Volume 18, No. 1 (March, 2017)

By | April 1, 2017

1. VIMAL RAJ YADAV*, SUBHASH CHANDRA, GURVINDER SINGH AND SAMAR PAL SINGH [Productivity and economics of direct seeded rice (Oryza sativa L.) as affected by moisture regimes and seed priming under sandy loam and silty clay loam soils]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 1-5 (2017). Department of Agronomy G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : vimalrajyadav31990@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were conducted in C5 (sandy loam) and A1 (silty clay loam) blocks for two consecutive kharif seasons during 2014 and 2015 at Norman E. Borlaug Crop Research Centre of G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand to evaluate the performance of DSR under varying moisture regimes and seed priming in different soil types. The grain as well as straw yields increased with increase in irrigation frequency being the maximum at 15 mm CPE. The mean increase in grain yield at 15 mm CPE irrigation was 4.9% over 22.5 mm and at 22.5 mm CPE by 5.9% over 30 mm CPE. The higher net returns were obtained from 15 mm CPE during both the years. Although, the mean B : C ratio was the maximum at 30 mm CPE (0.97). Hydro-priming recorded marginally higher values of grain and straw yields as well as net returns and B : C ratio over no priming, but did not cause significant variations. During both the years, the mean grain yield in silty clay loam (SCL) soil was significantly higher than obtained in sandy loam (SL) soil, being 760 kg/ha. DSR in SCL soil registered significantly higher net returns (Rs. 11357/ha) and B:C ratio (37.5%) over SL soil. Interaction effect between soil type and irrigation levels on grain yield was significant in both the years. At all the irrigation levels, SCL soil produced significantly higher grain yield than SL soil. In SL soil, the grain yield increased significantly up to 22.5 mm. While in SCL soil, the grain yield at 30 mm CPE was significantly at par with 22.5 and 15 mm CPEs.

2. YOUNG HO YEOM, OK JAE WON, WEIQIANG JIA, KANG HYUN LEE, MIN-HO YOON* AND KEE WOONG PARK [Inhibition of weed germination by mixed microbial strains in pots under conditions similar to paddy soil]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 6-9 (2017). 1Department of Bio-Environment Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Korea *(e-mail : mhyoon@cnu.ac.kr; ** parkkw@cnu.ac.kr)

ABSTRACT

Inhibition of weed germination by mixed microbial strains was investigated in pots under conditions similar to paddy soil. Mixed microbial strains were comprised of four lactic acid bacteria and four saccharomycetes. Twenty seeds of Echinochloa crus-galli, Aeschynomene indica, Digitaria sanguinalis and Amaranthus retroflexus were, respectively, sown in petri dishes and each petri dish was treated with the microbial strain solution at six rates in order to assess its effect on germination. Results showed that the germination of these weeds was effectively inhibited by application of mixed microbial strains. To evaluate the weed control effect, 20 seeds of E. crus-galli, M. vaginalis, L. prostrata, S. juncoides and A. indica were successively sown in pots under conditions similar to paddy soil. Each pot contained 10 cm-deep paddy soil clean of surface weeds, and mixed microbial strains were applied to the pots two weeks after sowing. It was found that at 80 L/ha or higher rates mixed microbial strains could simultaneously and effectively control the above five weeds in pots under conditions similar to paddy soil. In conclusion, the present study results could serve as basic information for the development of new environmentally friendly microbial herbicides in paddy fields.

3. Prabhakar* and H. T. Chandranath [Effect of planting pattern and sowing dates of maize in maize with field pea intercropping system]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 10-14 (2017). Department of Agronomy University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580 005 (Karnataka), India *(e-mail : prabhakar@uasd.in)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted to study the optimum row proportion, optimum sowing time of maize and economics of maize with field pea intercropping system. It was laid out in RCBD with three replications during kharif 2015 at farmer’s field in Lokur, village Dharwad district of Karnataka. There were nine treatments consisting of two planting patterns i. e. sowing of maize within and between the rows of maize in field pea with four dates of sowing for maize. Among the intercroppings significantly higher grain yield (4459 kg/ha), stover yield (6481 kg/ha), cob weight (251.83 g) and cob length (19.49 cm) were recorded when simultaneous sowing of maize with field pea. Green pod yield (1592 kg/ha), number of pods per plant (20.13) and number of seeds per pod (9.70) were higher when maize sown between rows three weeks after sowing of field pea. Higher net returns (Rs. 47636/ha), B : C ratio (2.36), LER (1.23) and MEY (5896 kg/ha) were recorded when maize was sown between the rows two weeks after sowing of field pea.

4. YOUNG BEOM YUN, SE JI JANG, SANG SOO KIM, HA IL JUNG AND YONG IN KUK* [Controlling levels and tolerance mechanisms of red rice accessions to protox inhibitor herbicide, oxyfluorfen]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 15-20 (2017). 1Department of Oriental Medicine Resources Sunchon National University, Suncheon 540-742, Republic of Korea *(e-mail : yikuk@sunchon.ac.kr)

ABSTRACT

Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most troublesome weeds in most rice growing regions of the world. Thus, this study was conducted to determine the tolerance levels of various red rice accessions to the protox inhibitor, oxyfluorfen and also examined tolerance mechanisms in selected red rice accessions. Tolerance levels obtained from seed bioassay were lower than those obtained from whole-plant bioassay. Twenty-one of 38 red rice accessions in seed bioassay and 37 of 38 accessions in whole-plant bioassay were tolerant to oxyfluorfen. The most tolerant accession, R 2, was >20 times more tolerant in whole-plant bioassay and 13 times more tolerant in seed bioassay than the susceptible accession, R 116. This was supported by the results of experiments on levels of superoxide, H2O2 and MDA productions. In addition, the accumulations of proto IX in R 116 were more increased than in R 2 after oxyfluorfen treatment. The tolerance mechanism in R 2 was not related to higher antioxidant enzyme activities. However, higher ascorbate contents may contribute to greater tolerance of R 2 to oxyfluorfen.

