Volume 27, Number 1(January, 2004)

By | July 22, 2014

Titles of research papers/articles alongwith their abstracts.
For full text, please contact to Editor-in-chief at :
md@cropresearch.org


1. R. K. MAITI1, V. P. SINGH, P. WESCHE-EBELING, E. SANCHEZ-ARREOLA, T. HERNANDEZ AND E. AGUILAR-NAJERA [Research advances on cold, drought and salinity tolerance and its mechanisms of resistance in maize (Zea mays L.) – A review]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 1-29 (2004). Departamento de Química y Biología Universidad de las Américas, Puebla Santa Catarina Martir, Cholula, A. P. 78, C. P. 72820, Puebla, México.


ABSTRACT

The paper gives a brief review of research advances on the resistance mechanisms of maize to environmental stresses such as cold temperature, heat, drought and salinity, that affect maize productivity. Research has been directed mainly to the selection of genotypes tolerant to these stresses and understanding physiological and biochemical mechanisms of tolerance. Sufficient research has been undertaken to select maize tolerant to low temperature. Cold temperatures affect the ultra-structure of chloroplasts and function of membranes and cell organelles in maize leaves. Cold tolerance is associated with the accumulation of proline, abscisic acid, putrescine, glycinebetaine, fatty acids and some other compounds. Resistance to drought and salinity is associated with the accumulation of proline and heat shock proteins. Tolerance to salinity involves three principal phenomena including ion accumulation/imbalance, osmotic inhibition of water or osmotic adjustment, and metabolic alterations. The accumulation of sodium in the leaves and roots contributes to resistance to salinity stress. This review also discusses recent advances in genetic engineering for improvement of maize towards various stress factors.


2. R. K. MAITI1 AND V. P. SINGH [Biotic factors affecting pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.] growth and productivity–A review]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 30-39 (2004). Departamento de Química y Biología Universidad de las Americas, Santa Catarina Martir, Cholula, C. P. 72820, Puebla, Mexico.


ABSTRACT

The present review discusses that several diseases affect the growth and productivity of pearl millet such as downy mildew (Sclerospora graminicola) and rust (Puccinia substriata). Among these, downy mildew causes devastating problem in some pearl millet growing areas leading to a severe yield reduction. Some studies have been undertaken to investigate the gravity of the problems, epidemiology of the disease and control measures as well as genetic improvement of these diseases with reasonable successes, specially in the case of downy mildew. Besides several minor diseases affecting pearl millet are reported. Insects and weeds are of minor importance in pearl millet.


3. SANJAY KUMAR, A. D. BINDRA AND P. C. KATOCH [Planting patterns studies for intercropped rice and soybean under rainfed conditions]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 40-42 (2004). CSK HPKV Rice Research Station, Malan-176 047 (H. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

Field experiment under rainfed upland condition was conducted to find out the most suitable planting pattern for intercropping of rice with soybean. Four growing ratios of rice and soybean viz., 4 : 1, 4 : 2, 4 : 4 and 6 : 3 were tested under two rice varieties viz., VL Dhan 221 and HPR 842 alongwith their sole crops. The results revealed that 4 : 4 planting pattern for intercropped rice with soybean was the best among other intercropping ratios and gave about 167 and 97% higher rice equivalent yield over sole crop of VL Dhan 221 and HPR 842, respectively.


4. PRODIP HANDIQUE1 AND R. C. SARMAH [Indigenous seed selection and sowing methods of rice in Assam]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 43-45 (2004). Department of Extension Education Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785 013 (Assam), India.

ABSTRACT

The study was conducted in Lakhimpur, Sonitpur and Dhemaji districts of North Bank Plain Zone of Assam involving 180 farmers selected through multistage random sampling. It was found that the farmers first of all selected the plot for collecting seeds. After that healthy plants were chosen and harvested. Before threshing, sorting was done to remove weak and disease affected panicles. Threshing was done by stepping or by beating. The seeds were thoroughly cleaned and dried and stored in locally made bamboo bin called toom.

5. A. S. SAJJAN, K. N. PAWAR, M. S. DHANALEPPAGOL AND B. D. BIRADAR [Influence of water stress treatments on seed quality of sorghum genotypes]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 46-49 (2004). U. A. S. Regional Research Station, Bijapur-586 101 (Karnataka), India.


