Volume 2, Number 2 (August 2001)

By | July 26, 2014

Titles of research papers/articles alongwith their abstracts.
For full text, please contact to Editor-in-chief at :info@cropresearch.org


1. M. A. TURK AND A. M. TAWAHA [Effect of time and frequency of weeding on growth, yield and economics of chickpea and lentil]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 103-107 (2001). Department of Plant Production, Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST), Irbid, P. O. Box 3030, Jordan

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were conducted on two locations to investigate the effect of time and frequency of weeding on the performance of chickpea and lentil grown under semi-arid conditions during 1999-2000 growing season. Weeds reduced the grain yields of chickpea and lentil by 29.8 and 67.9%, respectively. Weeding chickpea once at 25 days after sowing (DAS) significantly increased the grain yield (420 kg ha-1) and net return (US $ 500) with the maximum benefit : cost ratio (0.52). On the other hand, weeding lentil twice at 30 and 60 DAS significantly increased the grain yield (1300 kg ha-1) and net return (US $ 910) with maximum benefit : cost ratio (0.69). Volume 2, Number 2 (August, 2001)

2. SHIVESH SHARMA, N. S. DARAMWAL, C. R. SHARMA AND R. G. UPADHYAY [Influence of various doses of nitrogen and phosphorus on protein content, yield and its attributes of mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 108-111 (2001) Department of Microbiology, Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The yield and its attributes and protein content of Vigna radiata were studied at harvest stage in kharif seasons of 1998 and 1999 under mid-hill conditions of Himachal Pradesh. The test weight (g), seed yield and biological yield (q/ha) were significantly influenced by nitrogen and phosphorus treatment. The application of 20 kg N/ha and 60 kg P2O5/ha brought about significantly maximum increase in these characters. Each increasing level of fertilizers N and P showed a significant difference over its previous level. The protein content in grain was significantly affected by fertilizer treatment but no treatment was able to influence the protein content in straw. However, a slight increase over control was recorded in all the treatments.

3. SHIVESH SHARMA [Growth, physiological and yield aspects of mungbean (Vigna radiata) as affected by inoculation treatment by different strains of Bradyrhizobium culture]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 112-115 (2001). Department of Microbiology, Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field trial was carried out to study the influence of various strains of Bradyrhizobium inoculation on growth, physiological parameters and yield of green gram under mid-hill conditions of Palampur (H. P.). The local isolate of Bradyrhizobium sp. showed significantly maximum increase in crop growth rate, relative growth rate and photosynthetic efficiency at various stages of crop growth. The value of CGR and RGR was found to be maximum at 30-45 days after sowing stage and thereafter it started declining. Similarly, photosynthetic efficiency was at its peak at flowering stage and showed a decreasing pattern, which continued till pod maturity stage. The days to achieve 50% flowering and maturity were also significantly influenced by inoculation treatment. The seeds inoculated with local isolate showed significantly maximum seed yield as compared to other strains and control.

4. NARENDER K. SANKHYAN, BHARAT BHUSHAN AND PRITAM K. SHARMA [Effect of phosphorus, mulch and farm yard manure on soil moisture and productivity of maize in mid hills of Himachal Pradesh]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 116-119 (2001). Department of Soil Science, Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Effect of mulching with an organic waste wild sage (Lantana camara L.), farm yard manure (FYM) and phosphorus on soil moisture and productivity of maize (Zea mays L.) in an alfisol at Palampur (1210 m above mean sea level), representing mid-hills of Himachal Pradesh, was studied during 1994 and 1995. The soil was silty clay loam, having large mean weight diameter, less retentive and highly permeable to water. The increase in soil moisture with mulching as well as with the application of FYM was observed during both the years of study. A significant increase in the productivity of maize was also resulted by the application of mulch, FYM and phosphorus.

5. PARAMJIT, V. P. SINGH AND D. K. ROY [Effect of different levels of nitrogen and irrigation on nitrogen uptake and quality of malt barley var. Alfa-93]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 120-122 (2001)Department of Agronomy, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

ABSTRACT

The field experiment was conducted during rabi season of 1998-99 at Agronomy Research Area, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar. The experiment comprised four levels of irrigation i. e. I0 (no irrigation), I1 (one irrigation at tillering stage), I2 (one irrigation at flag leaf stage) and I3 (two irrigations first at tillering and second at flag leaf stage) and four levels of nitrogen (0, 30, 60 and 90 kg N ha-1). The treatments were replicated four times in split plot design. The application of two irrigations (I3) significantly increased the nitrogen content and uptake in grain and straw, and protein content in grain as compared to other treatments of irrigation. The malt yield decreased with the increasing frequency of irrigation. The increasing levels of nitrogen upto 90 kg N ha-1 significantly increased the nitrogen concentration and uptake by grain and straw and protein content in grain. The malt yield decreased significantly with the increasing levels of nitrogen upto 90 kg N ha-1.