5. S. UDAYAKUMAR* AND R. SANTHI [Soil test based integrated plant nutrition system for pearl millet on an Inceptisol]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 21-28 (2017). Department of Soil Science & Agricultural Chemistry Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India *(e-mail : udhayagri307@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Soil Test Crop Response correlation studies under Integrated Plant Nutrition System (STCR-IPNS) based on targeted yield concept were conducted on an Inceptisol for pearl millet at Western Zone of Tamil Nadu during 2015-16. The requirement of N, P2O5 and K2O for pearl millet (NR) was found to be 2.87, 1.27 and 2.59 kg/q, respectively. The per cent nutrient contribution from soil (Cs) was 23.48, 32.76 and 11.10; from fertilizers (Cf) was 47.45, 45.59 and 78.52, and from organic manure (Co) was 38.03, 19.28 and 37.58 for N, P2O5 and K2O, respectively. Using the basic data viz., NR, Cs, Cf and Co, fertilizer prescription equations (FPEs) have been developed and ready reckoner of fertilizer doses was formulated for desired yield targets of pearl millet for a range of soil test values on Inceptisol. The findings also brought forth the fact that when farm yard manure (FYM) was applied @ 12.5 t/ha (with 24% moisture and 0.53, 0.26 and 0.50% NPK, respectively), 40, 24 and 28 kg/ha of fertilizer N, P2O5 and K2O could be reduced from the recommended fertilizer doses for pearl millet.

6. Nirmal Kumar Katiyar*, U. S. Mishra, Virendra Kumar, Anil Kumar, Sumit Raizada, R. K. Pathak and S. B. Pandey [Response of zinc, boron and molybdenum on growth, yield attributes and yield of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) under rainfed conditions]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 29-34 (2017). Department of Natural Resource Management Mahatma Gandhi Chitrakoot Gramodaya Vishwavidyalaya, Chitrakoot, Satna-485 334 (M. P.), India *(e-mail : nirmalkatiyar83@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Studies on the effect of zinc (Zn), boron (B) and molybdenum (Mo) on yield attributes and yield of chickpea under rainfed conditions were conducted during the rabi seasons of 2012-13 and 2013-14 at the university farm of M. G. C. G. V. V., Chitrakoot, Satna, M. P., India. Awarodhi variety of chickpea was tested with three levels of each Zn (0, 2.5 and 5.0 kg/ha) and B (0, 1 and 2 kg/ha) and two levels of Mo (0 and 400 g/ha). The highest values of yield attributes viz., plant height, number of branches/plant, number of nodules/plant, nodule dry weight (mg)/plant, number of pods/plant, number of grains/pod and test weight were recorded at Zn @ 5.0 kg/ha, B @ 2.0 kg/ha and Mo @ 400 g/ha. The highest yields of grain and stover were also observed at the above same levels of Zn, B and Mo. The response on yield attributes and yield was statistically significant with the application of Zn @ 5.0 kg/ha, B @ 2.0 kg/ha and Mo @ 400 g/ha over its lower doses. The grain yield was increased by 14.5, 7.2 and 4.8% due to the use of Zn @ 5.0 kg/ha, B @ 2.0 kg/ha and Mo @ 400 g/ha, respectively, over their respective control.

7. S. V. Khadtare*, A. S. Takate and A. B. Rajguru [Comparative evaluation of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) under different planting techniques in dryland conditions of Maharashtra]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 35-41 (2017). National Agricultural Research Project Zonal Agricultural Research Station (MPKV), ‘Krishak Bhavan’, Solapur-413 001 (Maharashtra), India *(e-mail : khadtareagronomy@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

In the scarcity zone of Maharashtra, monsoon is characterized by its uncertain and erratic nature. The agriculture in this region is often influenced by onset, amount of rainfall and intermittent dry spells. Sowing of pigeonpea in this region is mostly affected due to moisture scarcity because of late onset and influenced inversely due to moisture stress at later stages and subsequently fails to produce economic yield. A four-year field investigation on different planting techniques viz., drilling, dibbling and transplanting in four varieties of pigeonpea was conducted in factorial randomized block design at the Dry Farming Research Station, Solapur (Maharashtra) during rainy seasons of 2010-11 to 2013-14. Significantly higher seed and biological yield was recorded under transplanting method. Pigeonpea sown by transplanting method attained 50% flowering 11-15 days earlier than other methods under consideration. Significantly highest 100-seed weight (9.79 g), more number of pods/plant (113.8) and pod weight/plant (37.4 g) were noticed under transplanting. Higher consumptive use of moisture (326 mm), moisture use efficiency (2.97 kg/ha-mm) and stage-wise relative leaf water content were recorded under this method. Highest gross returns (Rs. 46464/ha) were obtained from transplanting method. Among the different varieties under investigation, cv. Vipula found better in respect of yield and yield attributes, CUM, MUE and moisture extraction. Economically, Vipula sown by transplanting method was best suited for moisture scarcity areas of Maharashtra.

8. Abhinandan Singh, Amit Kumar Singh* and Aswin C. [Effect of hydrogel and thiourea on yield, quality and nutrient uptake of Indian mustard under moisture stress condition]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 42-48 (2017). Department of Agronomy College of Agriculture, Iroisemba Campus Central Agricultural University, Imphal-795 004 (Manipur), India *(e-mail : dr.amitksingh27@outlook.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out during the winter seasons of 2013-14 at the Research Farm, Andro of Central Agricultural University, Imphal, Manipur to assess the effect of hydrogel and thiourea on yield, quality and nutrient uptake of Indian mustard [Brassica juncea L.] under moisture stress condition. The said experiment involved 13 treatments and replicated thrice under randomized block design. The crop was applied 100% RDF through 130 kg of urea, 250 kg of SSP and 50 kg of MOP accompanied with hydrogel @ 2.5 kg/ha as basal followed by thiourea @ 0.05% as foliar spray at 50% flowering and 50% pod formation. Significant improvement in yield and qualitative traits (oil & protein content and their recovery) as well as nutrient content and their uptake to mustard was recorded due to basal application of 2.5 kg of hydrogel/ha accompanied with 100% RDF followed by two foliar applications of 0.05% of thiourea at 50% flowering and 50% pod formation.