ABSTRACT

The laboratory studies on influence of water stress on seed quality of sorghum genotypes were conducted at Agricultural College, Bijapur, Karnataka. The increasing levels of water stress significantly reduced the seed germination, seedling length and seedling vigour index. Among the genotypes, BRJ-356 was recorded early and higher germination and able to germinate upto 7.0 bar fallowed by M-35-1, while lower and delayed seed germination was seen in genotype 9-13. Based on this investigation, it was inferred that BRJ-356 had early and higher germination followed by M-35-1 and least was noticed in 9-13 genotype.


6. S. K. UPPAL AND S. SHARMA [Post-harvest losses in sugarcane under different weather conditions]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 50-53 (2004). PAU Sugarcane Research Station, Jalandhar-144 001 (Punjab), India.


ABSTRACT

A study was carried out at PAU Sugarcane Research Station, Jalandhar to find out the effect of post-harvest duration (h) on stability/deterioration of two varieties viz., CoP 211 (early maturing) and CoJ 84 (mid maturing) for 216 h storage under natural field conditions during March and April with varying temperatures. The overall ranking on the basis of b-values (regression coefficients) for cane weight loss %, pol loss in juice (% cane) and increase in reducing sugars in juice (% cane) showed that CoP 211 was more stable than CoJ 84 during the month of March (average maximum temperature 27.1o, minimum temperature 13.4oC) but the trend was reverse during the month of April (average maximum temperature 37.2o, minimum temperature 21.8oC). Although, upto 96 h of post-harvest storage, CoP 211 was more stable than CoJ 84. Deterioration was higher during the month of April than March.

7. M. S. RATHORE, I. SINGH AND M. S. CHANDAWAT [Suitability of grain amaranth (Amaranthus hypocondriacus) cultivars for arid western plains zone of Rajasthan and their response to nitrogen application]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 54-57 (2004). R. A. U. Agricultural Research Station, Mandore-342 304, Jodhpur (Rajasthan), India.

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during the winter seasons of 1997-98 and 1998-99 at Agricultural Research Station, Mandore to find out suitability of grain amaranth variety for this agro-climatic region and response of these varieties to applied nitrogen. Among the genotypes, GA-1 gave significantly higher seed yield (16.05 q/ha) over Suvarna (14.91 q/ha) and Annapurna (9.88 q/ha), as it had better growth and yield attributes than other varieties. Seed yield enhanced significantly with increase in N application to 60 kg/ha only. Application of N enhanced growth and yield attributes significantly, whereas harvest index remained unaffected. The optimum dose and maximum doses estimated through quadratic response were found to be 83 and 87 kg N/ha, respectively. Variety GA-1 gave highest gross income of Rs. 24,675/ha and application of 60 kg N/ha recorded a gross return of Rs. 23,535/ha.


8. S. RAJAVEL, A. SOLAIMALAI, R. BASKARAN, C. MURALIDARAN AND K. SACHITHANANTHAM [Yield components and yield of irrigated soybean as influenced by fertilizer levels and CO2 enrichment techniques]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 58-62 (2004). T. N. A. U. Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Vriddhachalam-606 001 (T. N.), India.

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted during summer and kharif seasons of 1999 to study the effect of fertilizer levels and CO2 enrichment techniques on yield components and yields of soybean. Application of 20 : 80 : 40 kg NPK/ha produced higher number of branches/plant, number of pods/plant, number of seeds/pod, test weight and yields of soybean than application of 15 : 60 : 30 kg NPK/ha. Application of treated coir pith @ 12.5 t/ha resulted in higher yield components and yields of soybean in both the seasons. Lowest yield parameters and yields were obtained with control.


9. S. L. NAMDEO, B. B. PARMAR AND MOHAN SINGH1 [Nodulation, yield and P-uptake of soybean as influenced by rock phosphate-charged compost, fortified with nitrogen and pyrite]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 63-69 (2004). Zonal Agricultural Research Station JNKVV College of Agriculture, Indore-452 001 (M. P.), India.


ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during the kharif seasons of 1998-99 and 1999-2000 to assess the performance of composts initially charged with Jhabua rock phosphate (JRP) and further fortified with 1% N (as urea) and pyrite (at two levels : 5 and 10%) with respect to nodulation, yield and P-uptake of soybean. The application of four N and pyrite-based phospho-composts (T3, T4, T5 and T6) meant to supply 60 kg P2O5/ha alongwith 25% of the recommended N/ha+20 kg K2O/ha as well as 100% NPK application (20 kg N+60 kg P2O5+20 kg K2O/ha) through chemical fertilizers exhibited identical performance in respect of mean nodule number (34 to 39 nodules/plant), nodule dry weight (189 to 197 mg/plant), shoot dry weight (7.0 to 7.8 g/plant), grain yield (1667 to 1724 kg/ha) and straw yield (2993 to 3108 kg/ha) of soybean. These treatments were found superior to the application of phospho-composts without N and pyrite enrichment. Beneficial effect of enrichment was also reflected in the total uptake of P by the soybean crop. Performance of T6 treatment (60 kg P2O5/ha through PC6 consisting of 25% JRP+1% N+10% pyrite alongwith 25% of the recommended N and 20 kg K2O/ha) was found to be the best as it fulfilled 75% of N need of the soybean crop, besides meeting the entire quantity of recommended P, when applied to soil on equal P2O5-basis.


10. R. K. RAGHUWANSHI, V. S. GAUTAM, S. S. KUSHWAHA AND N. K. SHARMA [Effect of intercropping of soybean with sorghum on yield and N uptake and available N status in vertisol of Madhya Pradesh]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 70-76 (2004). JNKVV College of Agriculture, Indore-452 001 (M. P.), India.


ABSTRACT

A study was conducted with an objective of assessing the requirement and intercrops impact on yield. The results indicated that soybean+sorghum intercrops gave 6.64 and 3456 kg ha-1 in 6 : 3 and 1 : 2 row, respectively. However, higher yield was obtained in sole cropping of soybean and sorghum. The maximum nitrogen uptake was observed in soybean and in sorghum sole cropping (64.22 and 341.68 kg ha-1, respectively). Among soybean+sorghum intercropping, N uptake was (48.74 kg ha-1) in 6 : 3 row ratio by soybean and for sorghum 243.21 kg ha-1. The lowest N in 1 : 2 row ratio uptake was observed in soybean with 1 : 2 row ratio i. e. 31.47 and in sorghum 152.25 kg ha-1 with 4 : 2 row ratio.


11. Y. P. SINGH AND C. P. S. CHAUHAN1 [Effect of sulphur, phosphorus and inoculation treatments on yield, nitrogen uptake and biological N fixation by lentil crop]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 77-82 (2004). Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Banasthali Vidyapeeth, Tonk-304 022 (Rajasthan), India.


ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted on sulphur and phosphorus deficient sandy loam soil on lentil crop to evaluate the effect of S and P in the presence and absence of rhizobium inoculation. Sulphur and phosphorus application increased the growth and yield of lentil significantly upto 60 kg S ha-1 and 25.8 kg P ha-1. Inoculation treatment also improved the growth and yield over uninoculated treatment. As per response between S and P data suggested that the optimum dose for lentil crop was 47.6 kg S and 25.8 kg P ha-1. The maximum and significantly higher N and K content, uptake by grain and straw of lentil and biological N fixation were found with 60 kg S and 25.8 kg P ha-1 and at par with 90 kg S and 38.7 kg P ha-1.


12. U. K. BEHERA1, K. P. JHA2 AND I. C. MAHAPATRA [Integrated management of available resources of the small and marginal farmers for generation of income and employment in eastern India]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 83-89 (2004). Department of Agronomy Orissa University of Agriculture & Technology, Bhubaneswar-751 003 (Orissa), India.


