of soil moisture (well-watered and severe water deficit). Results showed that water deficit enhanced the senescence by accelerating loss of leaf area index and chlorophyll and increasing lipid peroxidation. The elevated Se level correlated with the degree of earlier leaf senescence, the selenium partitioning into grains, and remobilization. The activities of biochemical markers in leaf were also enhanced by water deficits at the mid stage of grain fill. Our results suggest that the senescence and remobilization promoted by water deficits during grain fill are coupled processes in wheat, and elevated Se concentration may play a regulative role.

 

50. mohammad reza dadnia, shahram lack and f. nejat [Regulation of antioxidant enzymes activity by water deficit in maize (Zea mays L.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 229-233 (2009). Research and Science Branch Islamic Azad University, Ahwaz, Ahwaz, Iran

ABSTRACT

Antioxidant enzymes play an important role in the response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. We studied the expression patterns and enzyme activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and super oxidedismutase (SOD) under water deficit and Se-foliar conditions from maize leaves. We found the high resistance in maize plants. Based on their nucleotide retain, SOD and GPX were fixed to leaf area duration (LAD) and yield. Both enzymes showed the specific activity with affected selenium. Selenium application was performed to examine the activity of SOD and GPX in maize (Zm). SOD and GPX were upregulated in response to water-deficit. Moreover, GPX was mainly expressed in leaf tissues, whereas SOD was primarily observed in leaf and stem tissues. The GPX activity increased in leaves of maize with affected selenium in flowering stage in response to water-deficit stress. Furthermore, it appeared that GPX and SOD were not post-transcriptionally regulated in maize. These results suggest that GPX and SOD may play a role in the water-deficit response in selenium foliar application.

 

51. PAYAM MOAVENI [Evaluation of drought stress on some physiological aspects and antioxidant enzymes in sorghum]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 234-238 (2009).Islamic Azad University of Shahr-e-Qods, Shahr-e-Qods, Iran

ABSTRACT

Drought stress is a wide spread problem limiting productivity of crops. Sorghum is particularly resistant to drought stress during different stages. Three varieties of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench have been used to study the effect of water stress on antioxidant enzymes. Levels of stress were : normal-watered, medium stressed and high stressed in a sandy loam soil to determine the effects on enzymatic antioxidant, membrane permeability and leaf water content. The results showed high drought stress creating more serious effects on sorghum. Compared with normal irrigation, drought stress significantly changed the relative water content (RWC) compared with normal stage and changed significantly the realtive conductivity (RC) (P<0.05) of the leaves; however, high stress significantly decreased (P<0.01) the leaf RWC and increased (P<0.01) membrane permeability (Leaf relative conductivity). Particularly at flowering stage furthermore, under complete drought stress, antioxidant enzyme activities declined significantly (P<0.01) for super oxide dismutase (SOD) the eighth leaf stage under high stress for peroxides (POD) the eighth leaf stage under high stress and for catalase (CAT) during flowering stage meanwhile, membrane lipid per oxidation (measured as malon dialdehyde content) significantly increased (P<0.01) in all stages.

 

52. D. DHANAVEL AND M. GIRIJA [Effect of EMS, Des and SA on quantitative traits of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (l.) Walp.] in M1 generation]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 239-241 (2009). Department of Botany Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (Tamil Nadu), India

ABSTRACT

Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] variety CO 6 was exposed to varying doses of chemical mutagens. Optimum doses of 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5% of EMS; 0.05, 0.06 and 0.07% of DES and 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05% of SA for 6 h were applied to 200 seed samples of each genotype. Screening of the M1 generation revealed that the mutagenic treatments induced morphological and yield parameters in the genotype. Morphological and yield characters recorded significant reduction. Significant variation among cowpea cultivars was observed for seed germination, seedling survival, days to first flower, plant height, number of clusters/plant, number of pods/plant, number of seeds/plant, number of leaves/plant, 100-seed weight and seed yield per plant showed variability for both concentration of mutagens as well as cultivars.