9. S. S. Acharya, R. B. P. Nirala, A. RoyChowdhury, Mainak Ghosh* and Mizanul Haque [Bio-efficacy of herbicides against complex weed flora in linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) in Indo-Gangetic plain of Bihar]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 49-56 (2017). Department of Agronomy Bihar Agricultural University, Sabour, Bhagalpur-813 210 (Bihar), India *(e-mail : mainakghosh999@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Field experiment was conducted during rabi seasons of 2012-13 and 2013-14 at Agricultural Research Institute, Patna to find out the bio-efficacy of herbicides for controlling weeds in linseed in comparison to hand weeding twice at 20 and 40 days after sowing. The most predominant weed flora observed in the experimental plots were broad leaf weeds like Rumex dentatus, Chenopodium album, Polygonum plebejium, Alternenthera sesilis, Physalis minima, Medicago polymorpha and Solanum xanthocarpum, grasses like Cynodon dactylon, Digitaria sanguinalis and sedges like Cyperus rotundus. The herbicide treatments include pre-emergence application of pendimethalin @ 1000 g a. i./ha, pendimethalin 30 EC + imazethapyr 2 EC @ 750 and 1000 g a. i./ha and post-emergence application of isoproturon 75 WP @ 1000 g a. i./ha, clodinafop 15 WP @ 60 g a. i./ha and imazethapyr 10 SL @ 40, 60, 75 and 100 g a. i./ha. The results showed that application of pendimethalin 30 EC + imazethapyr 2 EC @ 750 and 1000 g a. i./ha as pre-emergence showed inhibitory effect on the linseed seedlings. Safe herbicide pendimethalin 30 EC @ 1000 g a. i./ha recorded lowest weed biomass with highest weed control efficacy (91.5%) which was at par with isoproturon 75 WP @ 1000 g a. i./ha as post-emergence with weed control efficacy of 89.9%. The manually weeded plot recorded the highest seed yield of 1337 kg/ha among all the treatments, whereas maximum seed yield among the herbicide treatments was obtained with post-emergence application of isoproturon 75 WP @ 1000 g a. i./ha (1195 kg/ha), which was found statistically at par with pre-emergence application of pendimethalin 30 EC @ 1000 g a. i./ha (1177 kg/ha), post-emergence application of imazethapyr 10 SL @ 60 g a. i./ha (1110 kg/ha) and with manually hand weeding twice. In terms of profitability, post-emergence application of isoproturon 75 WP @ 1000 g a. i./ha gave the highest net returns, B : C ratio and incremental B : C ratio than all other weed control treatments.

10. SAURABH KUMAR SINGH*, P. N. SINGH, ALOK SHUKLA AND ALAKH NARAYAN [Effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens (PBAP-27) and ferrous sulphate on phenology and yield of peach cv. Flordaprince]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 57-60 (2017). Department of Horticulture G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : saurabh3596@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted during the years 2014-15 and 2015-16 to examine the effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens (PBAP-27) and foliar spray of ferrous sulphate on flowering, fruiting and yield of peach cv. Flordaprince. It was laid in a split plot design and the treatments comprised no inoculation (I0) and inoculation (I1) of Pseudomonas fluorescens (PBAP-27) as main plot along with four levels of foliar spray of ferrous sulphate 0.5% i. e. F0 (no spray : water spray), F1 (single sprays), F2 (two sprays), F3 (three sprays) as sub-plot treatments. The results obtained from the investigation showed that the inoculation of P. fluorescens (PBAP-27) significantly increased number of marketable fruits per tree. Three foliar sprays of ferrous sulphate resulted in significant reduction in fruit drop. The foliar spray was also significant in increasing number of marketable fruits per tree. A significant interaction was noted between P. fluorescens (PBAP-27) inoculation and foliar spray of ferrous sulphate for retaining more number of fruits per tree.

11. Dinesh Kumar*,, Suleman Mohammed, Rajesh Kathwal and Subhash Chander [Effect of different nutrient sprays on growth, fruit yield and quality of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) cv. Early Large Red]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 61-65 (2017). 1Department of Horticulture CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : saroy1008@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted at Regional Research Station (Horticulture), Buria in district Yamunanagar of Haryana state during 2014-15 on 23-year old trees of litchi cultivar Early Large Red to improve the growth, yield and quality by foliar application of nutrients i. e. calcium, zinc and boron with different concentrations. Tree growth characters like tree height, diameter and girth were not affected by any of the treatments. Borax application at 0.80% spray resulted in highest number of fruits per branch (196.1), fruit weight (21.97 g), fruit length (3.69 cm) and fruit yield (70.33 kg/plant). Also, the quality parameters including TSS content, sugar : acid ratio, reducing and non-reducing sugar and yield of quality fruits were observed with borax at 0.80% spray treatment, while highest fruit breadth (3.15 cm) was recorded with borax at 1.0% spray.

12. Arpna Bajpai* and Chandra Kant Saxena [Temporal variability of hydraulic performance in drip irrigated banana field]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 66-71 (2017). Department of Soil & Water Engineering College of Agricultural Engineering, Jabalpur-482 004 (Madhya Pradesh), India *(e-mail : arpnabajpai@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field study with banana [Musa paradisiaca (L.) var. Dwarf Cavendish] was conducted to understand the temporal variations of hydraulic performance under the surface drip irrigation system in Vertisols at Central Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Bhopal. The hydraulic performance of drip system was monitored by observing the individual plant-wise emitter discharge. The Christiansen’s Coefficient of Uniformity (CCU), Wilcox-Swailes Coefficient of Uniformity (WSCU), Statistical Coefficient of Uniformity (SCU), Low Quarter Distribution Uniformity (SDUlq) and Coefficient for Emitter Flow Variation (CEFV) for the rate of water application were evaluated. The average value of CCU remained close to 0.93 and 0.84, respectively, on revealing a reduced uniformity of water application on plants over two years of observations. Similarly, the SCU was observed 0.87 and 0.72 respectively. The values of SDUlq were found reduced from 0.79 to 0.55 in a year’s time between April 2013 and April 2014, respectively. The coefficients of emitter flow variation were worked out as 92.8, 11.5 and 83.9, 78.5 for the year April 2013 and April 2014, respectively. Whereas for the month of April 2013 average discharge rates were 6.41, 7.36, 7.82, 8.25 and 10.92 lph; the average plant height and average girth at the collar were 48.6, 57.1, 64.8, 67.3, 45.2 and 30.7, 33.0, 35.9, 38.4, and 27.2 respectively. Although for the month of April 2014 the average discharge rates were 4.7, 7.2, 7.7, 8.2 and 10.2 lph; the average plant height and average girth at the collar were 240.3, 215.3, 221.3, 223.0, 232.8 and 46.1, 36.1, 43.6, 44.4, 45.0, respectively. Different levels of emitter discharge as experienced by the banana plant were grouped into the five emitter discharge groups viz., less than 7, 7-7.5, 7.5-8.0, 8.0-8.5 and more than 8.5 lph. The plant growth parameters were significantly different at different discharge levels. The plant height and plant girth decreased with decreasing the discharge. A positive trend was observed in plant growth parameters and the application of emitter discharge for the period from January 2013 to October 2013 after which the trend was nearly plateau/ constant for the later period of time from January 2014 to April 2014.