ABSTRACT

The studies were conducted in the farm of marginal farmers in Rautarapur village of north-east Orissa during 1992-94 involving enterprises like field and horticultural crops, fishery, poultry, duckery, apiary, mushroom, dairy and agro-forestry. The size of the holding of the farm was 1.2 acres (0.48 ha). The objective of the study was to generate more income and employment opportunities for the marginal farmers. From the small farm area of only 1.0 acre (0.4 ha), a net return of Rs. 19136 was obtained with an investment of Rs. 19991 and employment opportunity of 275 man days was generated. Since the marginal farmer had four children and two adults, his family labourers were under utilized. Adoption of integrated farming involving above mentioned enterprises helped the marginal farmer to generate a monthly income of Rs. 1600 excluding his labour utilized in the farm. The production of fish, mushroom, poultry, duckery and honey in the farm itself helped in improving the standard of living by consuming part of this product for better nourishment of his family members. The enterprises like composite pisciculture, bio-gas production, apiary and vegetable cultivation for regular income drew special attention of the marginal farmers.


13. SOMNATH BHATTACHARYYA AND SHYAMAL K. GHOSH [Association among yield related traits of twenty-four diverse landraces of rice]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 90-93 (2004). Division of Genetics, RRSS, Sekhampur Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, P. O. Gadadharpur, Dist. Birbhum (W. B.), India.


ABSTRACT

Experiments were carried out in kharif season to study the association among yield and yield related traits in 24 landraces of rice under red and lateritic soil condition. Path analysis alongwith correlation coefficient analysis revealed that panicle weight and duration of panicle initiation had the major contribution towards yield. Effective tiller number had negative association with yield and yield related traits. The implication of these findings in relation to varietal introduction and breeding programme of rice in red and laterite zone is emphasized.


14. ADNAN KANBAR1, H. E. SHASHIDHAR AND S. HITTALMANI [Correlation and path analysis for root morphological traits in indica x indica population of rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 94-98 (2004). MAS Lab., Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India.


ABSTRACT

This research was carried out on 127 doubled haploid lines alongwith parents and four checks in a randomized complete block design with three replications during wet season 2000. In the trial, the following traits were investigated : plant height, number of tillers per plant, maximum root length, total root number, root volume, shoot dry weight and root dry weight. Genotypic and phenotypic correlation and path coefficient were calculated to determine direct and indirect effects of these traits on root dry weight. There was positive and significant correlation between root dry weight and all other traits in this study. Path coefficients indicated that direct and indirect effects of number of tillers per plant, total root number, root volume and shoot dry weight via plant height and maximum root length on root dry weight were positive.


15. P. SENTHIL KUMAR, R. PUSPHA, P. KARUPPIAH AND J. GANESAN [Studies on combining ability in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.)]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 99-103 (2004). Faculty of Agriculture Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar-608 002 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

Ten diverse genotypes (lines) were crossed with three testers resulting in 30 hybrids. These 13 parents and 30 crosses were used to estimate the general combining ability of parents, and specific combining ability of crosses for seven characters viz., plant height, number of branches per plant, number of capsules per plant, capsule length, number of seeds per capsule, 1000-seed weight and seed yield per plant. Based on the general combining ability effects, AUS-4 among lines and SVPR-1 among testers were found to be good general combiners for seed yield per plant. Based on sca effect the crosses AUS 29 x SVPR-1 and AUS 15 x RT 125 showed the highest and significant sca effects for seed yield per plant, number of seeds per capsule and number of capsules per plant. The combining ability variance indicated the preponderance of non-additive gene action for all the characters studied indicating the scope for heterosis breeding in crop improvement.


16. MAHESH SHRIMALI AND O. P. KHEDAR [Early generation selection as estimators of yield potential in two wheat crosses (T. durum Desf.)]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 104-108 (2004). Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding
Agricultural Research Station, Durgapura, Jaipur (Rajasthan), India.

ABSTRACT

Two selection procedures, wheat grain yield (GY) and total dry matter (TDM) of F2 single plants, were compared in two wheat crosses for their relative effectiveness in estimating the yield potential of F3 and F4 bulks. F2 plants were space planted in the field with 30 cm between plants and between rows. At maturity, 80 F2 plants having good agronomic characteristics were harvested from each cross and evaluated for GY, TDM and grain protein. The top 20% of the F2 plants in GY and TDM from each of the crosses were tagged and their performance monitored together with the rest of the lines in F3 and F4 bulk yield tests in separate 86 entry 4 m single row plots in triple lattice design with the cocorit “s” and Raj-911 as check varieties. The grain yield selection procedure identified seven F3 and seven F4 high yielding bulks, while the TDM selection procedure identified 13 F3 and 10 F4 high yielding bulks from the two crosses, indicating that TDM selection procedure was superior to the GY selection procedure in identifying F2 single plants having high yield potential.


