Volume 17, No. 1 (March, 2016)

By | April 5, 2016

1.    M. R. Nandhakumar*, K. Velayudham and N. Thavaprakaash [Influence of crop geometry, age and number of seedlings on physiological characters in relation to yield of low land rice]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 1-7 (2016). Directorate of Crop Management Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003 (Tamil Nadu), India *(e-mail : nandhuag20@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were carried out at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India during samba (August-December) seasons of 2012 and 2013 to find out the optimum crop geometry, age and number of seedlings on growth and physiological characters in relation to yield of low land rice. The experiment consisted of three main-plot treatments viz., M1–25 x 25 cm, M2–25 x 20 cm and M3–25 x 15 cm and six sub-plot treatments S1–14 day old seedlings (DOS)+1 seedling/hill, S2–14 DOS+2 seedlings/hill, S3–14 DOS+3 seedlings/hill, S4–21 DOS+1 seedling/hill, S5–21 DOS+2 seedlings/hill and S6–21 DOS+3 seedlings/hill and replicated thrice in a split plot design. The results revealed that plant spacing, age and number of seedlings/hill showed all physiological parameters highest under this combination of M1S1 and recorded higher grain yield (7191 and 7414 kg/ha) during 2012 and 2013, respectively, and it was statistically comparable with M2S1, M2S5 and M3S5.

2.    Suchi Gangwar*, K. R. Naik, Amit Jha and Arpna Bajpai [Soil properties as influenced by organic nutrient management practices under rice based cropping systems]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 8-12 (2016). Department of Agronomy Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishav Vidyalaya, Jabalpur-482 004 (Madhya Pradesh), India *(e-mail : singh.suchi40@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were conducted during 2011-12 and 2012-13 at National Project on Organic Farming, JNKVV, Jabalpur (M. P.) consisting of two cropping systems (viz., Green manuring-basmati rice-wheat and basmati rice-berseem) and five organic nutrient management practices (ONM1–1/3 FYM+1/3VC+1/3 NEOC, ONM2–Panchagvya, ONM3–1/3 FYM+1/3 VC+1/3 NEOC+Panchgvya, ONM4–BD-501 and ONM5–BD-501+ Panchagvya). Rice-berseem cropping system had appreciably more available N and P in soil as compared to green manuring-rice-wheat system. Application of ONM3 resulted in apparently more available nitrogenas compared to ONM4.Thetotal uptake of nutrients (N, Pand K) was significantly influenced by the cropping system and nutrient management. The uptake of the nutrients was more in rice-berseem system than that of green manuring-rice-wheat cropping system. There were no remarkable changes in soil physical, chemical and microbial propertiesof the soil due to cropping systems and nutrient management practices.

3.    S. K.  Dubey, D. D. Tiwari, S. B. Pandey, U. N. Singh and N. K. Katiyar* [Effect of nitrogen, sulphur and zinc application on yield, nutrient uptake and quality of rice]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 13-15 (2016). Department of Soil Science & Agricultural Chemistry C. S. A. University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India *(e-mail : nirmalkatiyar83@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out at Fertilizer Research Farm Uttari Pura, C. S. A. University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur during 2012 and 2013. The treatments consisted of three levels of nitrogen i. e. 60, 120 and 180 kg N/ha and S 20, 40 and 60 kg/ha along with two levels of Zn 5 and 10 kg/ha, respectively. Application of nitrogen, sulphur and zinc significantly increased grain and straw yield of rice up to 5 kg Zn, 40 kg S and 120 kg N/ha. The yield further increased with increasing levels of N, S and Zn but could not reach up to the level of significance. The maximum grain and straw yield of 61.38 and 86.58 q/ha was recorded at 180 kg N/ha. Application of 40 kg S/ha resulted in a substantial increase in grain and straw yield beyond this increase in yield was non-significant. Application of Zn substantially increased grain and straw yield and maximum grain and straw yield (56.55 and 79.16 q/ha) was recorded with 10 kg Zn/ha but significant increase was noted up to 5 kg Z/ha. The NPKS & Zn uptake increased significantly with the use of nitrogen, sulphur and zinc. Quality of rice like protein starch and amylose content increased with the use of sulphur and zinc and use of nitrogen increased protein and decreased amylose and starch content in rice grain.

4.    A. K. MEDHI, S. K. CHETIA, P. C. DEY AND T. J. GHOSE [Physiological analysis of growth characteristics, dry matter partitioning and productivity in hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.)]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 16-20 (2016). Regional Agricultural Research Station Assam Agricultural University, Titabar-785 630 (Assam), India

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted with seven rice hybrids (NPH-567, NP-549, NPH-8899, NPH-369, US-312, PAC-837 and Bio-404) and a local check (Kanaklata) to study their growth characteristics, dry matter production, partitioning ability and productivity during rabi seasons of 2012 and 2013. The variety Kanaklata showed the maximum plant height. The results revealed that among the cultivars studied, the maximum tillers (13.1/plant) were produced by US-312. Highest LAI was recorded by US-312 and maximum obtained at 60 days after transplanting (4.62), whereas SLW enhanced up to 90 days after transplanting. Hybrid US-312 produced maximum dry matter (25.10 g/plant) followed by NPH-8899 (24.12 g/plant) and these varieties had good partitioning ability of dry matter to developing grains. The yield components viz., filled grains per panicle, panicle length, number of panicles per metre square and 1000-grain weight were higher in US-312 followed by NPH-8899, as a result recorded highest yield of 7480 and 7235 kg/ha, respectively compared to check variety Kanaklata (5560 kg/ha).