13. KARISHMA KOHLI*, RAJESH KUMAR, ANKIT KUMAR, PRATIBHA AND MUKESH CHANDRA DUBEY [Effect of pruning height and planting distance on fruit quality of guava (Psidium guajava L.) cv. Pant Prabhat]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 72-80 (2017). Department of Horticulture G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : karishmakohli1991@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The present investigation was carried out at Horticultural Research Centre, Patherchatta and Department of Horticulture, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, Udham Singh Nagar, Uttarakhand, India during the year 2015. The two factors consisted of pruning height–control 2.0 m standard height unpruned trees (P0), 1.0 m (P1), 1.25 m (P2) and 1.5 m (P3) from the ground level and planting distance 1.0 × 1.0 m (D1), 2.0 × 1.0 m (D2), 2.0 × 1.5 (D3) and 1.5 × 1.5 m (D4) having 16 treatment combinations and each replicated four times. The main aim of the present study was to find out the suitable planting distance and effect of pruning height with their interaction effect for better quality guava fruits. Except seed hardness and acidity, the quality parameters like fruit length, diameter, weight, volume, specific gravity, weight of 100 seeds, TSS, TSS : acid ratio, total sugars and ascorbic acid were found maximum in 1.5 m pruning height from the ground level with 2.0 × 1.5 m planting distance. Overall, pruning height 1.5 m and wider spacing of 2.0 × 1.5 m may be adopted by the guava growers for getting better growth and productivity.

14. S. S. Narvariya*, A. K. Singh, Pankaj Kumar and S. K. Singh [Characterization of varieties and new accessions of mango using physico-chemical quantitative traits]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 81-86 (2017). Department of Horticulture G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145, U. S. Nagar (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : sattuhorti@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted to characterize the physico-chemical quantitative traits of different varieties and new accessions of mango for characterization during the years 2014 and 2016 at GBPUA & T, Pantnagar under tarai region of Uttarakhand. The 40 mango varieties including new accessions were selected for the experimentation. The trial was conducted in a randomized block design with three replications. The results indicated that significantly wide variations were observed among the mango varieties with respect to different physico-chemical quantitative traits of fruits. The fruit weight, length, width, pulp weight and pulp: stone ratio varied from 20.07 to 420.65 g, 3.48 to 13.28 cm, 2.81 to 8.70 cm, 13.15 to 351.64 g and 2.50 to 10.33, respectively. The higher fruit weight (420.65 g), pulp weight (351.64 g) and pulp : stone ratio (10.33) were observed in Mallika, while, maximum length of fruit was recorded in Bangalora (13.28 cm) and width (8.70 cm) in Neelgoa. However, stone weight, length and width ranged from 5.34 to 64.90 g, 2.87 to 10.64 cm and 1.92 to 5.48 cm, respectively. However, the minimum stone weight (5.34 g), stone length (2.87 cm) and width (1.92 cm) were found in Angoor Lata. The TSS, total sugar, non-reducing sugar and total carotenoids varied from 12.06 to 22.32 0B, 11.36 to 20.69%, 8.32 to 14.62% and 1.78 to 9.23 mg/100 g, respectively. The higher TSS (22.32 0B), total sugar (20.69%), non-reducing sugar (14.62%) and total carotenoid (9.23 mg/100 g) were recorded in Amrapali. The lower acidity (0.05%) was observed in Himsagar. Therefore, it can be concluded that the Mallika and Amrapali varieties of mango have excelled in terms of physical & chemical quantitative traits, respectively. Thus, these can be used for commercial cultivation as well as for further use in breeding programme for quality improvement of mango.

15. L. Wangchu*, Ponung Taki and Barun Singh [Standardization of season, shoot etiolation and growth regulators in air-layering of guava (Psidium guajava L.) var. L-49 under east Siang district of Arunachal Pradesh]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 87-90 (2017). College of Horticulture and Forestry Central Agricultural University, Pasighat-791 102 (Arunachal Pradesh), India *(e-mail : lobsang1974@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The experiment on the effect of season, shoot etiolation and growth regulators in air-layering of guava (Psidium guajava L.) var. L-49 was carried out at Fruit Research Farm, Department of Fruit Science, College of Horticulture and Forestry, Central Agricultural University, Pasighat, Arunachal Pradesh in the years 2011-12 and 2012-13. The experiment was laid out in completely randomized design (CRD) with three factors i. e. month, shoot and PGR, with four levels in month, two levels in shoot and five levels in PGR, with three replications of each level. The PGR treatments were IBA (20000 ppm), NAA (20000 ppm), IBA+NAA (10000 ppm+10000 ppm), paclobutrazol (500 ppm) and control. The air-layers with treatment T3 (IBA 10000 ppm+NAA 10000 ppm) recorded maximum number of primary roots (24.33) in June on etiolated shoot and treatment T1 (IBA 20000 ppm) in July on non-etiolated shoots (22.33). Hence, the treatments T1 (IBA 20000 ppm) and T3 (IBA 10000 ppm+NAA 10000 ppm) during the month of June on etiolated and treatment T1 (IBA 20000 ppm) in July on non-etiolated shoots were the best treatments for getting maximum rooting and survival per cent of air-layers.