6. VIRENDER SARDANA AND S. S. NARWAL [Effect of Rhizobium seed inoculation and nitrogen on the fodder quality of berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum L.) under different levels of phosphoru]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 123-133 (2001).s Department of Agronomy, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

ABSTRACT

Effect of Rhizobium seed inoculation, nitrogen and phosphorus on the fodder quality of berseem was studied during 1992-93 and 1993-94. Seed inoculation or application of 25 kg N/ha improved the protein and ash contents but adversely affected the NDF and ADF contents and NFE value of fodder and straw over their respective controls. While seed inoculation improved the ether extract, crude fibre and hemicellulose content of fodder and straw over without inoculation, application of nitrogen decreased the ether extract and hemicellulose contents. Total protein yield with seed inoculation was significantly higher than without inoculation, whereas nitrogen application significantly increased it in 1993-94 only. Application of 80 kg P2O5/ha significantly increased the ether extract, crude fibre, ash content, NDF, ADF, hemicellulose and protein contents of fodder over control, while similar increase in case of straw for ash, NDF and ADF contents was also significant. Total protein yield with 80 kg P2O5/ha was significantly higher than control in both the years.

7. E. ARUNA, P. GOPALA RAO AND V. RADHA KRISHNAMURTHY [Effect of post-flowering nutrition on dry matter production and nutrient uptake in bold kernel type groundnut (Arachis hypogaea)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 134-136 (2001). Department of Agronomy, S. V. Agricultural College, Tirupati (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Results of the field experiment conducted on sandy soil of Tirupati (A. P.) during rabi 1997-98 to study the effect of post-flowering nutrition management for export quality bold kernel type groundnut revealed that foliar application of 2% DAP+0.5% ZnSO4+0.5% boric acid at 30, 45, 60 and 75 DAS in addition to normal recommended dose of NPK was superior in dry matter production and nutrient uptake.

8. E. ARUNA, P. GOPALA RAO AND V. RADHA KRISHNAMURTHY [Effect of post-flowering nutrition management on yield and economics of bold kernel type groundnut (Arachis hypogaea)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 137-140 (2001). Department of Agronomy, S. V. Agricultural College, Tirupati, (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Results of field experiment conducted on sandy soil of Tirupati (A. P.) during rabi 1997-98 to study the effect of post-flowering nutrition management for export quality bold kernel type groundnut revealed that foliar application of 2% DAP+0.5% ZnSO4+0.5% boric acid at 30, 45, 60 and 75 days after sowing (DAS) in addition to normal recommended dose of NPK was superior in improving the yield components and yield. This treatment has also given highest net returns and benefit : cost ratio.

9. GYANENDRA TIWARI, S. K. DWIVEDI, S. K. SHRIVASTAVA, J. P. TIWARI AND V. K. AGRAWAL [Influence of crop density and phosphorus levels on structural components of productivity and seed yield in linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 141-144 (2001). Department of Agricultural Botany and Crop Physiology , J. N. Krishi Vishva Vidyalaya, Jabalpur-482 004 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field investigation was conducted during rabi 1996-97 and 1997-98 to study the influence of five plant population densities (20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 lakh plants/ha) and four phosphorus levels (0, 15, 25 and 35 kg P2O5/ha) in split plot design with three replications. The treatments showed a wide variability in morphological structural components of yield and economic yield. A progressive increase in biological yield was obtained with 40 lakh plants/ha but HI and economic yield were maximum with 30 lakh plants/ha. However, the structural components were superior at lower plant density (20 lakh plants/ha). Similarly, a linear pattern of improvement in yield attributes and yield was registered upto 25 kg P2O5/ha beyond that there was no significant increase in these traits.

10. K. K. SINGH AND GYATRI VERMA [Effect of soil compaction on physical properties of loamy sand soil and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 145-147 (2001). Project Directorate (Research), Agriculture & Soil Survey, Krishi Bhavan, Bikaner-334 001 (Rajasthan), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was undertaken to evaluate the effect of soil compaction by surface rolling of a loamy sand soil on soil physical properties and yield of groundnut. It was found that compaction reduced the water intake and increased the moisture retention with concomitant reduction in infiltration and increase in bulk density more so with increased levels of compaction. The yield of groundnut also increased significantly with increasing levels of compaction. Compaction involving 15 passings of 500 kg iron roller was found to be most beneficial.