5.    N. Veronica*, Y. Asoka Rani, D. SubrahmaNyam, K. L. Narasimha Rao, M. Lal Ahamad and P. Prasuna Rani [Physiological and biochemical responses in rice (Oryza sativa L.) to high temperature : A review]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 21-30 (2016). Department of Crop Physiology Acharya N. G. Ranga Agricultural University, Bapatla-522 101 (Andhra Pradesh), India *(e-mail : veronica13agrico@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Rice is the staple food crop and is the livelihood for most of the people across the globe. Keeping the present climate change scenario in view, there is a severe threat due to rise in temperature that can affect rice yield potential. Heat stress is one of the major abiotic stresses hampering the growth of rice. Temperature at every growth stage plays a critical role in deciding the rice yields. The major effects of heat stress in rice on its morpho-agronomical parameters include reduced germination, poor seedling growth, reduction in plant height and tillering, reduction in number of pollen grains, poor anther dehiscence, increased sterility, reduced grain filling and poor grain quality that ultimately lead to yield reduction. From the physiological point of view, there is an inhibition of photosynthesis and related gas exchange traits, reduction in chlorophyll content and other pigments, reduction in chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm), reduction in cell membrane thermostability as well as an imbalance between photosynthesis and respiration. Biochemically, there is an increase in accumulation of osmoprotectants (praline and glycine betaine), increase in activity of antioxidants and increase in hormone accumulation (abscisic acid and ethylene). A complete understanding of mechanisms conferring thermotolerance and identification of genotypes possessing tolerance is the pre-requisite.

6.    D. D. Tiwari, S. B. Pandey and Nirmal Kumar Katiyar* [Evaluation of additional application of foliar grade SOP (K-leafTM) on yield and quality of wheat and maize grown in alluvium Gangetic plain soils of Uttar Pradesh]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 31-34 (2016). Department of Soil Science & Agricultural Chemistry C. S. Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India *(e-mail : nirmalkatiyar83@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were carried out at Fertilizer Research Station, Uttaripura, Kanpur on wheat variety PBW-550 in rabi and maize variety Azad Uttam in zaid both under C. S. Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh during 2012-13 and 2013-14 to evaluate the response ofadditional application of foliar grade SOP (K-leafTM) on yield and quality of wheat and maize. Results of the experiments revealed that use of foliar grade SOP (K-leafTM) significantly increased grain and stover yield of both the crops. Two sprays of SOP with recommended NPK increased yield of grain and straw over one spray of SOP but could not reach up to the level of significance. Reduction in the dose of potassium by 25% with two foliar sprays found better than full dose of potassium with one foliar spray of SOP.

7.    Ramesh*, S. C. Negi, S. S. Rana and S. K. Subehia [Effect of tillage, crop rotations, residue and fertilizer management on productivity, profitability and resource use efficiency of maize (Zea mays L.)-based cropping systems in north-west Himalayas]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 35-40 (2016). Department of Agronomy, Forages and Grassland Management CSK Himachal Pradesh Krishi Vishvavidyalaya, Palampur-176 062 (H. P.), India *(e-mail : rchauhan347@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Diversification and intensification of existing maize-wheat cropping system on small, undulating and marginal farmer’s field with suitable resource conserving practices is the key answer for increasing the profitability of hill farmers. Keeping this in view, an experiment with two tillage methods viz., zero tillage and conventional tillage, three cropping systems viz., maize-wheat, baby corn+frenchbean-pea-summer squash and maize+soybean-gobhi sarson+toria, two mulch treatments viz., no mulch and crop residue mulch, and two fertilizer treatments viz., recommended dose of fertilizers and 75% RDF+25% N through FYM was conducted at Palampur during kharif 2012-rabi 2014. The results showed that conventional tillage produced significantly higher maize grain equivalent yield [MGEY (11.2%)], production efficiency (13.9%), productivity of the system (11.2%), net returns (17.3%) and B : C ratio (12.4%) over zero tillage. Replacing traditional maize-wheat with baby corn+frenchbean-pea-summer squash increased MGEY (190.8%), production efficiency (190.5%), productivity of the system (182.1%), gross returns (121.0%), net returns (176.4%), B : C ratio (64.1%) and profitability of the system (176.4%). Application of mulch significantly increased MGEY by 7.4% as compared to no mulch. Similarly, integrated nutrient management also signifcantly inceased MGEY by 4.3% over recommended dose of fertilizers.

8.    RAKESH KUMAR*, J. S. BOHRA, NARENDRA KUMAWAT, ASHOK KUMAR, ANUPMA KUMARI AND AMITESH KUMAR SINGH [Root growth, productivity and profitability of baby corn (Zea mays L.) as influenced by nutrition levels under irrigated ecosystem]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 41-46 (2016). Department of Agronomy Institute of Agricultural Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (Uttar Pradesh), India *(e-mail : rakeshbhu08@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted at Varanasi during the two consecutive pre-kharif seasons of 2012 and 2013 to work out the optimum levels of NPKS and Zn application for maximizing the productivity and profitability of baby corn under irrigated ecosystem. Results revealed that root parameters, yield and economics of baby corn were influenced significantly by varying the fertility levels. Significantly highest baby cob (9.55 t/ha), baby corn (2.15 t/ha), green fodder yield (31.51 t/ha), gross returns (202.61 × 103 Rs./ha) and net returns (143.40 ×103 Rs./ha) were recorded with the application of 125% RDF. Further, application of 50 kg S/ha resulted in significantly higher baby cob (9.38 t/ha), baby corn (2.15 t/ha), green fodder yield (30.97 t/ha), net profit (142.07 × 103 Rs./ha) over control but it remained at par with application of 25 kg S/ha. Similarly, application of 10 kg Zn/ha gave the maximum baby cob (9.24 t/ha), baby corn (2.10 t/ha) and green fodder yield (30.49 t/ha) with a net profit (138.81×103 Rs./ha) over control but it remained at par with application of 25 kg S/ha. Hence, the application of 125% RDF and 50 kg S/ha along with 10 kg Zn/ha was found optimum to obtain the maximum productivity and profitability of baby corn under irrigated conditions of Varanasi.