16. Ajay Kumar, V. K. Tripathi*, Vishal Dubey, N. K. Katiyar and Prakash Tiwari [Influence of foliar application of calcium, zinc and boron on fruit drop, yield and quality attributes of aonla (Emblica officinalis) cv. NA-7]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 91-97 (2017). Department of Horticulture Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India *(e-mail : drvktripathicsa@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Studies on the influence of foliar application of calcium, zinc and boron on fruit drop, yield and quality attributes of aonla cv. NA-7 were carried out during two subsequent years i. e. 2014-15 and 2015-16 on the 15 years old plants of aonla cv. NA-7, located in the garden, Department of Horticulture, Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur (U. P.). NA-7, variety of aonla, was tested with the 10 treatments viz., calcium chloride (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5%), zinc sulphate (0.2, 0.4 and 0.6%) and borax (0.2, 0.4 and 0.6%) including a control. Treatments with zinc sulphate @ 0.6% significantly reduced fruit drop 67.21% and increased fruit retention 32.79%, along with higher yield 83.36 kg fruits/plant with more specific gravity 1.10 g/cc, more length 3.91 cm, fruit width 4.04 cm, weight 34.99 g and volume 32.13 cc. Significantly higher pulp weight 33.46 g, pulp : stone ratio 22.91, and reduced amount of titratable acidity 1.47% were also recorded in fruits produced from the plants treated with zinc sulphate @ 0.6%. However, more moisture 94.07%, total sugars 12.93% and TSS 15.100Brix contents were obtained from borax 0.6% treated plants as compared to control. Whereas calcium chloride @ 1.5% treated plants produced fruits having maximum ascorbic acid 619.33 mg/100 g contents. To obtain higher yield of quality fruits, plants of aonla cv. NA-7 should be sprayed with zinc sulphate and borax each @ 0.6% in the months of August in north Indian plains.

17. Kailash Sati*, Manoj Raghav, Umesh Chandra Sati and Lavlesh [Effect of zinc sulphate application on quality of potato]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 98-102 (2017). Department of Vegetable Science G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : ksati538@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

In order to investigate the response of zinc sulphate application on quality of potato tubers, field experiments were carried out during winter seasons of 2014-15 and 2015-16 at Vegetable Research Centre, G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, Udham Singh Nagar, Uttarakhand. The lay-out of experimental field was laid in randomized block design with 10 treatments with three replications. The results indicated that dry matter (22.57, 22.27 and 22.42%), starch (18.56, 19.11 and 18.83%) and protein (8.20, 8.45 and 8.33%) were maximum under treatment T9 (zinc sulphate @ 12.5 kg/ha at the time of planting and 12.5 kg/ha at the time of earthing-up), whereas available zinc content of potato tubers (52.27, 55.60 and 53.93 ppm) was higher under treatment T7 (zinc sulphate @ 25 kg/ha at the time of planting) during both the years and pooled analysis over the years, respectively. Results also indicated that specific gravity of potato tuber did not vary significantly with the treatments during both the years and pooled analysis over the years. Based on present investigation, it can be concluded that basal and/or split application of zinc sulphate at 25 kg/ha improved potato tuber quality under present agro-climatic conditions.

18. Sanchita Ghosh, Pragnyashree Mishra* and V. K. Rao [Studies on interactive effect of growing substrates and growth regulators on stem cuttings of damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) cv. ‘Ranisahiba’]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 103-109 (2017). Department of Horticulture G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : pragnyashree.mishra@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out at Model Floriculture Centre, G. B. P. U. A. & T., Pantnagar, Uttarakhand, India during the year 2014 to study the response of growing substrates and growth regulators on stem cuttings of damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) cv. ‘Ranisahiba’ with 35 treatment combinations comprising growing substrates viz., soil, soil+FYM, soil+vermicompost, soil+cocopeat, soil+rice husk and plant growth regulators viz., IBA 500 ppm, IBA 1000 ppm, IBA 1500 ppm, NAA 500 ppm, NAA 1000 ppm, NAA 1500 ppm and control. Findings of the present investigation revealed that among growing substrates soil+vermicompost planted cuttings gave best results in most of the parameters like days to sprouting (19.76), maximum sprouting percentage (79.08), survival percentage (87.28), diameter of sprout (3.31 mm), length of sprouts (66.21 cm), number of leaves (23.39), fresh weight (22.41 g) and dry weight of shoot (10.37 g), Among different concentrations of plant growth regulators, best results were obtained with application of IBA 1000 ppm, whereas IBA 500 ppm gave best results with parameters viz., survival percentage (78.83) and days taken to sprouting (19.63).

19. Sunil Kumar* and M. C. Singh [Effect of photoperiod on growth characteristics in Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. cv. Zembla]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 110-115 (2017). Division of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture ICAR–Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi -110 012, India *(e-mail : sunilfls13@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

This experiment was conducted to study the effect of photoperiod on growth characteristics in chrysanthemum cv. Zembla during 1st October 2014 to 20th December 2014 in naturally ventilated greenhouse at Centre for Protected Cultivation Technology (CPCT), IARI, New Delhi. Chrysanthemum cv. Zembla was exposed under different photoperiodic treatments of day length extension illuminating from high pressure sodium (HPS) for 6, 9, 12, 15 days @ 15 h/day in growth chamber. All the growth parameters (plant height, number of leaves, internode length and leaf area)varied significantly during different stages of growth and found that the increase in photoperiod by 15 days using high pressure sodium (HPS) lighting resulted in a significant increase in stem elongation and leaf number. Increased plant height (46.25 and 42.70 cm), internodal length (2.70 and 2.63 cm) and leaf number (32.75 and 29.75) were observed in cv. Zembla due to long day extension treatments as compared to the control. Flower bud appeared at the earliest (57 days) in the plants without any exposure to the photoperiod. However, flower opening delayed with increase in day length exposure from 6 days (66 days) to 15 days (68 days) treatments. The results also revealed that supplemental high pressure sodium lighting significantly increased in plant height, internodal length as well as leaves number with increase in day length (photoperiod).

20. NEELIMA PALAGANI and ALKA SINGH* [Post-harvest quality and physiology of gerbera flowers as influenced by bio-fertilizers, chemicals and organic growth regulators]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 116-122 (2017). Department of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture ASPEE College of Horticulture and Forestry Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari-396 445 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : dralkasinghdhaka@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A study was conducted to derive the output from individual and interaction effect of bio-fertilizers and foliar spray of chemicals and organic growth substances on flower quality and post-harvest physiology of gerbera grown under naturally ventilated polyhouse conditions. Bio-fertilizers and foliar spray as individual treatments as well as their interaction were highly significant in influencing the growth, flower quality and post-harvest physiology and vase life of gerbera flowers. Among all the treatment combinations, inoculation with bio-fertilizers along with foliar spray of spermine @ 25 ppm recorded maximum number of leaves per plant (24.53), leaf area index (4.81), yield per m2 (343.20) and significantly improved flower quality parameters viz., length of ray floret (4.81 cm), width of ray floret (1.83), girth of neck (6.60 mm) and anthocyanin content in the petal tissue (19.20 mg/g). Further, the same treatment combination significantly influenced post-harvest physiology of gerbera flowers with higher retained flower fresh weight (30.61 and 23.55 g), water uptake (33.47 and 30.53 ml) by the flower and minimum free amino acids (2.33 and 3.90 mg/g) in the petal tissue on 4th and 6th day of vase life as well as extended the post-harvest life of gerbera flowers to 10.25 days which was followed by or at par with the treatment combination of bio-fertilizers along with vermiwash @ 4%. Thus, these treatment combinations of bio-fertilizers along with foliar spray of spermine @ 25 ppm or vermiwash @ 4% improved the post-harvest quality, influenced the post-harvest physiology and thereby enhanced post-harvest life of gerbera flowers.