17. B. SINGH AND A. K. SINGH [Gene effect for various quantitative traits in brinjal (Solanum melongena L.)] Crop Res. 27 (1) : 109-110 (2004). HPKV Regional Station, Dhaulakuan, Sirmour-173 001 (H. P.), India.

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted to understand the gene effect for 10 quantitative traits in brinjal at HPKV Regonal Research Station, Dhaulakuan. The results showed involvement of non-additive gene action in the inheritance of duration of availability of consumable fruits and plant height. For rest of the traits including marketable fruit yield per plant, additive type of gene effect was noticed and could be improved and fixed in pure line by pedigree selection in segregating population.


18. B. S. DHANKHAR AND S. K. DHANKHAR [Induction of genetic male sterility in okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench]]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 111-112 (2004). Department of Vegetable Science CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India.


ABSTRACT

Male sterile (ms) plant selected from the M2 generation of Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench var. Varsha Uphar in treatment 70 kR gamma rays irradiation was studied for its inheritance pattern. The male sterile plant was crossed with male fertile (mf) inbred line MR 54-2 and also with fertile plant from the same treatment i. e. 70 kR. The F1 generation plants were all fertile and F2 plants segregated in the ratio of 3 mf and 1 ms indicating that mf is dominant over ms and it is governed by a single gene in the present study.


19. ENRIQUE LUPITO ALMANZA, R. K. MAITI1, J. VERDE STAR AND J. L. HERNANDEZ-PINERO [Variation in nutritional quality of wild chilli, “Chile piquín” (Capsicum annuum var. aviculare Dierb) at different stages of fruit maturity : A preliminary study]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 113-115 (2004). Postgraduate Division, Facultad de Ciencias Biologícas Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Ciudad Universitaría
Apartado Postal F-16, C. P. 66450, San Nicolás de los Garza, N. L., Mexico.

ABSTRACT

This paper reports that there exists large variations in nutritional value of Chile piquín (Capsicum annuum var. aviculare Dierb) fruit at different stages of fruit maturity with respect to ash, lipid, crude fibre, crude protein, nitrogen free extract. The results indicate that green fruit and red fruit contain high protein content. Ash content was very high in red fruit.


20. PUSHPA U. KAMBLE1, S. KRISHNAVENI2, M. RAMIAH, SURJEET SINGH3 AND D. V. PATIL4 [Association of tungro virus disease and nucleic acid content in susceptible and resistant genotypes of rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 116-120 (2004). Department of Plant Pathology Centre for Plant Protection Studies Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

Nucleic acid (RNA and DNA) content was estimated in susceptible (IR 50, ADT 36, White Ponni, IR 58025B and CO 47) and resistant donor (NSN 99, Ptb 33, T 15942, T 16227 and T 16431) to rice tungro virus disease. Genotypic difference in RNA and DNA level was noticed and it was significant in both the susceptible and resistant genotypes. There was a significant increase of RNA (62.23%) and DNA (74.36%) content in susceptible inoculated over resistant inoculated genotypes. The increase of RNA (48.51%) and DNA (60.91%) was recorded in susceptible inoculated over healthy susceptible genotypes. No significant difference in RNA and DNA level of sampling period (10, 20 and 30 days) was observed in healthy and inoculated resistant and susceptible genotypes. Positive and significant correlation coefficient (0.867**) was recorded if susceptible genotypes exposed to the biotic factor viz., rice tungro virus. No correlation was noticed (0.032NS) when resistant genotypes were exposed to the tungro virus disease stress.


21. PUSHPA U. KAMBLE1, M. RAMIAH, D. V. PATIL2 AND SURJEET SINGH3 [Combining tungro virus disease resistant traits in susceptible genotypes of rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 121-126 (2004). Department of Plant Pathology Centre for Plant Protection Studies Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India.