9.    CHUNNI LAL RAI*, PAWAN SIROTHIA, R. K. TIWARI AND SHAILESH PANDEY [Weed dynamics and productivity of blackgram (Vigna mungo L.) as influenced by pre- and post-emergence herbicides]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 47-51 (2016). Department of Natural Resource Management Mahatma Gandhi Chitrakoot Gramodaya Vishwa Vidhyalaya, Chitrakoot-485 780, Satna (M. P.), India *(e-mail : chunnirai_223@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif seasons of 2012 and 2013 at the Research Farm of Mahatma Gandhi Chitrakoot Gramodaya Vishwa Vidhyalaya, Chitrakoot, Satna (M. P.) to study the weed dynamics and productivity of blackgram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper.] as influenced by pre- and post-emergence herbicides. Among weed control treatments, six treatments including pre-emergence herbicides (pendimethalin @ 1 kg/ha and oxyflourfen @ 0.2 kg/ha), post-emergence herbicide (imazethapyr @ 0.1 kg/ha) and their combinations were tested. All the growth and productivity parameters were influenced significantly due to single and double herbicidal applications to control the existing weed flora. The dual herbicides comprising pendimethalin+imazethapyr (W5) brought about significantly higher seed yield (858 kg/ha), straw yield (1155 kg/ha) and harvest index (42.64%) of blackgram over remaining treatments. While both the dual herbicides (pendimethalin or oxyflourfen as pre-emergence followed by post-emergence application of imazethapyr) proved equally superior to other single herbicides in respect to weed control efficiency (89.57 to 91.62%).

10.    B. D. PATEL*, V. J. PATEL, D. D. CHAUDHARI, R. B. PATEL, H. K. PATEL AND V. B. DARJI [Effect of weed management options on weed flora and yield of kharif greengram (Vigna radiata L.)]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 52-56 (2016). AICRP-Weed Management, B. A. College of Agriculture Anand Agricultural University, Anand-388 110 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : bdpatel62@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif seasons of the years 2011-2013 at the farm of DWSR-Anand Centre, B. A. College of Agriculture, Anand Agricultural University, Anand (Gujarat) to study the integrated efficacy of various herbicides applied as pre- and post-emergence in greengram (Vigna radiata). Among the different weed management practices, inter-culturing and hand weeding carried out at 20 and 40 DAS were found most efficient having lowest weed dry weight with higher weed control efficiency. Further, pre-emergence application of pendimethalin @ 500 g/ha or imazethapyr 75 g/ha followed by interculturing and hand weeding at 30 DAS proved to be efficient in reducing weed dry weight, higher weed control efficiency and recording higher seed and haulm yield of greengram.

11.    KAPILA SHEKHAWAT*, S. S. RATHORE, O. P. PREMI, B. K. KANDPAL AND DHIRAJ SINGH [Sustaining higher mustard productivity through conservation agriculture in semi-arid regions of India]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 57-62 (2016). ICAR-Directorate of Rapeseed-Mustard Research Sewar, Bharatpur-321 303 (Rajasthan), India *(e-mail : drrathorekapila@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The field experiments were conducted at Directorate of Rapeseed-Mustard Research (DRMR), Bharatpur, India to evaluate the effect of crop establishment methods on crop productivity, soil properties and economics of mustard in a cropping system mode. Conventional tillage (CT), reduced tillage (RT), zero tillage (ZT) and permanent furrow irrigated raised beds (FIRB) were tested for five mustard-based cropping systems viz., fallow-mustard, green manure-mustard, brown manure-mustard, clusterbean-mustard and pearl millet-mustard in split-plot design replicated thrice. The seed, stover, total biological yields, sustainability indices and economics of mustard were significantly influenced by various crop establishment methods and cropping systems. Soil carbon footprints and bulk density of semi-arid regions improved under conservation agriculture. The average increase in the seed yield of mustard after four years of the experimentation was 32.4 and 20.7%, respectively, under FIRB and ZT. The highest sustainability yield index (0.85) and production efficiency (16.01 kg/ha/day) were also observed under FIRB. An increase of 1.30 g/kg and 2.57 Mg/ha in soil organic carbon and mass of soil organic carbon, respectively, was recorded in ZT over CT. The highest mustard yield was obtained under green manure-mustard cropping system (2549 kg/ha) followed by clusterbean-mustard system (2348 kg/ha). The net returns, profitability and B : C ratio were recorded highest with FIRB and green manure-mustard cropping systems.

12.    B. S. Parmar, M. M. Patel, J. C. Patel, D. M. Patel and G. N. Patel* [Enhance mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern and Coss] productivity through sprinkler irrigation under north Gujarat conditions]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 63-67 (2016). Centre for Natural Resources Management S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar-385 506, Banaskantha (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : gnpatelsarsav@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during the rabi seasons of 2010-11 to 2012-13 at Centre for Natural Resources Management, S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar, Gujarat to test the effect of irrigation regimes (four levels of irrigation viz., sprinkler irrigation with 0.6 (I1), 0.8 (I2) and 1.0 (I3) IW/CPE ratio and surface irrigation with 1.0 IW/CPE (I4) as control on productivity and economics of mustard. Among the irrigation regimes, scheduling irrigation at an IW/CPE ratio of 1.0 through sprinkler significantly enhanced all the growth (except plant height) and yield attributes. Mustard irrigated at IW/CPE ratio of 1.0 recorded significantly the highest seed yield over surface method of irrigation in all the years and in pooled results also, whereas the highest water use efficiency of 4.56 kg/ha-mm was observed with IW : CPE of 0.60 and gradually decreased with higher irrigation schedules. Irrigation at 0.60, 0.80 and 1.00 IW : CPE ratio increased the seed yield by 3.99, 15.73 and 25.47% over control (surface irrigation), respectively. Net returns and BCR increased markedly with increase in irrigation regimes from an IW : CPE ratio of 0.60 to 1.00. Irrigation at 0.80 and 1.00 IW : CPE ratio increased the net returns by 34.45 and  19.20% over that with the 0.60 ratio, respectively. The highest production efficiency of 13.56 kg/ha/day, profitability of 258.03 kg/ha/day and relative economic efficiency of 10.26% were recorded under sprinkler irrigaion at 1.0 IW/CPE.