11. Y. SIVA LAKSHMI, P. GOPALA RAO AND V. RADHA KRISHNAMURTHY [Influence of pre-monsoon and monsoon intercrops with sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in sequence cropping]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 148-155 (2001). Department of Agronomy, S. V. Agricultural College, Tirupati (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted in pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons during the period 1998-99 at S. V. Agricultural College Farm, Tirupati (A. P.), India. Four crops viz., sesamum, greengram, clusterbean and bajra were laid out during pre-monsoon season. After the harvest of each of the pre-monsoon crop, five treatments comprising sole sunflower and four intercrops viz., fingermillet, cowpea, niger and ricebean with sunflower were laid out during monsoon season. In the pre-monsoon season, clusterbean was found better followed by greengram, sesamum and bajra in terms of sesamum grain equivalents. During monsoon season, sunflower+cowpea was found better followed by sunflower with niger>sunflower with ricebean>sunflower with fingermillet>sole sunflower in terms of sunflower grain equivalents.

12. S. KUMARAN [Response of groundnut to organic manure, fertilizer levels, split application of phosphorus and gypsum application under irrigated condition]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 156-158 (2001). Department of Agronomy, T. N. A. U. Agricultural College and Research Institute, Killikulam-628 252 (T. N.), India

ABSTRACT

In order to find out the effect of organic manure, fertilizer levels, split application of phosphorus and gypsum application on groundnut under irrigated condition, the field experiment was conducted during summer 1996 and rabi 1997 at T. N. A. U. Agricultural College and Research Institute, Killikulam, Tamil Nadu. The results revealed that application of 34 : 17 : 54 kg NPK ha-1+FYM 12.5 t ha-1 (as basal)+17 kg P2O5 ha-1 on 30 DAS+400 kg gypsum ha-1 on 40 DAS produced higher number of matured pods per plant, pod weight per plant, number of kernels per pod, test weight, pod yield and haulm yield of groundnut. The recommended fertilizer level (17 : 34 : 54 kg NPK ha-1) recorded lower yield parameters and pod yield of groundnut during both the seasons.

13. T. R. Nandal, Ankur Vermani and Ravinder Singh [Herbicidal effect on growth, yield and yield attributes of garlic (Allium sativum L.)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 159-161 (2001). C. S. K. K. V. Regional Research Station, Dhaulakuan, Sirmour-173 001 (H. P.), India

ABSTRACT

An investigation on weed management studies in garlic, consisting of 13 treatments namely, fluchloralin, oxadiazon, pendimethalin (each @ 1.00 and 1.50 kg/ha), lower dose of each combined with hand weeding (HW) at 40 days after sowing (DAS), HW 40 DAS, HW 40 and 70 DAS, weed free and weedy check, was conducted at Regional Research Station, Dhaulakuan of Chaudhary Sarwan Kumar Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur (Himachal Pradesh). The results revealed that oxadiazon applied @ 1.50 kg/ha showed its supremacy for most of the growth, yield and yield attributes of garlic and was followed by oxadiazon @ 1.00 kg/ha+HW 40 DAS as well as pendimethalin @ 1.50 kg/ha.

14. R. K. Samaiya, K. C. Shukla and R. K. Saraf [Studies on agri-silvi-cultural model under rainfed agro-ecosystem of Sagar region]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 162-165 (2001). JNKVV Regional Agricultural research Station, Sagar-470 002 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The agro-forestry, a land management system, is gaining popularity among the farmers in the region. A field experiment was initiated in the kharif 1990 in marginal soil at JNKVV Regional Agricultural Research Station, Sagar. Under agri-silvi-cultural model multipurpose tree species viz., subabul (Leucaena leucocephala), bakain (Melia azedarach) and siris (Albizia lebbeck) were planted in randomised block design with four replications. The plot size was 10 m x 12 m. Each species had three rows having five plants in each row with tree to tree distance 2 m and tree row to row distance was 4 m. One control plot (without trees) was also kept in each replication. In the kharif 1993, soybean crop was taken in the interspaces of these four years old MPTs. The growth parameters of these MPTs were studied. The maximum tree height (524 cm) was recorded in subabul, while highest collar diameter (37.30 cm) and number of branches were recorded in bakain. On the other hand, black siris showed slow growth performance in respect of height, dbh, collar diameter and number of branches as compared to rest of the tree species. The results revealed that soybean taken as intercrop in the interspaces of these MPTs produced maximum yield of 6.46 g per plant in control plot. The reduction in the crop yield was maximum (49%) with subabul association followed by bakain (48%), whereas least reduction in intercrop yield (24%) was noted with siris tree association. Thus, the agri-silvi-cultural model is of much importance in managing our rural ecosystem where the major portion of population faces stringent problems of fuel, fodder, poverty and the off season employment.