21. NEHA CHOPDE*, SUSHMA LOKHANDE, M. H. BHANDE AND V. P. WARKADE [Impact of time and level of pruning on growth and flowering of Jasminum sambac (L.)]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 123-128 (2017). Horticulture Section College of Agriculture (Dr. P. D. K. V.), Nagpur-444 010 (Maharashtra), India *(e-mail : nehachopde1710@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Satpuda Botanic Garden, College of Agriculture, Nagpur (M. S.) during 2013-14 and 2014-15 in factorial randomized block design with 16 treatment combinations. The treatments comprised four timings of pruning viz., 2nd week of December, 4th week of December, 2nd week of January and 4th week of January and four levels of pruning viz., light pruning (45 cm above ground level), medium pruning (30 cm above ground level), hard pruning (15 cm above ground level) and no pruning (control). The treatments were imposed on already existing three years’ old plants of Jasminum sambac (L). The results revealed that significantly maximum length of primary shoot, leaves/primary shoot and productive shoots/plant were recorded when the jasmine plants were pruned at 4th week of December, whereas, sprouts/plant, weight of 100 flower buds and shelf life of flower were non-significantly influenced by time of pruning during both the years of experimentation. In respect of level of pruning, sprouts/plant, length of primary shoot, leaves/primary shoot, productive shoots/plant, weight of 100 flower buds and shelf life of flower were noted significantly maximum with medium pruning. Interaction effect of time and severity of pruning was found significant in respect of flower yield in jasmine. Significantly the highest flower yield in terms of flower buds/plant, flower yield/plant and flower yield/ha were noted when the plants were pruned during 4th week of December at 30 cm above ground level (medium pruning).

22. Mridul Deka* and Madhumita Choudhury Talukdar [Effect of mulching on growth and flowering of tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa Linn.) cv. Double]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 129-132 (2017). Department of Horticulture Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785 013 (Assam), India *(e-mail : kishalayee@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

An experiment was laid out in a randomized block design (RBD) with three replications to evaluate the effect of mulching on growth and flowering of tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa Linn.) cv. “Double” using different mulching materials. The results revealed that plant growth characters were significantly influenced by black polyethylene mulch (T1) which recorded the highest plant height (103.46 cm), leaf number (106.50), leaf area (92.79 cm2), number of shoots (15.20) and minimum days for emergence of shoots (39.00 days). The flower characters were significantly influenced by dried leaves (T3) which recorded the maximum length of spike (88.28 cm), length of rachis (55.91 cm), number of florets/spike (40.66), self life of spike (21.66 days), self life of floret (8.00 days), vase life of spike (9.00 days), minimum days for emergence of spike (118.10 days), opening of first pair of floret (148.10 days), maximum fresh weight of spike (122.47 g) and dry weight of spike (14.59 g), whereas black polyethylene mulch (T1) exhibited maximum size of floret (6.27 cm), fresh weight of floret (2.54 g) and dry weight of floret (0.26 g).The significantly highest bulb production was exhibited by the treatment T1 (black polyethylene mulch) which recorded maximum weight of clump (470.67 g), number of bulbs (35.20) and maximum number of large (8.30) and medium (17.50) sized bulbs. The treatment T3 produced highest number of small sized bulbs (10.85).

23. ATUL PACHAURI, A. K. SARAWGI, SANDEEP BHANDARKAR AND G. C. OJHA* [Genetic variability and association study for yield contributing traits of promising core rice germplasm accessions (Oryza sativa L.)]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 133-138 (2017). Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidyalaya, Raipur- 492 012 (Chhattisgarh), India *(e-mail : ojha.gyan@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The nature and magnitude of genetic divergence and character association were estimated in identified 225 core rice germplasm accessions (landraces) received from National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources (NBPGR), New Delhi. A total of 11 quantitative traits were measured at suitable stage of rice germplasm. Core rice germplasm accessions were grouped into 15 clusters. The utmost inter-cluster distance varied from 6.654 to 1.810. The highest inter-cluster distance was observed between clusters XIII and VIII (6.653) suggesting maximum variability among them. Cluster I (3.51) showed highest mean value for 100-seed weight. Cluster XV had highest mean value for panicle length (28.65), effective tillers/plant (7.06) and L/B ratio of 3.32. The better genotype can be selected for most of the characters on the basis of mean performance in the clusters. The cluster XV showed highest grain yield/plant and effective tillers/plant (9 tillers/plant). This indicated that these clusters could be utilized in the hybridization programme for obtaining desirable transgressive segregants. The correlation coefficient of grain yield had positive and significant (P<0.01) correlation with leaf length (r=0.3443), days to 50% flowering (r=0.557), plant height (r=0.666), panicle length (r=0.3120), number of effective tillers/plant (r=0.3377), plant height (r=0.666) and panicle length (r=0.3120), had positive and significant (P<0.01) correlation with leaf width (r=0.2581), leaf length (r=0.4805), days to 50% flowering and plant height, while leaf width had positive (P=0.05) correlation with plant height. The hybridization regarding genotypes belonged to these clusters and correlation was expected to give desirable segregants in rice breeding programmes. On the basis of yield and by considering all desirable traits, germplasm accessions were identified viz., IC 460174X, IC 460313X, IC 460308, IC 860289, IC 115710, IC 1333418, IC 133376, IC 134515 and IC 124377.