 

53. Ibrahim M. Rawashdeh, Nasri I. Haddad and Ahmed Amri [Morphological diversity among and within populations of a medicinal plant (Achillea fragrantissima) collected from different regions of Jordan]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 242-254 (2009). Biotechnology Unit National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension (NCARE), P. O. Box 639. Baq’a, Jordan

ABSTRACT

Achillea fragrantissima species is a medicinal plant species found naturally in different regions in Jordan. This species and its natural habitats are exposed to severe degradation due to over-exploitation, over-grazing and agricultural encroachment. The study was conducted to evaluate the diversity of populations of A. fragrantissima collected from 15 monitoring areas in Jordan using eight morphological and agronomic traits. The results revealed the presence of a wide range of variability among and within studied Achilleapopulations. The high variability was recorded for days to flowering (Shoubk 3, Ma’an 3 and Mwaqqar 1), plant height (Shoubak 2 and Ma’an 1) and number of branches (Shoubak3 and Ma’an3). Lines and populations with tall plants and early in flowering should be selected for cultivation to allow high leaves and flowers dry yields. Cluster analysis showed clear differences between populations from different regions. Each of Shoubak 2, 3, Ma’an 1, 2 and Mwaqqar 1, 2, 3 populations formed separate groups. These findings call for the necessity of stratified sampling the remaining populations for ex situ conservation in national genebanks and for establishing several areas for protection and management of different populations to ensure effective in situ conservation. This study has also shown the possibility of cultivation of this species for income generation for local communities and for reducing the loss of the wild populations caused by collecting the plants under natural habitats.

 

54. Mohammed K. Al Rifaee, Nasri I. Haddad* and Talal Aburjai [Status of diversity and conservation of Hypericum triquetrifolium (Guttiferae) in Jordan]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 255-265 (2009). Department of Horticulture and Field Crops University of Jordan, Amman 11942, Jordan

ABSTRACT

The study covered three regions in north, center and south of Jordan, each of which includes two areas with multi sites, collectively totalled 27 wild sites. The aims were to assess the diversity status of Hypericum triquetrifolium in the natural habitats and to conserve the seeds. In 2005 and 2006, transect quadrate method was used to determine species count, percentages, richness, evenness, abundance, frequency, Shannon diversity index, habitats and threats to diversity. Investigations revealed that H. triquetrifolium had a wide adaptability to varied ecologies. The plant explored from arid to semi-humid areas (176 to 582 mm), growing in diverse environments (mountainous, plains, road side, cultivated fields, and valley bottom) and in varied altitude (341 to 1577 masl). Sites were threatened mostly by soil cultivation and grazing, reflected by vegetation disappearance or by annual variation of the low diversity values (0 to 1.02), absence and/or newly recorded species and percentages of repeated species (20 to 77%). Representative herbarium specimens and seeds of H. triquetrifolium from each site were conserved. As a medicinal plant, H. triquetrifolium needs to be considered as a priority species for research and development at the national, regional and international levels.

 

55. M. Sudha, Balakrishna Gowda and A. N. Balakrishna [Influence of different AM fungi on the growth of Arabica coffee (Sarchimor) seedlings in the nursery*]. Crop Res.37 (1, 2 & 3) : 266-273 (2009). Division of Plant Pathology Coffee Research Station Central Coffee Research Institute, Chikmagalur District-577 117 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

A nursery experiment was conducted to study and find out the effect of inoculation of different arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on the growth and nutrient uptake by coffee seedlings. The observations indicated that inoculation of Glomus mosseae significantly increased the shoot length, total dry weight of the plants, enhanced the AM colonization of roots to the maximum of (59.38%) compared to the uninoculated control plants (45.00%). Enhanced total P uptake, increased acid phosphatase activity in the rhizosphere soils was also observed. Based on these enhanced growth parameters Glomus mosseae was found to be the best AM symbiont for inoculating coffee in the nursery. In general, the results indicated that the use of this efficient AM fungi in coffee nursery may enhance the growth and vigour of the coffee seedlings significantly.