15. R. K. SAMAIYA, K. C. SHUKLA AND R. K. SARAF [Development of agri-silvi-horticultural model under rainfed situation for Sagar region]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 166-168 (2001). JNKVV Regional Agricultural Research Station, Sagar-470 002 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The agri-silvi-horticultural model has a great potential as a sustainable land use management system in rainfed situation. The model was initiated in the kharif 1991 in marginal soil at JNKVV Regional Agricultural Research Station, Sagar. In the kharif 1993-94, agri-silvi-horticultural model consisted of three fruit tree species viz., pomegranate (punica granatum), Aonla (Emblica officinalis) and Karonda (Carisa carandas) with control plot (without fruit trees) and subabul (Leucaena leucocephala) was planted in each row alternating to each fruit tree species. Growth parameters of each fruit tree species like fruit tree height, collar diameter, dbh and number of branches with establishment count of fruit tree under study were recorded. Intercrop of soybean was taken in the interspaces of these fruit tree species. The maximum fruit tree height (56.00 cm) and collar diameter (2.94 cm) were recorded in E. officinalis contrary to this, the highest tree height (427.22 cm) of L. leucocephala recorded with C. carandas fruit tree association. The highest dbh (26.99 cm) of L. leucocephala was recorded with P. granatum fruit tree. The maximum number of branches (6.5) was recorded in C. carandas fruit tree. The highest number (20.22) of branches was recorded in L. leucocephala-E. officinalis association. The maximum yield of intercrop of soybean was recorded with P. granatum (11.05 g/plant) which was 14% higher over control followed by E. officinalis under rainfed situation. Thus, agri-silvi-horticultural model is an effective management system and intercrop can be grown successfully in the interspaces of the fruit tree species until a dense canopy is formed.

16. G. L. CHUNALE, R. D. BANSOD, R. B. PATIL AND B. R. PATIL [Identification of suitable grass species for soil and water conservation in Sub-Montane Zone of Maharashtra]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 169-173 (2001) National Agricultural Research Project, Sub-Montane Zone, Shenda park, Kolhapur (Maharashtra), India

ABSTRACT

Grasses reduce soil erosion due to binding action. The present study was conducted to identify suitable grass species which are locally available, have good binding abilities as that of Vetiveria zizanioides, have better performance on shallow and lighter types of soils in Sub-Montane Zone of Maharashtra and have better fodder potential. Among 10 different grass species studied, Dichanthium annulatum, Panicum maximum and Themeda triandra were found promising grass species for good soil binding abilities, better performance on shallow and lighter types of soils and good potential for green fodder. These grass species can be used for vegetative measures of soil and water conservation like vegetative bunds, vegetative key lines, etc. These can also be used as protection to the risers of bench terraces. the grass spp. Pennisetum hohenacheri was found the most effective for soil binding abilities but it has no fodder potential. Such grass species can be used for natural reinforcement of mechanical structures of soil and water conservation like gully control structures, earthen bunds, stream bank control where there is a immediate need for protection rather than fodder purpose.

17. LAXMAN SINGH AND B. PAL [Influence of saline water and fertility levels on nutrient composition and its uptake by Isabgol (Plantago ovata Forsk.)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 174-178 (2001). Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, Raja Balwant Singh college, Bichpuri, Agra-283 105 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted for two years continuously during rabi season at Research Farm, Bichpuri, Agra to assess the interactive effect of saline water and fertility levels on N and P content and their uptake by Isabgol. Pooled data of two seasons revealed that application of water ECiw 12 dSm-1 increased the N content, whereas P content significantly decreased in grain and straw as compared to ECiw 2.4 dSm-1. N uptake in grain and P uptake in grain and straw significantly reduced with water of ECiW 12 dSm-1. The fertility levels F3, F4 and F5 enhanced significantly n and P uptake by grain and straw as compared to fertility levels F1 and F2. The interactive effect of fertility levels and saline water showed that application of water ECiw 12 dSm-1 enhanced the N content in grain and vice versa in case of P content and its uptake by grain at F1, F2, F3 and F4 levels of fertility as compared to ECiw 2.4 dSm-1. Similarly, fertility levels F2, F3, F4 and F5 enhanced significantly P uptake by grain at both the levels of salinity. Fertility treatment F5, comprising 50 kg N+25 kg P2O5+25 kg K2O+20 kg znSo4 ha-1 proved significantly superior to other fertility treatments at ECiw 12 dSm-1. The superiority of the fertility treatments may be arranged as NPKZn>NPK>NPZn>NP for nutrients uptake.