24. Divya Phougat*, I. S. Panwar, R. P. Saharan, Vikram Singh and Anuradha Godara [Genetic diversity and association studies for yield attributing traits in bread wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.) em. Thell]]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 139-144 (2017). Department of Genetics & Plant Breeding CCS Haryana Agricultural Unviersity, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : divyaphougat786@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The present study was conducted to assess the variability parameters, diversity, correlations and path coefficient for eight metric traits in 44 diverse genotypes of bread wheat. Significant genotypic differences were observed for all the traits studied indicating considerable amount of variation among genotypes for each character. The highest genotypic and phenotypic coefficient of variation was observed for harvest index (%), biological yield per plant (g), tillers number per plant and grain yield per plant (g). Similarly, high heritability and genetic advance were also observed for these traits indicating the scope for their improvement through selection. Positive and significant correlation of grain yield/plant was recorded with harvest index (%), biological yield per plant (g) and tiller number per plant. Biological yield per plant (g) showed the highest direct effect on grain yield which was followed by harvest index (%). Based on Euclidean cluster tree analysis the 44 bread wheat genotypes were grouped in five clusters in such a way that genotypes within each cluster had higher similarity than between clusters i. e. the genotypes within the cluster had much smaller distance than the genotypes belonging to different clusters. Maximum divergence was present between clusters I and IV (5.826) followed by IV and V (5.288) followed by clusters III and IV (4.992). Cluster I was highly desirable as it consisted of genotypes which were good in respect to one or more characters and atleast comparable in respect to other characters. These genotypes can be used for success of breeding programme as divergent parents can lead to recovery of transgressive segregants with high genetic yield potential. Selection of genotypes with better mean yield coupled with optimum harvest index (%) should result in progenies with high grain yield potential in wheat.

25. Priyakshi Buragohain, D. K. Saikia, B. C. Dutta and R. N. Borkakati* [Influence of colours and height of the sticky traps against sucking pests of Bhut Jolokia, Capsicum chinense Jacq.]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 145-152 (2017). Department of Entomology Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785 013 (Assam), India *(e-mail : rnbk.agri@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of different coloured sticky traps against sucking pests of Bhut Jolokia during October to April 2013-14 and 2014-15, respectively. In the first season, seven coloured sticky traps viz., Violet, Red, Yellow, Orange, Green, Blue and White (Control) were used during 2013-14 and the most effective trap was placed at seven different heights (at the plant canopy level, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 cm height) during 2014-15. Results indicated that the maximum number of sucking pests viz., Aphis gossypii Glover, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius and Leafhopper, Amrasca biguttula biguttula Ishida was attracted to yellow sticky traps with a mean population of 132.0, 60.5, 34.4 and 8.3 per trap, respectively. The highest numbers of sucking pests were observed to record at yellow sticky traps placed at the plant canopy level with a population of 126.9 aphids, 49.4 thrips, 23.6 leafhoppers and 7.0 whiteflies per trap followed by traps placed at 10 and 20 cm height above canopy level.

26. V. V. PASHTE* AND C. S. PATIL [Impact of different insecticides on the activity of bees on sunflower]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 153-156 (2017). Department of Rural Technology and Social Development School of Natural Resources, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur-495 009 (Chhattisgarh), India *(e-mail : pashte.vrushali@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

This study examines the effect of different insecticides on the foraging activity of bees on sunflower (Helianthus annuus). The findings indicated that cypermethrin 10% EC and imidacloprid 17.8% SL sustained less bee visits up to two days. On third day, normal bee activity was restored in case of cypermethrin 10% EC and imidacloprid 17.8% SL treated plots. Fipronil 5% SC exhibited less bee visits only on the day of spraying. The reduction in the bee activity was observed for four days subsequent to application of indoxacarb 14.5% SC.

27. LALBABU KUMAR*, SNEHEL CHAKRAVARTY, MEENA AGNIHOTRI AND A. K. KARNATAK [Efficacy of some plant oils against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (L.) infesting greengram under storage conditions]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 157-163 (2017). Department of Entomology G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : lalbabuagri@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (L.) is the major and most destructive insect-pest of greengram seeds under storage conditions. Nine different plant based essential oils were thus evaluated for their deterrent effect on oviposition, adult emergence and seed damage caused by C. chinensis in greengram. Though all the treatments showed significantly lower number of eggs laid, adult emergence and seed damage as compared to untreated control but neem oil @ 2.5 ml/kg seeds was found to be most effective against C. chinensis. During the course of the study, it was also found that none of the treatments had apparently reduced seed germination even after four months of storage, hence, these botanicals can be used as safer alternatives to chemical insecticides for long term storage of greengram seeds.

28. YEO HYEON KIM, SE JI JAN, YOUNG BEOM YUN, SANG SOO KIM AND YONG IN KUK* [Effect of ethanol and glycerol on suppression rates of various crop pathogens]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 164-169 (2017). 1Department of Oriental Medicine Resources Sunchon National University, Suncheon 540-742, Republic of Korea *(e-mail: yikuk@sunchon.ac.kr)

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to determine suppression rates on various crop pathogens in response to ethanol and glycerol. Pyricularia oryzae, Phytophthora capsici, Colletotrichum acutatum, Rhizoctonia solani and Botrytis cinera were completely controlled by ethanol at 5 or 10%. The suppression rates of the above five pathogens by commercial alcohol (Soju) at 5% were similar to results of high purity ethanol at 5%. Suppression rates of P. oryzae by glycerol at 5 and 10% showed 43 and 73%, respectively, compared with untreated control. Suppression rates of P. oryzae by ethanol at 5%+glycerol at 3% or ethanol at 5%+glycerol at 5% showed over 90%. Rice injury due to P. oryzae infection was reduced (45-80%) by ethanol at 3, 5, and 10%, glycerol at 3%, or ethanol at 5%+ glycerol at 3%, respectively, compared with untreated control at 20 days after treatment. Symptom reduction rates of powdery mildew in cucumber plants showed 73% by glycerol at 3% and 68% by ethanol at 5% + glycerol at 3% compared with untreated control, but not by ethanol treatments. Leaf injuries, reduction of plant height and shoot fresh weight in squash, cucumber, tomato, red pepper, watermelon, and rice plants did not appear in ethanol and glycerol treatments at 3, 5, 10, and 20%. Thus, ethanol and glycerol can be used in organic crop cultivation because they showed higher controlling effect on rice blast and powdery mildew without inhibition of crop growth.