 

56. C. T. Subbarayappa, U. D. Bongale, N. Srinivas and B. R. Jagadeesha [Study of soil fertility and nutrient profiles of mulberry in different geographical areas of Karnataka and their correlation]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 274-281 (2009). Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry College of Agriculture, V. C. Farm Mandya-571 405 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

Studies were conducted with a view to understand the variability of soil fertility and leaf nutrient status of mulberry gardens in different geographical locations of Karnataka. Total number of 105 farmers mulberry gardens from traditional and non-traditional areas of Karnataka was covered. The soil and leaf samples collected were analyzed for major, secondary and micronutrients to study the fertility status and nutrient profiles in the mulberry leaf. The lower values of organic carbon in the soils of Kolar and Bangalore area, phosphorus content in the soils of Gulbarga and Raichur area and lowest values of zinc content were recorded in soils of Gulbarga area. Significantly higher zinc content was recorded in mulberry leaf of Uttara Kannada area. Available soil P content significantly correlated with Mn and Cu content of the mulberry leaf in Kolar and Bangalore area and Cu content of the mulberry leaf in Gulbarga and Raichur area. Available zinc content significantly correlated with Mn and Cu content of mulberry leaf in Kolar and Bangalore area and positively correlated with leaf Ca and Fe content of Gulbarga and Raichur area. Kolar and Bangalore areas are considered as potential for mulberry cultivation in view of the comparatively more balanced and moderate nutrient status of soil and leaf.

 

57. P. VENKATARAMANA, B. NARASIMHA MURTHY, J. V. KRISHNA RAO AND C. K. KAMBLE [Studies on the integrated effect of organic manures and Panchagavya foliar spray on mulberry (Morus alba L.) production and leaf quality evaluation through silkworm (Bombyx mori L.) rearing]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 282-289 (2009).Research Extension Centre Central Silk Board, Vikarabad-501 101 (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A study was carried out as field experiment in three years old mulberry garden in black cotton soils at Research Extension Centre, Central Silk Board, Vikarabad during 2006-08 for 10 crops to evaluate the impact of different combinations of organic manures viz., farm yard manure (FYM), vermicompost (VC), composted poultry manure (CPM) and green leaf manure (GLM) and 3% Panchagavya foliar spray (PFS) on mulberry leaf and silkworm cocoon production. The results revealed that application of organic manures and 3%Panchagavya foliar spray significantly improved the mulberry leaf yield and its yield attributes and silkworm larval and cocoon characters. The recommended dose of NPK through chemical fertilizers alongwith the 3% organic foliar spray of Panchagavya registered maximum leaf yield (71,500 kg/ha/year), yield attributing components viz., height of the plant (189.00 cm) and height of the shoot (158.00 cm) followed by 50% N through vermicompost+50% N through green leaf manure with 3% Panchagavya foliar spray. The other yield attributing characters viz., number of branches per plant (12.00), number of leaves per plant (142.00) and weight of leaves per plant (1.200 kg) as well as leaf quality parameters viz., leaf moisture content (73%) and leaf moisture retention capacity (88%) increased with 50% N through vermicompost+50% N through green leaf manure (P1T6) followed by RDF NPK through fertilizers (P1T7), which were insignificant with each other. However, all the parameters in silkworm viz., reduction in larval duration (25.29 days), increase in larval weight (50.00 g), ERR by number (9840) and weight (18.00 kg), single cocoon weight (1.985 g), single shell weight (0.327 g) and shell ratio (18.80%) were improved by the treatment P1T6 followed by 50% N thorugh CPM+50% N through GLM with 3% Panchagavya foliar spray and RDF NPK through fertilizer with 3% Panchagavyafoliar spray.

 

58. N. MANOHAR REDDY, K. RADHIKA AND L. V. SUBBA RAO [Studies on inheritance of seed storability in maize (Zea mays L.)]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 290-295 (2009).Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Rajendranagar-500 030, Hyderabad (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The seeds of 12 parents and 36 hybrids of maize with 9% initial moisture content treated with calcium oxychloride @ 3 g / kg seed were stored in cloth bags and 700 mm guage polythene bags alongwith untreated seed under ambient conditions for two years. Samples were drawn at bimonthly intervals and germination was evaluated after seven days till they retained germination upto minimum seed certification (90%). The results indicated that the polythene bag was a better storage container compared to cloth bag. The seed treatment with calcium oxychloride @ 3 g/kg seed extended the storability upto four months in cloth bag and two months in polythene bag. The parents and hybrids differed significantly for storability indicating the influence of genotype on seed longevity. The inheritance of seed storability of parents having good and moderate storability was dominant over parents with poor storability.