13.    P. M. VAGHASIA* AND M. V. NADIYADHARA [Influence of pre- and post-emergence herbicides in castor (Ricinus communis L.)]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 68-72 (2016). Main Oilseeds Research Station Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh-362 001 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : pmvjnd@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

This experiment evaluated the efficiency of weed management programmes using pre-emergence (pendimethalin and trifluralin) and post-emergence herbicides (quizalofop-p-ethyl and fenoxy propethyl) applied at 25 days after emergence in castor cv. GCH 6 under irrigated conditions at Main Oilseeds Research Station Farm of Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh for three consecutive years 2010, 2011 and 2012. The experiment was conducted in randomised block design (RBD) with three replications on medium clay soils with pH 7.9. The experimental field was infested with narrow leaved and broad-leaved weeds viz., Echinochloa colonum, Eluropus villosus, Dactyloctenium aegyptium, Brachiaria sp., Cyperus rotundus, Commelina benghalensis, Digera arvensis, Indigofera glandulosa and Amaranthus viridis. Weed free condition recorded highest castor seed yield during individual and pooled results (4429, 2546, 2581 and 3183 kg/ha, respectively). Among the herbicidal treatments, trifluralin @ 1.0 kg a. i./ha+post-emergence application of quizalofop-p-ethyl @ 0.05 kg a. i./ha at 25 DAS recorded maximum seed yield of 3005 kg/ha with lower dry weight of weeds (374 kg/ha), higher weed control efficiency (85.9%) at 75 DAS and lower weed index (5.5%) besides higher gross returns (Rs. 120208/ha), net returns (Rs. 90398/ha) and B : C ratio of 3.0. However, pendimethalin @ 1.0 kg a. i./ha+post-emergence application of quizalofop-p-ethyl @ 0.05 kg a. i./ha at 25 DAS remained at par with each other.

14.    C. P. JAYBHAYE, K. R. CHAVHAN AND M. D. GIRI [Long term effect of crop residue management on yield, economics and soil fertility status in soybean based cropping system]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 73-77 (2016). Agricultural Research Station, Buldana-443 001, Dr. P. D. K. V., Akola (Maharashtra), India *(e-mail : kiranchavhan@ymail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was carried out at Agricultural Research Station, Buldana, Maharashtra, India for 10 years (2003-04 to 2013-14) to study effect of soybean crop residue on the yield of succeeding rabi crops and soil health with special reference to organic carbon at  fixed  site in split plot design with three replications. The main plot treatments comprised four crop residue management viz., wheat with residue incorporation, wheat with no residue incorporation, chickpea with residue incorporation, chickpea with no residue incorporation and sub-plot treatments were fertilizers i. e. 50, 75 and 100% recommended doses of fertilizers for rabi crops. The results revealed that soybean crop residue incorporation significantly influenced grain yield of both the wheat and chickpea crops. The application of 100% recommended dose of fertilizer i. e. 120 : 60 : 60 kg NPK/ha for wheat and 25 : 50 : 00 kg NPK/ha for chickpea gave significantly highest grain yield, gross monetary and net monetary returns as well as improved soil organic carbon content.

15.    ALAKH NARAYAN*, P. N. SINGH, SAURABH KUMAR SINGH AND AMIT VISEN [Effect of organic manures on the flowering, fruiting and yield of peach (Prunus persica Batsch) cv. Florida Prince]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 78-83 (2016). Department of Horticulture G. B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar-263 145 (Uttarakhand), India *(e-mail : alakhgbpuat@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

An experiment was conducted during the year 2012-13 and 2013-14 to examine the effect of different doses of organic manure on flowering, fruiting and yield of peach (cv. Florida Prince). The experiment was consisted of 14 treatments each replicated three times in a randomized block design. All the treatments had significant response on flowering, fruiting and yield. The results obtained from the investigation showed that the maximum number of flowers per shoot (12.80 and 12.96), maximum initial fruit setting per cent (87.50 and 87.70%), minimum fruit drop (38.29 and 38.01%), highest final fruit setting per cent (38.12 and 38.24%), maximum number of fruits per tree (322.43 and 334.81) and fruit yield (17.52 and 18.94 kg/tree were recorded with the application of FYM 30 kg+vermicompost 10 kg+poultry manure 2.5 kg+neem cake 3 kg/tree, while minimum number of flowers per shoot (6.86 and 7.03), minimum initial fruit setting per cent (75.43 and 75.84%), maximum fruit drop (83.62 and 83.06%), minimum final fruit setting per cent (31.91 and 32.07), minimum number of fruits per plant (234.52 and 248.52) and minimum fruit yield (13.51 and 15.85 kg/tree were recorded with the application of N : P : K, 200 : 150 : 200 g/trre during both the years, respectively. Organic manure alone or in combination was helpful in improving the flowering, fruiting and yield of peach cv. Florida Prince.

16.    J. S. Brar* [Sex expression and morphological characterization of pomegranate cultivars under arid irrigated conditions of Punjab]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 84-89 (2016). Department of Fruit Science Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141 001 (Punjab), India *(e-mail : jsbrar74@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The investigation on the sex expression and floral morphology of 10 pomegranate cultivars viz., Mridula, Dholka, P-23, Phule Arkata, Bhagwa, Jodhpur Red, GKVK-1, G-137, Jalore Seedless and P-26 revealed that the  cv. Bhagwa produced highest number of flowers (368.3) followed by GKVK-1 and Jodhpur Red. However, number of bisexual flowers was maximum (204) in GKVK-1, while the number of male flowers was maxiumum (229) in Phule Arkata. But, higher percentage and of bisexual flowers was recorded in P-26 (64.7%) and P-23 (64.5%). Per cent male flowers were highest in Phule Arkata (71.1) followed by 60.5% in Bhagwa. The cultivars GKVK-1 (57.9%), Dholka (57.4%) and Bhagwa (57.1%) exhibited significantly highest fruit set. Maximum ovary height, length of stigma and style were recorded in P-26. The hermaphrodite flowers produced comparatively more stamens than bisexual flowers. Length of bisexual flowers was highest in GKVK-1, while in case of male flowers it was maximum (31.6 mm) in P-23. Pedicel length of bisexual and male flowers was maximum in Dholka and P-26, respectively. The colour development in sepal, petals and fruitlets scored highest in Mridula followed by Bhagwa and Phule Arkata. The bisexual flowers of Mridula produced maximum viable pollens followed by Bhagwa and Dholka, while the pollen viability of male flowers in all cultivars was significantly same but lower than bisexual flowers in all cultivars.