29. Hui-ping Ou, Ru-lin Xie*, Jin-sheng Huang and Yan Zeng [Nutrients uptake and removal characteristics by high-yielding sugarcane grown in Guangxi, China]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 170-175 (2017). Agricultural Resources and Environmental Research Institute Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning 530007, China *(e-mail : rulinxie@163.com)

ABSTRACT

Fertilization starts from the information of nutrition uptake, but the uptake character of high-yielding sugarcane is still not clear. The objective of our research was to define the nutrition uptake and removal of high-yielding sugarcane. Thirty-one fields of sugarcane (ROC 22) with cane yield 50% above of average were selected from main producing area in Guangxi, south-west of China, to determine the N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, B, Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu concentration in dry leaves, green tops, cane and stubble after harvest. The uptake amounts of nutrient above per unit plant parts were also computed. The results showed that 60% and 18.2-27.8% of the total uptake N, P and K accumulated mainly in cane and green tops, respectively. Ca, Mg, S, Mn and B accumulated mainly in cane. More than 50% of the total uptake Cu and Zn were in cane. Fe accumulated mainly both in stubble and cane, where each accounted for approximate 40% of the total uptake. The mean nutrient uptakes per tonne sugarcane produced were : N 1.81 kg, P2O5 0.36 kg, K2O 2.11 kg, CaO 0.91 kg, MgO 0.42 kg, S 0.50 kg, Fe 37.5 g, Mn 15.5 g, Zn 6.2 g, Cu 2.2 g and B 0.74 g. The uptake ratio of N : P2O5 : K2O was 1: 0.20 : 1.16. Mean nutrient removal per tonne sugarcane was : N 1.67 kg, P2O5 0.32 kg, K2O 1.85 kg, CaO 0.58 kg, MgO 0.32 kg, S 0.47 kg, Fe 19.2 g, Mn 11.3 g, Zn 5.0 g, Cu 1.8 g and B 0.51 g.

30. Ashok K. Rohilla*, Anil Sindhu, Rajneesh K. Sharma, Poonam Khatri, Pragati Jamdagni and J. S. Rana [Molecular assessment of genetic diversity among accessions of medicinal shrub Nyctanthes arbor-tristis (L.) from north and central India]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 176-184 (2017). Department of Biotechnology DCR University of Science & Technology, Murthal-131 039 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : ashok.rohilla@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Molecular characterization of 16 accessions of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis L. collected from different eco-geographical regions of north and central India was carried out to assess genetic diversity using RAPD markers. During RAPD analysis, amplification of genomic DNA of 16 accessions by 40 random primers generated 275 scorable bands with an average of 8.59 bands per primer, of which 180 (65.45%) bands were polymorphic and 95 (34.54%) bands were monomorphic. Each primer generated a unique set amplification product ranging in size from 200 to 2200 bp. The number of bands produced per primer ranged from 4 to 13. The PIC value ranged from 0.703 to 0.909 with an average of 0.848. The RAPD based Jaccard’s pair-wise genetic similarity coefficient for Nyctanthes accessions ranged from 0.873 to 0.680. The association amongst different accessions was presented in the form of UPGMA generated dendrogram which clearly segregated all the 16 accessions into two major clusters with equal number of genotypes in each cluster. The major clusters ‘A’ and ‘B’ were further divided into two sub-clusters. The results obtained indicated that N. arbor-tristis accessions, collected from diverse, possessed moderate level of genetic diversity and this information can be further used for the improvement of Nyctanthes for various traits through different breeding methods.

31. S. V. Patil*, S. B. Gurumurthy, G. R. Rajakumar and A. Prashantha [Effect of bioinoculants on growth parameters of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) at nursery stage]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 185-189 (2017). 1Regional Horticultural Research & Extension Centre UHS Campus, GKVK Post, Bengaluru-560 065 (Karnataka), India *(e-mail : sangappavpatil@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of bioinoculants on growth parameters of black pepper at nursery stage at College of Horticulture, Sirsi from 2013 to 2015. The data recorded for three years clearly indicated that black pepper cuttings responded well to the inoculation with various microbial inoculants under nursery stage. The plant parameters viz., root length, root dry weight and number of leaves were found to be significantly highest in cuttings inoculated with T5, T6 and T7 as compared to rest of the treatment combinations and uninoculated control. A matching trend was recorded with respect to beneficial rhizosphere microflora, per cent root colonization, spore counts and shoot P concentrations in black pepper cuttings.

32. Monika*, Priyanka and Leela Wati [Screening of rhizobial isolates from Vigna radiata for plant growth promoting traits]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 190-195 (2017). Department of Microbiology CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004 (Haryana), India *(e-mail : monikabarkodia90@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

In present study, native rhizobia isolated from root nodules of Vigna radiata grown in CCSHAU farm were evaluated for various plant growth promoting traits. A total of 65 isolates were retrieved and screened for plant growth promoting traits. The strain MRH 12 showed high IAA production, MRH 1 and MRH 12 showed the highest solubilization of phosphate and HCN production among others. MRH 1 and MRH 12 also showed tolerance to high temperature (45°C) and salt concentration (5%), which may be effective in soil with high salinity. The IAA, HCN production and phosphate solubilization shown by these isolates make them suitable for further trials.

33. Quraazah Akeemu Amin*, Towseef A. Wani, Hafiza Ahsan, Harleen Kour and Nuzhat Quadir [Enhancing storage and safety stability of low gluten cake incorporated with Fagropyrum esculentum]. Res. on Crops 18 (1) : 196-202 (2017). Division of Post-Harvest Technology Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences & Technology-Kashmir, Shalimar Srinagar-190 025 (J & K), India *(e-mail : widaad57@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Standardized levels of 4, 8, 12 and 16% Fagropyrum esculentum were incorporated into wheat flour at against control (no buck wheat flour incorporated) in order to enhance the storage and safety stability of cake. The physical properties revealed that low gluten cake showed low baking losses (0.856 to 0.837), increase in hardness (14.27 to 26.23 N), decrease in springiness (0.98 to 0.79 mm) and cohesiveness (7.79 to 0.69) of texture. However a significant decrease in moisture, alkaline water retention capacity, per cent loss in freshness and fungal count was recorded with increasing levels of buck wheat. Storage also depicted a significant effect on nutritional and microbial parameters. The highest crude protein (8.81%), crude fat (1.71%), crude fibre (2.39%) and ash (0.62%) were in 8% buck wheat fortified bread at 0 day of storage.

*******************************