18. S. SUNDAR RAJ, NEELU NANGIA, K. P. Chinnaswamy AND B. SANNAPPA [Enrichment of rainfed mulberry leaves with protein and its influence on rearing performance of Bombyx mori L.]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 179-184 (2001). Department of Sericulture, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065, India

ABSTRACT

Sixteen protein supplements, varying from 0.12-42%, were applied as dust/ automised spray on mulberry leaves. The leaves were fed to final instar of Pure Mysore breed. Among the six flours dusted on the mulberry leaves, soyabean ranked first and resulted significantly in higher larval, cocoon, pupal and shell weights, shell percentage, filament length, denier fibroin and sericin percentage compared to other protein supplements. Among the automised spray solutions, brewer’s yeast @ 10, baker’s yeast @ 1.25, silk cocoon cooking water @ 5, water hyacinth extract @ 5 and spirulina @ 10% resulted in highly significant differences in the economic traits of silkworm compared to other solutions.

19. G. RAJENDRAN, I. CANNAYANE AND N. SHOBANA [Pathogenicity of Radopholus similis (Cobb, 1893) Thorne, 1949 on banana cv. robusta]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 185-186 (2001). Department of Nematology, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (T. N.), India

ABSTRACT

Pathogenicity of the burrowing nematode, Radopholus similis on banana cv. Robusta was studied under glasshouse conditions with five inoculum levels viz., 0, 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000 nematodes per plant. Plant growth parameters viz., shoot length and weight, root length and weight, girth, number of leaves and leaf area significantly decreased when 100 or more nematodes were inoculated per plant. Older leaves exhibited drying. Pinkish lesions and extensive necrosis were developed on roots as a result of R. similis infestation. The rate of multiplication of R. similis decreased as the initial inoculum level increased.

20. S. S. DASHAD, M. V. MALIPATIL, P. D. SHARMA AND O. P. CHAUDHARY [Relative performance of different sprayers for the control of insect-pests of cotton in Haryana]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 187-192 (2001). Department of Entomology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

ABSTRACT

Efficiency of commonly used sprayers, namely, hydraulic knapsack manual operated sprayer (KS), hydraulic knapsack manual operated HI-TECH hydraulic knapsack manual operated sprayer (KSHT), power operated knapsack sprayer-cum-mist blower (PS) and controlled droplet applicator (CDA) was evaluated against insect-pests of cotton (cv. H 777) using a spray volume of 370-750 l/ha with KS, 75-150 l/ha with PS and 2-4 l/ha with CDA depending upon crop biomass. Phosphamidon 85 WSC @ 200 g a. i./ha and oxydemeton-methyl 25 EC @ 250 mg a. i./ha (I and II sprays) were appplied against sucking insect-pests during vegetative crop growth phase. Whereas monocrotophos 36 SL @ 500 g a. i./ha, fenvalerate 20 EC @ 50 g a. i./ha, quinalphos 20 AF @ 500 g and cypermethrin 10 EC @ 50 g a. i./ha (III to VI sprays) were applied during reproductive phase against bollworm pests. PS was found to be superior over other sprayers and recorded minimum leafhopper (0.96 nymphs/leaf) and whitefly (1.27 adults/leaf) population during whole cropping period. During reproductive phase also, PS recorded lowest bollworm damage in shed fruiting bodies (14.5%) and lower bolloworm damage in open bolls both on boll (14.2%) as well as locule basis (6.4%). Maximum yield of seed cotton (14.5 q/ha) was recorded in PS treatments as compared to rest of the sprayers. The KS and KS (HT) were at par with each other, whereas CDA was inferior to all other sprayers in controlling bollworm infestation and consequently lowest seed cotton yields were realized.