17.    NISHITH GUPTA, R. P. SHARMA, R. J. TIWARI*  AND K. S. BHARGAV [Response of pea (Pisum sativum L.) varieties to different fertility levels]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 90-94 (2016). Krishi Vigyan Kendra Rajmata Vijayaraje Scindia Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Dewas-455 001 (M. P.), India *(e-mail : ramjit.tiwari@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during 2008-09 to 2013-14 at Dewas to study the effect on pea (Pisum sativum L.) varieties to different fertility levels on growth and yield characters, uptake and balance sheet of nutrients, quality and economic viability. The results of experiments showed that the pea cv. ‘PSM-3’ recorded significantly higher plant height (43.36 cm), first picking (58.89 days), last picking (80.02 days), pod length (8.53 cm), pod width (1.39 cm), pods/plant (16.37), pod weight (5.09 g), grains/pod (7.79), weight of grains/pod (2.96 g), shelling (41.65%), biomass yield (45.25 q/ha), pod yield (67.79 q/ha), nitrogen uptake (124 kg/ha), phosphorus uptake (23 kg/ha), potassium uptake (87 kg/ha), sulphur uptake (21 kg/ha), zinc uptake (88 g/ha) and protein content (20.6%). Application of nitrogen : phosphorus : potassium : sulhpur : zinc significantly increased plant height (50.19 cm), first picking (59.19 days), last picking (77.88 days), pod length (8.41 cm), pod width (1.39 cm), pods/plant (16.53), pod weight (4.96 g), grains/pod (7.21), weight of grains/pod (2.90 g), shelling (41.46%), biomass yield (43.59 q/ha), pod yield (64.99 q/ha), nitrogen uptake (127 kg/ha), phosphorus uptake (24.5 kg/ha), potassium uptake (87 kg/ha), sulphur uptake (22.5 kg/ha), zinc uptake (71 g/ha) and protein content (20.2%) up to 25 : 19 : 13 : 25 : 7.5 kg/ha. Available nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur and zinc in soil at harvest stage increased due to the application of these nutrients in soil.

18.    Shanlian Qiu, Shaoping Zhang, Yunfa Yao, Yixin Lin, Shuangshuang Lin and Kaibin Zheng* [Effect of NPK 16-16-16, poultry-mushroom waste compost and their combinations on growth and yield of okra]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 95-102 (2016). Institute of Subtropical Agriculture Fujian Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Zhangzhou, Fujian-363 005, China *(e-mail : kaibin118@163.com)

ABSTRACT

A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of poultry-mushroom waste compost (PMWC), NPK 16-16-16 (NPK) and their combined applications on vegetative growth and yield of okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench] during June-November 2014. The experiment included nine treatments : Unfertilized control (T1), NPK 2.5 g/kg (T2), NPK 5 g/kg (T3), NPK 10 g/kg (T4), NPK 2.5 g/kg+PMWC 120 g/kg (T5), NPK 5 g/kg+PMWC 120 g/kg (T6), PMWC 60 g/kg (T7), PMWC 120 g/kg (T8) and PMWC 240 g/kg (T9). Results showed that all fertilizations increased growth and yield of okra compared with no fertilization. 10 g/kg NPK (T4) greatly inhibited the growth of plant height before 30 days after sowing (DAS) and leaf growth before 15 DAS, with maximum numbers (19.17) of flowers and minimum fruit-setting rate (35.26%). 5 g/kg NPK combined with 120 g/kg PMWC (T6) advanced maximum growth rate of plant height and most greatly enhanced early flowering. T9 with 240 g/kg PMWC obtained maximum numbers (9.83) of fruits. Individual applications of NPK (T2, T3 and T4) significantly promoted more fallen leaves and higher defoliation ratio at 90 DAS over other treatments and decreased the fruit-setting rate as increasing NPK levels. Individual applications of PMWC increased plant height, leaf number and fruit number with increasing PMWC levels. As mentioned above, application of 240 g/kg PMWC is recommended in south-eastern China for its highest yield, low cost of production and maintenance of soil fertility.

19.    JAGDISH KUMAR*, S. K. SRIVASTAVA, RAM ASREY AND H. G. PRAKASH [Effect of different herbicides on growth and yield attributes and seed cotton yield in hirsutum cotton]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 103-105 (2016). Department of Agronomy C. S. Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur-208 002 (U. P.), India *(e-mail: jagdishk64@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during kharif seasons of 2012 and 2014 at C. S. Azad University of Agriculture & Technology, Kanpur to study the effect of different uses of herbicides on growth and yield attributes and seed cotton yield in hirsutum cotton. Data indicated that application of pendimethalin @ 1 kg a. i./ha as PE+quizalofopethyl @ 50 g a. i./ha 30 DAS+one hoeing 50 DAS and weed free plot improved significantly all the growth and yield attributing characters over weedy check. Weed free check plot produced significantly highest seed cotton yield (1311 kg/ha) and lint yield (442 kg/ha) than weedy check. Herbicidal application of pendimethalin @ 1 kg a. i./ha as PE+Quizalofopethyl @ 50 g a. i./ha 30 DAS+one hoeing 50 DAS was found next best treatment of producing significantly higher seed cotton yield (1157 kg/ha) and lint  yield (357 kg/ha) than weedy check (514 kg/ha) and (174 kg/ha) seed cotton yield and lint yield, respectively. Lowest dry weight (3.98 g/m2) of weeds was recorded with direct spray of glyphosate 45% SL @ 1 kg a. i./ha. Higher weed control efficiency (83.3%) was recorded with direct spray of glyphosate 45% SL @ 1 kg a. i./ha  followed by pendimethalin @ 1 kg a. i./ha as PE+quizalofopethyl @ 50 g a. i./ha 30 DAS+one hoeing 50 DAS (63.5%). Highest net returns (Rs. 19824/ha) and B : C ratio (1.56) were obtained with herbicidal application of pendimethalin @ 1 kg a. i./ha as PE+quizalofopethyl @ 50 g a. i./ha 30 DAS+one hoeing 50 DAS.