 

59. A. S. Yadav and R. C. Sharma [Front line demonstration : Need for stability and sustainability in cotton production system]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 296-298 (2009). JNKVV Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Harda-461 331 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The present study was carried out at JNKVV, Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Harda, Madhya Pradesh from 2006 to 2008. The 50 demonstrations were conducted on an area of one acre each in two selected villages. The results revealed that the higher values of growth and yield were recorded when crop was grown under recommended practices as compared to farmers’ practice. The performance of cotton hybrid RCH-2 Bt showed higher average seed cotton yield, net return and benefit : cost ratio in comparison to local check and also more than 39% increased yield over local check. The seed cotton yield recorded through technology interventions provided the base for yield advantage due to adoption of high yielding hybrids/varieties as well as production and protection technology.

 

60. A. T. Krishnamurthy, V. B. Sanath Kumar, R. Manjunath and N. Arun [Information seeking and marketing behaviour of banana growers in hill zone of Karnataka]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 299-302 (2009). Department of Agricultural Extension College of Horticulture, Mudigere, Chikmagalur-577 132 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

The study was conducted during the year 2007, in Mudigere and NR pura taluks of Chikmagalur district, with the objective to know the motivation for taking banana cultivation, sources of information about fertilizer, pesticides and seed material and marketing channels of banana growers. Majority of the farmers were motivated (48%) by themselves, reasons for taking banana cultivation were high yield and income, performing the banana cultivation practices based on their own experiences. About 65% of the respondents were using locally available seed materials. Major chunk of the farmers contacted banana traders for getting information about fertilizer and pesticides and selling their produce through local mandies.

 

61. A. T. Krishnamurthy, V. B. Sanath Kumar, Y. S. Ramesha, R. Manjunath and N. Arun [Technology adoption levels and socio-economic profiles of banana growers in Chikmagalur district]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 303-306 (2009). Department of Agricultural Extension College of Horticulture, Mudigere, Chikmagalur-577 132 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

Levels of technology adoption play a vital role in increasing the production of banana. The present investigation was conducted during the year 2007 with the sample size of 100 respondents. They were interviewed using pre-tested schedule to know the socio-economic profile, extent of adoption, source and method of irrigation and soil testing behaviour of banana growing farmers of Mudigere and N. R. Pura taluk of Chikmagalur district. Major portion of the selected farmers was middle aged having high school and above level of education with small size of family and marginal holding. All the farmers adopted recommended practices such as number of suckers per pit in main as well as ratoon crop. None of the farmers adopted bio-fertilizers and 68% of them partially adopted recommended quantity of organic manure. No respondents applied recommended dose of fertilizers but 95% of them used less than the recommended dosage. Whereas no one used micronutrients, only negligible portion (12.0%) of the farmers used phorate to control nematode and carbendazim or bordeaux mixture against leaf spot.

62. SAEED ZANGANEHE SHAHRAKI, ZAHRA ARZJANI and NARGES AHMADIFARD [A systematic study of the impact of urbanization of Tehran city on agricultural and garden land use]. Crop Res. 37 (1, 2 & 3) : 307-311 (2009). Geography and Urban Planning Department University of Tehran, Iran

ABSTRACT

Increasing urbanization of Iran over the last several decades has caused sharp increase in urban land use, number of cities and populations of cities. Most Iranian cities are located into or in the vicinity of agricultural lands, only with the purpose of using them. Due to the fast physical development of the cities, these desirable rich agricultural lands are being transformed into urban land uses. Tehran city is a good example, it is experiencing a great deal of physical development, caused by many pull factors and increased by immigrations. In this research work, a systematic study is presented on the impact of urban physical development of Tehran city on agricultural land diminishment. This study was carried out, with the help of satellite imagery taken during 1978-2000. Arc GIS software is effectively used for changing the imagery to maps. Results of this study can be alarming, over 19000 hectares of best agricultural land was transformed into urban land use over this period of 22 years. Apart from the above quantitative analysis, some necessary concerns are raised regarding the possible futuristic undesirable consequences from this phenomenon, if it is not controlled. Some effective ways of control are also suggested. Some further research directions are also suggested.