21. S. S. GILL, H. D. KAUSHIK AND S. K. SHARMA [Effect of modes of pollination on fruit set and insect pollinators of phalsa (Grewia subinaequalis D. C.)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 193-196 (2001) Department of Entomology, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

ABSTRACT

In the present studies on the effect of modes of pollination on fruit set and insect pollinators of phalsa, Grewia subinaequalis D. C., it was found that fruit set (61.60%) in open pollination was significantly higher than the self-pollination (23.00%). Irrespective of modes of pollination, there were non-significant differences on fruit set in tall (45.00%) and dwarf (38.01%) types of phalsa. Among different insect pollinators, Apis florea, A. mellifera, A. dorsata, Megachile bicolor and Chalicodoma cephalotes were observed foraging both nectar and pollen, while other foraged for nectar only.

22. S. KARPAGAVALLI, T. MARIMUTHU, J. JAYARAJ AND R. RAMABADRAN [An integrated approach to control rice blast through nutrients and biocontrol agent]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 197-202 (2001). Tamil Nadu Rice Research Institute, Aduthurai-612 101 (T. N.), India

ABSTRACT

The experiment was conducted to study the complementry effect of silica and NPK fertilizers alongwith foliar spray of fungicide and biocontrol agent on the blast incidence of rice. Field trials were conducted at different locations with two levels of lignite fly ash (LFA) as source of silica @ 0 and 6 t/ha. Normal levels of N and P and various levels of K were added. Foliar spray of fungicide (carbendazim) and biocontrol agent, Pseudomonas fluorescens were applied as need based. Natural incidence of blast and yield parameters viz., 1000-grain weight, filled grains and grain yield were recorded.

23. T. SARAVANAN, V. VALLUVAPARIDASAN AND V. RAVICHANDRAN [Effect of mould causing organisms of sorghum on seed and seedling vigour]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 203-205 (2001). Department of plant pathology, Agricultural College and Research Institute, Madurai-625 104 (T. N.), India ABSTRACT An experiment was conducted to find out the effect of the mould causing organisms of sorghum on seed and seedling vigour. The mould infected sorghum seeds showed maximum reduction in 100-seed weight, seed size, seed germination and vigour. The reduction was also observed in Aspergillus niger, Curvularia lunata, Fusarium moniliforme, Helminthosporium halodes and H. tetramera infected sorghum seeds.

24. V. R. K. REDDY [Genetic divergence in hexaploid triticale]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 206-212 (2001). Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Botany, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore-641 046, India

ABSTRACT

The D2 values corresponding to the paired comparison between 52 strains of hexaploid triticale (which include two wheat genotypes) were grouped into four clusters. Cluster III was the largest including 36 genotypes followed by cluster IV with eight, cluster III with six and cluster I with two genotypes. The analysis of variance for each individual character showed highly significant differences among the genotypes for all the 18 characters under study. The maximum values were observed for days to maturity, plant height, spikes/0.5 m2 and days to flowering. Clusters I and III were the most diverse, the inter-cluster distance between them was maximum. The inter-cluster proximity was maximum between clusters II and IV; hence, they were closely related.

25. SUPRIYO CHAKRABORTY AND H. K. BORAH [Genetic variability and correlations among root characters in greengram [Vigna radiata (L.) wilczek]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 213-215 (2001). A. A. U. Regional Agricultural research Station, Nagaon-782 001 (Assam) India

ABSTRACT

Genetic variability, heritability, genetic advance and correlation at genotypic and phenotypic levels were studied in 24 greengram genotypes for five root characters and seed yield. Relatively large difference between GCV and corresponding PCV for root length, number of secondary roots/plant and shoot : root ratio (by weight) indicated predominant environmental influence on them. Moderately high heritability with high genetic advance for seed yield/plant, nodules/plant and root dry weight suggested the partial role of additive gene effects in their inheritance. On the other hand, low heritability coupled with low genetic advance for root length, number of secondary roots/plant and shoot : root ratio indicated that these characters were predominantly governed by non-additive gene effects. Correlation analysis revealed that seed yield was positively correlated with number of secondary roots/plant which in turn was positively correlated with root length, nodules/plant and root dry weight.

26. INDRAJYOTHI BHATTACHARJEE, H. O. BHUSHANA, R. S. KULKARNI AND V. MUNIYAPPA [Estimation of genetic parameters in F2 generations of four different crosses of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 216-219 (2001). Department of Genetics and plant Breeding, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bangalore-560 065 (Karnataka), India

ABSTRACT

Four different crosses (Arka Abha x 148, Arka Saurabh x 148, Arka Vikas x 148 and Sheppard x 148) of tomato were used to study the different genetic parameters such as PCV, h2, GA as per cent of mean magnitude of heterosis and inbreeding depression, which could form a basis of selection of best cross and the appropriate breeding methodology to achieve crop improvement. In general, high PCV and heritability values were noticed for all the characters studied for all the cross combinations. High genetic advance as per cent of mean was noticed for all the characters. Heterosis and inbreeding depression from F1 to F2 indicated not only additive but also non-additive gene action involvement for fruit yield and number of fruits. Hence, heterosis breeding was rewarding for cross Arka Abha x 148 and Arka Saurabh x 148. Both heterosis breeding and selection of segregants from the crosses Arka Vikas x 148 and Sheppard x 148 improved the number of fruits per plant and fruit yield of tomato.