20.    B. D. PATEL*, D. D. CHAUDHARI, R. B. PATEL, V. J. PATEL AND V. B. DARJI [Comparative efficacy of different herbicides on Bt cotton and their residual effect on succeeding crops]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 106-111 (2016). AICRP-Weed Management, B. A. College of Agriculture Anand Agricultural University, Anand-388 110 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : bdpatel62@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

The research work was conducted to study the comparative efficacy of different herbicides on Bt cotton and their residual effect on succeeding crops during kharif seasons of the years 2010, 2011 and 2012 at the farm of DWSR-Anand Centre, B. A. College of Agriculture, Anand Agricultural University, Anand (Gujarat). Inter-culturing in conjunction with hand weeding carried out at 15, 30 and 45 DAS recorded minimum weed density with maximum weed control efficiency. The said treatment also recorded maximum seed cotton yield (3127 kg/ha) as well as additional profit over control (Rs. 46367/ha). The next best treatments in order : T1–Pendimethalin @ 900 g/ha fb IC+HW at 30 and 60 DAS, T2–Quizalofop-ethyl 50 g/ha POE fb IC+HW at 30 DAS and T5–Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl 50 g/ha POE fb IC+HW at 30 DAS were found efficient and economical for weed management in Bt cotton. None of the herbicides applied at tested rates had adverse effect on succeeding wheat, chickpea and mustard crops.

21.    V. Ramamurthy*,  Munnu Singh, Akashta Srinivas, Silpasree, A. C. Ramesh Babu, L. G. K. Naidu and E. V. S. Prakasa Rao [Effect of age of plantation and season on leaf yield, content and composition of oil of Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. and soil properties in semi-arid conditions of Karnataka]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 112-117 (2016). National Bureau of Soil Survey and Land Use Planning Regional Centre (NBSS & LUP), Hebbal, Bangalore-560 024 (Karnataka), India *(e-mail : ramamurthy20464@yahoo.co.in)

ABSTRACT

Age of plantation and season of harvest of Eucalyptus citriodora are important to derive essential oil with proper chemical composition. The studies were conducted to understand the influence of these factors on foliage yield and oil content and composition and also soil properties in some commercial plantations of E. citriodora in a semi-arid region of Karnataka, India. Leaf yield of E. citriodora was significantly higher in >10 years old plantations compared to 5-10 and <5 years plantations. Rainy season (August month) harvest recorded significantly higher leaf yield than summer and winter season harvests. Essential oil content of leaves ranged between 2.1 to 2.6% in different aged plantations and 2.4 to 2.5% during different seasons. Oil content was significantly higher in plantations > 5 years old and rainy season harvested leaf (2.54%). Oil content was low when temperature was high during November to March (2.47%). At this condition, the major chemical constituents of oil were citronellal (79.7 to 83.2%) and citronellol (5.5 to 6.7%). Concentration of citronellal decreased during rainy seasons (80.04%) as compared to winter (81.75%) and summer (81.16%). Age of plantation had significant effect on soil quality parameters; as the age of plantation increased available P, K, OC, Ca, Mg, Cu, Mn, Fe and B content decreased, whereas available N, S and Zn contents increased. Soil pH of E. citriodora plantations (5.86-6.60) increased over open area (5.07).To harvest high yields with good quality foliage of E. citriodora, soil fertility management needs attention to replenish some plant nutrients.

22.    Abdelrazzaq Al-Tawaha*, Ghazi Al-Karaki and Adnan Massadeh [Effects of planting density and cutting height on herbage and water use efficiency of thyme (Origanum syriacum L.) grown under protected soilless and open field conditions]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 118-128 (2016). Department of Plant Production, Faculty of Agriculture Jordan University of Science and Technology, P. O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110, Jordan *(e-mail : abdelrazzaqaltawaha@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to determine the effects of planting density and cutting height on growth, herbage yield and water use efficiency of thyme (Origanum syriacum L.) grown under protected soilless vs. open field conditions. Two experiments were conducted during the period November 2010 to September 2011 using three planting densities (16, 20 and 26 plants/m2). Results showed that planting density and cutting heights had significant effects on fresh and dry herbage yields, number of branches and water use efficiency. The total fresh yield under protected soilless condition was obtained from four harvests, while the total dry yield under open field was obtained from two harvests during the experiment. The highest fresh herbal yield (5.289 kg/m2) under soilless condition was obtained at planting density (26 plants/m2) and cutting height (10 cm). The highest total dry yield (0.973 kg/m2) was obtained at highest planting density (26 plants/m2) at lowest level of cuts (10 cm) under protected soilless conditions. The higher WUE (2.5 and 2.6 kg/m3) values were obtained under planting density (20 plants/m2) at 10 and 15 cm of cutting height under protected soilless conditions, respectively. The results showed that planting density and cutting height had significant effects on fresh and dry herbage yields, number of branches and water use efficiency.

