Volume 2, No. 2 (December, 2017)

By | May 29, 2018

1.R. K. MAITI AND V. P. SINGH* [Physiological basis of maize growth and productivity–A review]. Fmg. & Mngmt. 2 (2) : 59-88 (2017). 1Gaurav Publications, Agricultural Research Information Centre Systematic Printers, Near Video Market, Hisar-125 001 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : cropresearch1@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

In recent years, major research activities have been directed on the physiological basis of maize growth and productivity. With respect to vegetative growth, researches have been undertaken on leaf development, distribution of oxygen in roots, growth analysis and factors influencing these activities. Besides, several modelling approaches have been undertaken for the prediction of grain yield. With respect to reproductive growth, major attentions have been given on the development of floral meristem, the effect of silk age on fertilisation and pollination. Some studies have been undertaken on transpiration, photosynthesis, oxidative stress, phototropism, tocopherol, water management, drought stress, salinity tolerance, cold tolerance and mineral nutritions. Very few studies have been undertaken for the selection of the genotypes resistant to these stress factors. Among these, a great emphasis has been given on photosynthesis. All these phenomena are directly or indirectly related with maize productivity. There is a great necessity to formulate adequate strategies for managing the crop under adverse agro-climatic conditions and the selection of crop cultivars for adaptation under these adverse situations.

2. V. P. SINGH* AND R. K. MAITI [Research trends in growth and productivity of pearl millet as influenced by biotic factors–A review]. Fmg. & Mngmt. 2 (2) : 89-95 (2017). 1Gaurav Publications, Agricultural Research Information Centre Systematic Printers, Near Video Market, Hisar-125 001 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : cropresearch1@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The present review discusses that several diseases affect the growth and productivity of pearl millet such as downy mildew (Sclerospora graminicola) and rust (Puccinia substriata). Among these, downy mildew causes devastating problem in some pearl millet growing areas leading to a severe yield reduction. Some studies have been undertaken to investigate the gravity of the problems, epidemiology of the disease and control measures as well as genetic improvement of these diseases with reasonable successes, specially in the case of downy mildew. Besides several minor diseases affecting pearl millet are reported. Insects and weeds are of minor importance in pearl millet.

3. Xiaohong Yin, Min Huang* and Yingbin Zou [Does no-tillage affect nutrient uptake and utilization by irrigated rice? Results from a long-term experiment]. Fmg. & Mngmt. 2 (2) : 96-100 (2017). Southern Regional Collaborative Innovation Center for Grain and Oil Crops (CICGO) Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410 128, China *(e-mail : jxhuangmin@163.com)

ABSTRACT

This study was carried out to determine whether no-tillage (NT) affects the nutrient uptake and utilization by irrigated rice. A fixed field experiment was conducted at the Experimental Farm of Hunan Agricultural University, Hunan Province, China during 2004-13. In each year, a hybrid rice cultivar Liangyoupeijiu was grown under a factorial combination of two tillage practices : Conventional tillage (CT) and NT, and two establishment methods : Transplanting and direct seeding. Across 10 years and 2 establishment methods, NT had no significant effect on plant N and K uptake but significantly increased plant P uptake by 7% compared with CT. There was no significant change in grain yield under NT relative to CT. The plant N, P and K uptake and grain yield responses to NT were not significantly affected by experimental duration and establishment method.

4. M. V. KAMBLE, U. V. MAHADKAR AND D. N. JAGTAP* [Assessment of effect of zero tilled cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) grown with various inputs on growth, yield and economics]. Fmg. & Mngmt. 2 (2) : 101-107 (2017). Department of Agronomy Dr. B. S. Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli-415 712, Dist. Ratnagiri (M. S), India *(e-mail : mauli296@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The field experiment was conducted during rabi season of 2016 to investigate the assessment of effect of zero tilled cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) grown with various inputs on growth, yield and economics at Agronomy Farm, College of Agriculture, Dapoli, Dist. Ratnagiri (M. S.). The experiment was laid out in randomized block design. There were eight treatments replicated thrice. The treatments mainly comprised Absolute control (T1), Weed control (T2), Weed control+RDF (T3), Weed control+RDF+Bio-fertilizers (T4), Weed control+RDF+Bio-fertilizers+Micronutrients (T5), Weed control+RDF+Bio-fertilizers+Micronutrients+Plant protection (T6), Weed control+RDF+Bio-fertilizers+Micronutrients+Plant protection+Paclobutrazol (T7) and Weed control+RDF+Bio-fertilizers+Micronutrients+Plant protection+Paclobutrazol+One irrigation (T8). From the results of the investigation, it can be concluded that during rabi hot weather season cowpea crop grown under zero tilled soil condition was provided all inputs (T8) with one irrigation which recorded the highest growth parameters, grain and stover yield of cowpea. On the basis of benefit : cost ratio treatment, weed control+RDF+bio-fertilizers+micronutrients+plant protection+paclobutrazol+one irrigation (T8) recorded highest B : C ratio followed by weed control (T2).