27. J. C. JANA, S. DUTTA AND R. CHATTERJEE [Genetic variability, heritability and correlation studies in turmeric (Curcuma longa L.). Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 220-225 (2001). B. C. K. V. Regional Research Station, Terai Zone, Pundibari-736 165 (West Bengal), India ABSTRACT The investigation was undertaken on 11 varieties of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) with a view to assess the genetic parameters and degree of mutual association in respect of yield and yield determining characters. The characters viz., fresh rhizome, yield per hectare, number of primary fingers per plant, weight of secondary fingers per clump and number of secondary fingers per plant showed a good amount of variability, high magnitudes of heritability and appreciable expected genetic advance. The fresh rhizome yield of turmeric was significantly correlated with length of secondary fingers and weight of primary and secondary fingers per clump. This suggested the scope for obtaining a good response to selection through direct as well as indirect selection.

28. D. K. DE, B. N. PANJA AND P. GAYEN [Influence of sowing dates on the expression of genetic variability in yellow sarson under terai region of West Bengal]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 226-231 (2001). B. C. K. V. Faculty of Agriculture, N. B. Campus, Pundibari, Cooch Behar (W. B.), India

ABSTRACT

The influence of different sowing dates on the genetic variability of eight quantitative characters in yellow sarson was investigated using nine varieties of the crop. Three dates of sowing (viz., 5 and 20 November and 5 December, 1998) were practised in a split-plot design experiment. Variation due to genotype as well as due to date of sowing was significant for all the characters studied. Proportion of the sum of squares due to genotype was higher in seeds per siliqua, seed weight per siliqua and number of siliquae per plant and the same due to date of sowing was higher in plant height and 1000-seed weight. Stability of broad sense heritability due to different dates of sowing varied with the characters, which appeared highly stable for seeds per siliqua, seed weight per siliqua and number of siliquae per plant. Genetic gain was highly stable for 1000-seed weight. For most of the characters studied, heritability, genetic gain and genetic variance were highest in case of 5 and 20 November sowings. phenotypic mean for majority of the characters including yield was highest in the former. The results indicated that selection was to be operated from 5 and 20 November sowings and the former date of sowing was advocated for getting better yield of this crop in this region.

29. A. K. SHARMA AND P. D. GAIKWAD [Callus induction in carica papaya (L.)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 232-236 (2001). Tissue Culture Laboratory, Zonal Agricultural Research Station, J. N. K. V. V. College of Agriculture, Indore-452 001 (M. P.) India

ABSTRACT

Explants of papaya variety Co-1 viz., mature and immature embryos, shoot tips, lateral buds, petioles and leaf segments were used to get in vitro induction of callus on Murashige and Skoogs media (MS) modification, using various concentrations and combinations of growth harmones and vitamins, alongwith B-5, SH (Schenk and Hildebrandt) and White’s media. Efficiency of callus induction of different explants varied with the different media used. Explants, obtained from seedling stage, gave excellent response compared to explants from flowering stage.

30. S. K. TIWARI, H. L. SINGH, R. KUMAR, H. K. NIGAM AND A. P. SINGH [A postmortem of selection parameters in pea (Pisum sativum L.)]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 237-242 (2001). Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

Thirty-four divergent genotypes of pea (Pisum sativum L.) were studied for genetic variability, heritability, genetic advance, correlation and path analysis during rabi 1998-99. Maximum variability was observed for seed yield per plant, number of pods per plant, plant height and number of primary branches per plant. Low to very high heritability coupled with low to moderate genetic advance, observed for most of the quantitative characters, indicated little scope for selection of these characters because of non-additive type gene action. Seed yield per plant exhibited significant and positive correlation with plant height, number of pods per plant, 1000-seed weight, number of grains per pod and harvest index. Path analysis revealed that pods per plant, pod length, 1000-seed weight and number of grains per pod had moderate to high positive direct effects on seed yield per plant and may be given due weightage while making selection for seed yield improvement.