23.    Ram Keval, Amit Yadav*, C. P. Srivastava and Rahul Kumar [Evaluation of certain newer insecticides against pod fly (Melanagromyza obtusa) and pod borer (Helicoverpa armigera) on long duration pigeonpea]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 129-133 (2016). Department of Entomology & Agricultural Zoology Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (U. P.), India *(e-mail : amitento21@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The investigations on efficacy of different newer insecticides action (Acetamiprid 20 SP @ 20 g a. i./ha, spinosad 45% SC @ 73 g a. i./ha, rynaxypyr 18.5 SC 30 g a. i/ha, dimethoate 30 EC @ 600 g a. i./ha, profenophos+DDVP 20 ml+0.5 ml/l, acephate 75 SP @ 750 g a. i./ha) against pod fly (Melanogromyza obtusa Malloch) and pod borer (Helicoverpa armigera Hubner) on long duration pigeonpea variety “Bahar” were carried out at Agricultural Research Farm of Banaras Hindu University during the kharif seasons of 2012-13 and 2013-14. Among the insecticides tested, the lowest pod and grain damage by H. armigera was recorded in the plot treated with rynaxypyr 18.5 SC @ 30 g a. i./ha (1.66 & 2.67% and 0.53 & 2.05%, respectively) which was at par with spinosad 45% SC @ 73 g a. i./ha (2.00 & 3.33% and 0.57 & 2.51%, respectively). While in case of pod fly, the lowest pod and grain damage was recorded in the plot treated with spinosad 45% SC @ 73 g a. i./ha (22.66 & 23.00% and 11.55 & 7.74%, respectively) which was at par with acetamiprid 20 SP @ 20 g a. i./ha (26.66 & 24.33 and 11.78 & 8.68%, respectively).

24.    B. L. JAKHAR*, SURENDRA KUMAR and Y. RAVINDRABABU [Efficacy of different newer insecticides against legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata (Geyer) on pigeonpea]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 134-136 (2016). Pulses Research Station S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar-385 506 (Gujarat), India *(e-mail : bjakhar@rediffmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Maruca vitrata (Geyer) is a major limitation in pigeonpea production. Keeping this point in view, the field experiments were undertaken on “Web-forming Lepidopteran, M. virtata (Geyer) : An emerging and destructive pest in pigeonpea”. The experiment was conducted at Pulse Research Station, S. D. Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar during kharif 2013-14 and 2014-15 in randomized block design having three replications and seven treatments. Spays were given at 50% flowering stage and then at 15 days interval. The results showed that both in individual years as well as in pooled data, two sprays of chlorantraniliprole 18.5 SC @ 0.15 ml/l of water gave maximum control of pod borers (3.33%) with maximum grain yield (1817 kg/ha) but was at par with indoxacarb 15.8 EC @ 0.5 ml/l pod borers damage (3.83%) with a grain yield (1758 kg/ha).

25.    R. K. KALYAN AND O. P. AMETA [Efficacy of various insecticidal spray schedules against insect pests of soybean]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 137-143 (2016). Agricultural Research Station (MPUA&T), Banswara-327 001 (Rajasthan), India

ABSTRACT

Two sprays were given in the soybean, of which first spray was given against whiteflies, semilooper and girdle beetle at 35 days after germination (DAG) and second spray was given at 55 DAG against gram pod borer and tobacco caterpillar. The significant maximum reduction in white fly population was recorded in case of thiamethoxam 25 WG at 3 and 5 days after spray (DAS) during the years 2012 and 2013, respectively. It was followed by imidacloprid 200 SL, while the significant highest reduction in the larval population of semilooper and girdle beetle was recorded in case of profenophos 50 EC at 3 and 5 (DAS) during the years 2012 and 2013, respectively. It was followed by triazophos 40 EC and dimethoate 30 EC against semilooper and girdle beetle, respectively. In the second spray, indoxacarb 14.5 EC @ 345 ml/ha caused significantly maximum reduction of gram pod borer and tobacco caterpillar larvae at 3 and 5 DAS during the years 2012 and 2013, respectively. Similar trends were also observed at 7 DAS during both the years. The insecticidal spray schedule comprising first spray of triazophos 40 EC @ 1.25 l/ha at 35 DAG followed by second spray of flubendiamide 480 SC @ 100 ml/ha at 55 DAG provided the highest mean seed yield of 1925 kg/ha. The maximum net profit of Rs. 15,008/ha was obtained in case of spray schedule comprising first spray of triazophos 40 EC @ 1.25 l/ha at 35 DAG followed by second spray of flubendiamide 480 SC @ 100 g/ha at 55 DAG with the maximum cost : benefit ratio of 1 : 8.52. The minimum net profit of Rs. 3,698/ha was obtained in first spray of monocrotophos 36 SL followed by second spray of triazophos 40 EC with the minimum cost : benefit ratio of 1 : 3.32.

26.    Sandip Patra*, B. C. Das, S. Sarkar and A. Samanta [Efficacy of newer insecticides against major lepidopteran pests of cabbage]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 144-150 (2016). Division of Crop Protection ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region,Umiam-793 103 (Meghalaya) India *(e-mail : sandippatra47@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The experiments were conducted at Bidhan Chandra KrishiViswavidyalaya, Kalyani, Nadia, West Bengal, India during rabi seasons of 2011-12 to 2013-14 for management of major lepidopteran pests of cabbage. The treatments viz., pyridalyl 10 EC (56.25, 75, 112.5 and 150 g a. i./ha), indoxacarb 14.5 SC (56.25, 75, 112.5 and 150 g a. i./ha), chlorfenapyr 10 SC (75, 100, 150 and 200 g a. i./ha), chlorpyriphos 20 EC (250 g a. i./ha) and triazophos 40 EC (250 g a. i./ha) were applied twice with three replications. Pooled data indicated that chlorfenapyr @ 200 g a. i./ha recorded lowest percentage of DBM damage (1.38%) followed by pyridalyl @ 150 g a. i./ha (2.33%) and indoxacarb @ 150 g a. i./ha (2.38%). Minimum infestation of S. litura was found in indoxacarb @ 150 g a. i./ha treated plots (1.38%) followed by pyridalyl @ 150 g a. i./ha (1.96%). Highest marketable yield (61.88 t/ha) was recorded in indoxacrab (150 g a. i./ha) treated plots followed by chlorfenapyr (200 g a. i./ha) and pyridalyl (150 g a. i./ha) with 59.71 and 59.43 t/ha marketable yield, respectively.