5. I. B. CHAVAN, D. N. JAGTAP* AND U. V. MAHADKAR [Weed control efficiency and yield of finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.] influenced due to different establishment techniques, levels and time of application of nitrogen]. Fmg. & Mngmt. 2 (2) : 108-113 (2017). Department of Agronomy Dr. B. S. Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli-415 712, Dist. Ratnagiri (M. S.), India *(e-mail : mauli296@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted to study the weed control efficiency and yield of finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.] influenced due to different establishment techniques, levels and time of application of nitrogen. The field experiment was laid out in split-split plot design with 48 treatments and three replications. Total number of 48 treatments consisted of four techniques of establishment as main plot (T1–Recommended transplanting at 20 x 15 cm, T2–Random transplanting, T3–Random broadcasting of 30 days old seedlings (Awatni), T4–Random broadcasting of 20 days old seedlings (Awatni), three nitrogen levels in sub-plot (F1–60 kg N/ha, F2–80 kg N/ha and F3–100 kg N/ha) and four times of nitrogen application as sub-sub plot [S0–Basal (half dose through suphala (15:15:15), S1–2 splits-TP, 30 DAT, S2–3 splits-TP, 30 and 60 DAT and S3–4 splits- TP, 20, 40 and 60 DAT]. Thus, it can be concluded that for obtaining higher grain and straw yield from kharif finger millet under south Konkan region of Maharashtra, the kharif finger millet should be grown by recommended transplanting at 20 x 15 cm techniques of crop establishment along with 100 kg nitrogen per ha by splitting it into three equal splits (at transplanting, 30 and 60 DAT).

6. Siyang Borang*, Egam Basar, Tape Gab and Dujum Kato [Status and economic potential of indigenous vegetables of Arunachal Pradesh]. Fmg. & Mngmt. 2 (2) : 114-118 (2017). State Horticulture Research & Development Institute Department of Horticulture, Government of Arunachal Pradesh Chimpu, Itanagar-791 111, District Papumpare (Arunachal Pradesh), India *(e-mail : siyangborang@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Arunachal Pradesh boasts of having about 5000 species of plants indigenous to it. There are more than 500 species of plants regarded edible, many of which constitute rich traditional vegetables eaten by various tribes of the state. Due to diverse ecological conditions, various types of vegetable herbs are available in different parts of the state. However, a very few literature is available on the status and potential of indigenous vegetables in Arunachal Pradesh particularly in Papumpare district. Therefore, understanding the research need in this sector, a scientific study was conducted in the year 2016-17 by the State Horticulture Research & Development Institute (SHRDI), Itanagar in the entire Papumpare district of Arunachal Pradesh. As per the survey conducted, it was found that there was substantial consumption of local vegetables like Zanthoxyllum oxyphyllum, Piper pedicellatum, Clerodendrom colebrookianum, Pouzolzia hirta, Phoebe cooperians, etc. in different pockets of Papumpare district. Also, during the investigation, 19 species of vegetables were recorded from different local markets across the district. Fourteen of which were of leafy vegetables, two of fruit, one of tender pseudo stem, one of tuber and one of floral bud. The consumption ranged from 5000 to 10000 kg per month. It was also revealed that Piper sylvaticum was most available vegetable and consumption of Piper pedicellatum was highest followed by Colocasia esculenta (Rhizome).

7. T. Laxman*, T. Ram Prakash, K. Avil Kumar and A. Srinivas [Microbial activity in Bt cotton soils as influenced by biofertilizer consortia and foliar nutrition under rainfed conditions]. Fmg. & Mngmt. 2 (2) : 119-121 (2017). Department of Agronomy PJT State Agricultural University, Rajendranagar-500 030, Hyderabad (Telangana), India *(e-mail : thejavathlaxman123@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during rainy season of 2014 at College Farm, Professor Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad to study the effect of biofertilizer consortia of microbes applied to soil and foliar application of macro-nutrients on soil microbial activity in Bt cotton. Significantly higher population of Azotobacter (4.26 log10 CFU/g soil), P. suedomonas (5.05 log10CFU/g soil) and fungi (11.18 log10 CFU/g soil) at flowering (60 DAS) was recorded with consortia of microbes applied to soil and with foliar application of 18 : 18 : 18 @ 1.5% than control (3.20, 4.03 and 7.8 log10 CFU/g soil, respectively).

8. B. B. TANDEL, R. M. PANKHANIYA, J. D. THANKI, V. G. BAVALGAVE* AND S. K. PARMAR [Yield and economics of lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) as influenced by cutting management and nitrogen levels]. Fmg. & Mngmt. 2 (2) : 122-124 (2017). Department of Agronomy Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari-396 450 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : vgbavalgave@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted on clay soil during the winter seasons of 2009-10 to 2014-15 to study the effect of cutting management and nitrogen levels on yield of lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) crop. Lucerne cut three times (at 60, 100 and 130 DAS) significantly increased the green fodder yield (33.56, 27.89 and 9.29%), dry fodder yield (66.21, 53.18 and 27.12%) and seed equivalent yield (0, 74.96 and 53.32%), respectively, over two cuts (at 60 and 100 DAS), one cut (at 60 DAS) and no cut. Application of 30 kg N/ha significantly increased the seed yield and seed equivalent yield by 10.83 and 6.65, 14.90 and 11.10 and 19.61 and 12.64%, respectively, over the 35, 25 and 20 kg N/ha. The different times of cutting, three cuts and application of 30 kg N/ha gave higher gross realization, net realization and B : C ratio.

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