31. A. K. SINGH AND V. K. SRIVASTAVA [Response of hybrid rice to nitrogen levels under transplanted conditions]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 243-245 (2001). Department of Agronomy, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (U. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 1997-98 to study the response of three hybrids, DRRH-1, Pro Agro 6201 and PAC 831 alongwith one local high yielding variety Sarju-52 under five levels of nitrogen viz., 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 kg ha-1. Incremental dose of applied nitrogen increased the grain yield significantly upto 150 kg N ha-1, beyond which yield reduction was observed at 200 kg N ha-1 level. Hybrid Pro Agro 6201 produced the maximum grain yield (62.92 q ha-1) and outyielded two other hybrids DRRH-1 (53.89 q ha-1), PAC 831 (55.87 q ha-1) and local check Sarju-52 (50.90 q ha-1). The per cent increase of hybrid Pro Agro 6201 over Sarju-52 variety accounted for 23.6%. Cost : benefit ratio with 150 kg N ha-1 (1.35) was found to be the most remunerative dose for all the three hybrids.

32. K. SRINIVASULU, R. VEERARAGHAVAIAH AND K. MADHAVI [Grain quality of rice hybrids in comparison to the conventional variety Chaitanya]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 246-248 (2001). Department of Agronomy, Agricultural College, Bapatla-522 101 (A. P.), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Bapatla during kharif 1993 to study the performance of recently developed rice hybrids methods under different planting densities. The hybrids recorded the high length to breadth ratio (L : B ratio), milling percentage and head rice recovery. Neither the planting method nor the seedling number hill-1 showed any marked variation on grain quality.

33. R. K. PATEL AND A. K. KHATRI [Yield loss caused by combined infestation of rice leaf folder and case worm in rice]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 249-250 (2001). Department of Entomology, J. N. Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Jabalpur-482 004 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

During course of survey on rice in watershed area, the insect-pests, namely, rice leaf folder and rice case worm were found to be alarming pests. The combined infestation of these two pests caused 80.34% yield loss.

34. A. S. TOMAR, D. H. RANADE, V. K. PARADKAR, L. K. JAIN AND S. K. VISHWAKARMA [Predicting monthly rainfall for Chhindwara region by using Gompertz curve technique]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 251-252 (2001). J. N. K. V. V. College of Agriculture, Indore-452 001 (M. P.), India

ABSTRACT

The present study was undertaken to develop some deterministic empirical equations to forecast the monthly rainfall for the Chhindwara region of Madhya Pradesh. The results so obtained clearly showed that the Gompertz curve technique could be utilized effectively to forecast the monthly rainfall with reasonable accuracy. This methodology can be adopted to forecast the monthly rainfall at other places too.

35. ANUREET KAUR AND V. P. SINGH [A note on mineral nutrition of crop plants]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 253-257 (2001). Department of Agronomy, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

ABSTRACT

The article discusses criteria for nutrients essentiality, number of essential nutrients, classification, functions of nutrients and their contents in plants, available forms, mobility of nutrients in plants and beneficial nutrients for plants. The material presented in this article will be useful for students, teachers, scientists, extension workers and anyone who is interested in developing a better understanding of essential plant nutrients and their functions.

36. ANUREET KAUR AND V. P. SINGH [Plant nutrient interactions–A note]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 258-260 (2001). Department of Agronomy, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

ABSTRACT

The article presents basic types of nutrient interactions in crops. An interaction between two or more nutrients takes place when the response in combination is unequal to the sum of their individual responses. The basic types of interactions between two nutrients i. e. zero interaction, positive interaction and negative interaction were discussed. The material presented in the article will be useful for understanding the interactions between nutrients by anyone who is interested in the topic.

37. S. S. PILLANIA AND V. S. BENIWAL [Deficiency and/or imbalance of essential plant nutrients–Cause of plant diseases]. Res. on Crops 2 (2) : 261-262 (2001). CCSHAU Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Jind-126 102 (Haryana), India

ABSTRACT

During April 1996, it was visually observed that the branches and leaves of a mango (Mangifera indica L.) plant were dried up at farmer’s field in village Rajana Kalan, District Jind, Haryana, India. In September 1996, the same mango plant was found bearing new bunches of leaves on the main stem and secondary branches. This change in the growth of mango plant attracted the attention of the authors. It was observed that some growth factor was responsible for rejuvenation of the mango plant. On the basis of these observations, the authors have conceived an idea that the plant diseases are caused by the deficiency and/or imbalance of the essential plant nutrients and not due to attack of micro-organisms.