27.    HARIKAMAL BARMAN*, ANIRUDDHA ROY, SHAON KUMAR DAS, N. U. Singh,  D. K. Dangi, dahun and a. k. tripathi [Antifungal properties of some selected plant extracts against leaf blight (Alternaria alternata) in tomato]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 151-156 (2016). University of North Bengal, Siliguri, Darjeeling-734 013 (West Bengal), India *(e-mail : harikamalbarman@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

A study was carried out under laboratory conditions during 2013-14 to evaluate the antifungal property of five different plantson leaf blight of tomato, Alternaria alternata. Aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of X. strumarium, Clerodendrum viscosum, Allium sativum, Polyalthia longifolia and D. stramonium showed less activity than the leaf extracts made in ethyl acetate. In antifungal assay agar of A. sativum, leaf extract (ethyl acetate) showed 100% inhibition of radial mycelial growth against A. alternata. Ethyl acetate extracts of X. strumarium, C. viscosum, P. longifolia and D. stramonium also showed antifungal growth inhibitory activity of A. alternata (inhibition 57.7, 75.5, 73.3 and 62.2%, respectively). Benzene was the best solvent for extraction of the antifungal properties among the five plants tested. Bioassay studies of bavistin against A. alternata showed minimum inhibitory concentration of 3 mg/ml. X. strumarium plant extracts tested against the pathogen have shown one distinct antifungal zone at Rf 0.85. The disease index was reduced to 1.2 when plants were sprayed with X. strumarium.

28.    S. KALITA, PURNIMA DAS, L. K. HAZARIKA, P. DUTTA, GAUTAM HANDIQUE* AND KARISHMA DAS [In vitro compatibility of entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill. with leaf extracts of Chromolaena odorata (Asteraceae)]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 157-162 (2016). Department of Entomology Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785 013 (Assam), India *(e-mail : handique.gautam@yahoo.com)

ABSTRACT

The compatibility of Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill. with Chromolaena odorata (L.) King & H. Rob. (Asteraceae) was evaluated in vitro. Aqueous and solvent extracts of leaves of C. odorata at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1% were evaluated on the growth, conidial density and germination of B. bassiana by using the poisoned food technique. The extracts exhibited varying effects on growth of the fungus ranging from toxicity to inhibitory action, which increased with increase in the concentrations. The reduction percentage of radial growth of B. bassiana over control was found to be significantly less with the aqueous extracts of C. odorata. Inhibitory action was found to be highest (96.93%) with the chloroform extracts at 1% concentration. Similarly, as the concentrations increased from 0.1 to 1%, there was a significant reduction in the conidial density and germination in all the test concentrations. Based on the findings, the order of compatibility based on percentage reduction of radial growth is as follows : water > petroleum ether > methanol > acetone > chloroform. Hence, the aqueous extracts of C. odorata at 0.1% concentration can be integrated along with B. bassiana in any biointensive pest management programme.

29.    K. V. R. Rao*,  A. Bajpai, S. Gangwar, L. Chourasia and K. Soni [Maximising water productivity of wheat crop by adopting drip irrigation]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 163-168 (2016). ICAR-Central Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Bhopal-462 038 (M. P.), India *(e-mail : kvramanarao1970@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

The research work was carried out at ICAR-Central Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Bhopal during 2011-14. The data were collected using standard procedure and were analyzed by using Fisher’s analysis of variance technique of RBD.  Initial interest in the use of drip irrigation for row crops like wheat was motivated by its very low water productivity with traditional methods of irrigation. Maximizing water productivity is one of the most important priorities in developing countries like India, where the ground water levels are at alarming stage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the wheat yield in response to change in drip emitter spacing and compare the water productivity and water saving with conventional irrigated systems. Five irrigation treatments were considered in the present experiment. The treatment details were : T1 : Conventional practices, T2 : System of wheat intensification, T3 : System of wheat intensification with drip emitters spaced at 20 cm, T4 : System of wheat intensification with drip emitters spaced at 30 cm and T5 : System of wheat intensification with drip emitters spaced at 40 cm. The greatest plantheight, number of tillers per metre square, number of effective tillers, chlorophyll content and root length were recorded under SWI with drip irrigation at 20 cm emitters spacing (T3). Yield and yield contributing parameters were also higher with T3 as compared with conventional practice (T1) viz., number of grains per earhead,average earhead length, average earhead weight, average grain yield, straw yield and harvest index.Among the drip irrigation treatments, however, there was no significant difference of grain yield between T3 and T4 treatments indicating the drippers spaced at 30 cm could be recommended to lower the cost of the drip system in wheat crop.

30.    SHIMANTINI BORKATAKI*, PURNIMA DAS, R. L. DEKA, KARISHMA DAS AND SOMAR HAZARIKA [Occurrence of Aphis craccivora on Clerodendrum indicum–A new record from north-east India]. Res. on Crops 17 (1) : 169-171 (2016). Department of Entomology Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat-785 013 (Assam), India *(e-mail : shimantini.bk@gmail.com)

ABSTRACT

Clerodendrum indicum (L.) Kuntze, a medicinal shrub, is gaining worldwide recognition and importance because of its outstanding property as anti HIV-I agent. Studies on seasonal incidence of A. craccivora Koch, an important polyphagous pest, were carried out on C. indicum under field conditions during 2012-14 at Jorhat, Assam. The peak population was recorded during the month of November 2012 followed by December 2012. Similar trend of occurrence was also observed during 2013-14. Multiple regression modelwas developed for A. craccivora Koch to predict their seasonal incidences under the agro-climatic conditions of Jorhat.

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