ABSTRACT

The genotypes NSN 99, Ptb 33, T 15942, T 16227 and T 16431, a resistant source to rice tungro virus disease, were used for introgression of resistant genes to susceptible cultivars viz., ADT 36, IR 50, CO 47, White Ponni and IR 58025B. The lines White Ponni, CO 47 and tester T 15942 recorded significant gca effects and found a good general combiner for RTD per cent, RTD mean grade, productive tillers per clump, 1000-grain weight and grain yield per plant. The crosses White Ponni x T 15942, CO 47 x T 15942 and IR 58025B x Ptb 33 showed superior sca effects for all the traits (RTD per cent, RTD mean grade, plant height, productive tillers per clump, 1000-grain weight and grain yield per plant). Lines White Ponni, CO 47 and tester T 15942 showed additive gene action with higher magnitude of gca to sca variance for RTD per cent and mean grade. Additive genetic variance was predominant over non-additive genetic variance, which indicated greater role of parents compared to cross combinations. The non-additive gene action was recorded in cross combinations and showed higher magnitude of sca variance for RTD and RTD mean grade indicating interactive effect of non-additive gene action.


22. R. K. MAITI1, E. SÁNCHEZ-ARREOLA, P. WESCHE-EBELING AND O. ERIC RAMIREZ-BRAVO [Germination and seedling development of Agave potatorum Zucc.]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 127-130 (2004). Departamento de Química y Biología Universidad de las Américas, Puebla Santa Catarina Mártir, Cholula, C. P. 72820, Puebla.


ABSTRACT

Agave potatorum Zucc. suffers over exploitation making flowering unusual, as well as seed production. Establishment of seedlings, if any, is very rare. Propagation is done by shoots, causing loss of genetic diversity. A 2% hypochlorite solution applied for 10 min was used to enhance seed germination. Germination rate proved to decay in treated seeds (36%) compared with that of untreated seeds (47%). Watering with 20 ml each 2, 3, 5 and 10 days treatments were used to test water stress responses on seedlings. Plants watered each three days showed to have a high increase in mass compared to other treatments. Water stress proved to be one of the causes of rare seedling establishment.

23. R. K. MAITI1, P. WESCHE-EBELING, J. S. FLORES1 AND L. ALANIS-GUZMAN1 [A study on phenology and nutritional values of wild species of Brassica campestris L. and Sisymbrium irio L. (Crucifereae) in the semi-arid regions of Monterrey, N. L., Mexico]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 131-136 (2004). Departamento de Quimica y Biologia
Universidad de las Americas, Puebla Santa Catarina Martir, Cholula, C. P. 72820, Puebla, México *(e-mail : maitirk@mail.cityonlines.com).

ABSTRACT

The present paper reports on the morphology, phenology and nutritional values of two wild species of Brassica campestris L. and Sisymbrium irio L. (Cruciferae), grown abundantly in the semi-arid regions of Monterrey. B. campestris grows at the end of September and from the beginning of October to March, while Sisymbrium from September to the mid-April. The bromatological analysis showed that the leaves and stems in the vegetative stage contained high levels of proteins (26 to 32%) for the species. The seeds of B. campestris contained high percentage of lipids and protein. Therefore, both the species offer great potential of food of high nutritional value and may be considered an unemployed feed resource.


24. M. A. NUNEZ-GONZALEZ, R. K. MAITI1 AND V. P. SINGH2 [Differential responses of mineral acquisition by glossy and non-glossy sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]]. Crop Res. 27 (1) : 137-143 (2004). Post-graduate Division, Biology Faculty Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León Apartado Postal-88, C. P. 66450, San Nicolas de los Garza, N. L., México.

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to determine differential acquisition of calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn) and potassium (K) by glossy and non-glossy sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] genotypes grown 45 days in nutrient solutions in a growth chamber. Genotype responses were studied at high and low concentrations of nutrients. The glossy genotypes I 5567, IS 1982 and IS 4476 had significantly higher concentrations of mineral nutrients than the non-slossy TY 101R and M 911R genotypes at all nutrient solution levels. Glossy genotypes appeared to be better adapted to low and high mineral conditions than non-glossy genotypes. Glossy genotypes are recommended over non-glossy genotypes for forage and grain production in the semi-arid regions of Mexico.